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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



January 7, 1976 
January 7, 1976 



INDEX 



Executive Committee 



Long-Range Planning Committee 



January 21, 1976 Budget Committee 
February 4, 1976 Executive Committee 



February 4, 1976 



Faculty & Educational Policy 
Committee 



February 17, 1976 Buildings & Grounds Committee 



February 18, 1976 



Faculty & Educational Policy 
Committee 



February 18, 1976 Budget & Finance Committee 
February 24, 1976 Health Affairs Committee 



March 2, 1976 
March 3, 1976 
March 23, 1976 
March 24, 1976 
March 31, 1976 
March 31, 1976 



April 7, 1976 
April 20, 1976 
April 20, 1976 
April 21, 1976 
April 21, 1976 



April 21, 1976 



May 4, 1976 
May 11, 1976 
May 18, 1976 



Budget & Finance Committee 



Executive Committee 



Student Affairs Committee 



Budget & Finance Committee 

Long-Range Planning Committee 

Faculty & Educational Policy 
Committee 



Executive Committee 

Long-Range Planning Committee 

Budget & Finance Committee 

Student Affairs Committee 

Buildings & Grounds Committee 

Faculty & Educational Policy 
Committee 

Executive Committee 

Health Affairs Committee 

Faculty & Educational Policy 
Committee 



Pages 

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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May 18, 1976 
May 19, 1976 
May 19, 1976 



June 2, 1976 



June 2, 1976 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



INDEX 



Student Affairs Committee 



Budget & Finance Committee 

Long-Range Planning Committee 

Faculty and Educational Policy 
Committee 



August 4, 1976 
August 4, 1976 
August 10, 1976 



Executive Committee 



Budget & Finance Committee 



Executive Committee 



Buildings & Grounds Committee 



September 8, 1976 Budget & Finance Committee 

September 8, 1976 Executive Committee 

September 8, 1976 Faculty & Educational Policy 

September 28, 1976 Health Affairs Committee 



September 29, 1976 



Faculty & Educational Policy 
Committee 



September 29, 1976 Long-Range Planning Committee 
September 29, 1976 Budget & Finance Committee 



October 6, 1976 
October 6, 1976 



October 6, 1976 
October 19, 1976 



October 25, 1976 



November 3, 1976 
November 3, 1976 



Executive Committee 

Faculty & Educadtional Policy 
Committee 

Buildings & Grounds Committee 

Health Affairs Committee 

Student Affairs Committee 

Buildings & Grounds 

Executive Committee 



November 22, 1976 Health Affairs Committee 
November 22, 1976 Student Affairs Committee 



3: 30 p.m 



Pages 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



INDEX 



November 30, 1976 Budget & Finance Committee 
November 30, 1976 Buildings & Grounds Committee 
December 1, 1976 Faculty & Educational Policy 



2:00 p.m 
2:00 p.m 



10:00 a.m 



Pages 



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December 1, 1976 Executive Committee 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



4805 



January 7, 1976; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, 
Spiller, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, 
recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Weldon 

Other Trustees : Trustees Morgenthau, Dennis and Rothenburger ; 
Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis, Mr. Callahan 
representing Trustee Anrig, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding, Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Janis, Senior Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the 
President; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Mrs. Hanson, Associate 
Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organi- 
zation and Management 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor /Dean-designate Bulger, Acting Dean 
Butcher, Dr. Howe, Dr. Regan 

Guest : Ms. Susan Tehan from the Executive Office of Educational 
Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. Chairman 
Healey asked President Wood for his remarks. President Wood 
first addressed the fiscal situation of the University. He said 
the University had fared comparatively well in the difficult 
times of the past year, despite having to change its financial 
affairs on the basis of a continuing resolution and two interim 
state budgets. He described some of the effects on management 
of these fiscal measures: the purchasing cycles of the campuses 
were disrupted, there was a continuing cash flow problem and 
there were problems in purchasing fuel. The FY 1976 Appropria- 
tion Act left the University with five problems: (1) the equip- 
ment accounts had been set at zero, which the University would 
try to rectify with transfers, (2) overtime was prohibited, which 
at times necessitated calling in outside help to perform work 
which the University's own staff could perform, (3) the critical 



Fiscal Issues 



4806 



Exec. Comm. 
1/7/76 



UM/Worc ester — 

Hospital 

Opening 



UM/Worcester — 

Medical Center 

By-laws 

(Doc. T76-034A) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



need process was to continue, (A) a limitation on available federal 
funds was a possibility, and (5) merit and contact hour require- 
ments had been maintained. 



The University's response to the budget crisis was one 
of austerity, said the President, but in the coming year program- 
matic adjustments would have to be made. He commended the cam- 
puses for their responses to the crisis, and said that he and 
the senior staffs of the campuses would be meeting tomorrow to 
study possible strategies for the coming year. On the positive 
side, he said, the basic functions of the University — teaching, 
research, and service — had continued throughout the year and the 
University Hospital had been authorized to open. 

Trustee Robertson, Chairman of the Health Affairs Com- 
mittee, reported on that Committee's meeting of the previous 
day. He first informed the Committee that the Hospital would 
open on January 18 as scheduled with 28 beds of a 72-bed floor 
opened first. Nurses were to report for duty next Monday, he 
said, and there had been no reports of dissatisfaction or prob- 
lems on the part of the Worcester community hospitals as a 
result of the recruting efforts. Chancellor /Dean-designate 
Bulger said that he believed that anticipated problems with the 
community hospitals had been lessened, that there was no short- 
age of nurses at present, and that there would be no census prob- 
lem, despite concerns he had heard expressed about overbedding 
in hospitals nationally. 

Trustee Robertson reported on a discussion at the Health 
Affairs Committee meeting on the problem of admitting privileges 
of part-time clinical faculty. The view had been expressed at 
the meeting that these physicians should have this privilege, 
since they had played a vital role in teaching medical students 
while the Medical School was acquiring its own clinical faculty. 

Secretary Parks expressed concern about the Hospital 
deficit. He suggested that a ceiling ought to be set on the de- 
ficit because it would erode the educational budget of the Com- 
monwealth. Discussion followed about the difficulty of predict- 
ing exactly what the deficit for FY 1976 would be because of 
rapidly changing data. President Wood observed that the FY 
1976 Operating Budget would go to the Budget Committee on January 
21 and then to the full Board on February 4. The question of 
a ceiling on the deficit of the Hospital could be considered 
separately at that time. 



Continuing his report, Trustee Robertson explained that 
the Medical Center By-laws (Doc. T76-03AA) had been presented 
to the Committee on Health Affairs at its December 11 meeting, 
and reservations had been expressed about the appeals procedure 
and about the character of the proposed Hospital Management 
Board (HMB) . These portions had been revised in time for the 



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4807 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

January 6 Committee meeting. Trustee Robertson was asked about 
the HMB, and he explained that according to counsel, the Board 
of Trustees did not have the power to delegate management respon- 
sibilities to the HMB; therefore, the HMB must formally be limited 
to an advisory function. He raised the possibility of introducing 
enabling legislation so that the Board could delegate some of its 
power. 

A discussion ensued about the wisdon of having Trustees 
on this Board. Secretary Parks said that the Board must guarantee 
fiscal accountability, and he added that to "commingle" the mem- 
bership of the HMB and the Board of Trustees would be hazardous 
to this end. Chairman Healey also stated that it might not be 
desirable to have Trustees on the HMB if it was to be truly 
advisory, and the point was made that the original plan to have 
Trustees as members was borrowed from the "Minnesota Plan," which 
HMB was more operational in character. The Chairman reiterated 
that this problem would have to be resolved legislatively. 

Secretary Parks raised several other questions about 
the By-laws, particularly about student membership on Committees, 
types of professionals to be included in the category of allied 
health staff, and about control over experimentation on patients 
who come from state hospitals. In the following discussion, it 
was stated that any patient who comes to the Hospital must approv^ 
any procedure involved in treatment, and Dr. Howe described the 
careful controls over research-related activities to prevent 
any risk to a patient of an improper medical procedure. Secretary 
Parks said he missed any description of these controls in the 
By-laws or in the Interagency Agreement. Chairman Healey said 
he did not believe that assurances of this sort should be placed 
in the By-laws, and Mr. Lynton explained that the Medical School 
By-laws, which went into these matters more carefully, would be 
combined with the Hospital By-laws and would come before the 
Trustees later. After further discussion, a motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To approve and adopt the following sections and 
articles of Doc. T76-034A, the ByOlaws of the 
University of Massachusetts Medical Center: 
Section I, Articles I and II; Section III, 
Articles I and II; Section IV, Articles I-IV 
and Section Vi, Articles I-VII, IX-XIV, with 
the provision that these By-laws be reviewed 
in their entirety by the Board of Trustees 
no later than September 1, 1976 after receiv- 
ing the comments and recommendations of the 
University of Massachusetts Hospital Review 
Commission. 

Although not a member of the Committee, Secretary Parks 
asked that the Governor be recorded as opposed in principle to 
the motion. 



Exec. Comm. 
1/7/76 



4808 



Exec. Coram. 
1/7/76 

UM/ Worcester — 
Utilization 
Review Plan 
(Doc. T76-035) 



UM/Worcester — 
Interagency 
Agreement #1 
(Doc. T76-031C) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Robertson turned next to the Utilization Review 



Plan (Doc. T76-035) . He described this as a standard plan which 
was needed to satisfy third party payers. Mrs. Bluestone said 
that Commissioner Fielding had a few observations, but to save 
time she would transmit them in the form of a letter. A motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the Utilization Review 
Plan for the University of Massachusetts 
Hospital as set forth in Trustee Document 
T76-035. 

Trustee Robertson continued his report, introducing the 
proposed Interagency Agreement #1 (Doc. T76-031C) between the 
Medical Center and the Executive Office of Human Services which 
would improve health care throughout the Commonwealth by means 
of contracts for cooperation between the two agencies. He said 
the Health Affairs Committee had regarded this as an exciting 
first step, and viewed it as consistent with the statement of 
goals of the Medical Center. Questions were raised about the 
priority of activities of this sort for the Medical Schook, and 
about the potential loss of revenue if the Commonwealth were to 
be slow in reimbursing clinical faculty who perform services at 
other state institutions. President Wood pointed out that this 
was an "umbrella" agreement, and not an actual contract. All 
such contracts would be closely monitored for their cost implica- 
tions. 

Secretary Parks raised questions with respect to langu- 
age of the agreement, especially the reporting relationship between 
the regional committees and the Statewide Medical Advisory Com- 
mittee. It was pointed out that these committees would report to 
the statewide committee, and the Chairman asked that this clarifi- 
cation be included in the document as a condition of the vote. 
There was no further discussion and it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED ; To authorize the President of the University, 
the Chancellor/Dean Designate of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Medical Center and the 
Acting Dean of the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School to execute on behalf of the 
University Interagency Agreement #1 set forth 
in Trustee Document T76-031C, or as said 
Agreement may be amended by the parties; 
further, to recommend that the Chancellor/ 
Dean of the Medical Center, or if necessary, 
the Acting Dean of the Medical School, in 
consultation with the President of the Uni- 
versity, be authorized to negotiate and to 
execute contracts developed in accordance 
with the provisions of the aforementioned 
Interagency Agreement. 



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4809 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Completing his report, Trustee Robertson informed the 
Committee that the Health Affairs Committee had heard a report 
from Dr. Andrew Canada of the Department of Pharmacy and Clinical 
Pharmacy on the possibility of securing federal funds to cover th^ 
cost of establishing a Poison Control and Information Center at 
the Medical School. After a discussion of this idea, the Health 
Affairs Committee encouraged the Medical School to proceed with a 
formal proposal to the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Gordon next reported on a proposal for the 
writing of General Liability Insurance on the Medical School and 
Hospital by the Joint Underwriting Association of Massachusetts. 
This insurance policy was the result of a year-long search and he 
strongly urged that the policy be approved before the Hospital 
opens on January 18. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
in consultation with the President, to pur- 
chase from the Medical Malpractice Joint 
Underwriting Association of Massachusetts 
general liability insurance for the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Medical School and 
Hospital at a cost not to exceed the quota- 
tion set forth in Trustee Document T76-037. 

The next item was a fund transfer for the purpose of 
meeting federal contractual matching obligations for equipment 
and repairs and replacements. There was no objection, and a mo- 
tion was made, seconded and 

VOTED ; To approve the transfer of funds requested by 
the Amherst and Boston campuses in order to 
meet contractual Federal matching equipment 
obligations and to provide funds for emergency 
equipment repairs and replacement as follows: 

AMHERST : 

$200,000 from subsidiary account 13 to 
subsidiary account 15. 

BOSTON : 

$20,000 from subsidiary account 13 to 
subsidiary account 15. 

The Chairman presented a second proposed transfer for 
the purpose of providing assistance to disadvantaged students. 
There was no discussion and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the President to transfer funds 
in account 7400-9604, Assistance for 



Exec. Comm. 
1/7/76 



UM/Worcester- 

General 

Liability 

Insurance 

(T76-037) 



Fund Transfers 



4810 



Exec. Comm. 
1/7/76 



Grant and Loan 
Program for 
Nonresident 
Students 
(T76-036) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Disadvantaged Students, as follows 



03 
13 



(180,000) 
+180,000 



I 



The next item was a proposed establishment of a grant 
and loan program for the relief of nonresident students, includ- 
ing foreign students, who were caught unprepared by the sudden 
tuition increase enacted by the Legislature. Trustee Spiller 
observed that the funds were to be transferred from the Trustee 
reserve account, and he asked whether this transfer would have 
any adverse effect on other activities of the University. The 
President replied that it would, and he mentioned some of the 
effects. The President also made the point that this was an ex- 
ample of a positive impact of a student presentation. He recallec 
that the appeal of the foreign students made at the November 26 
Executive Committee meeting and at the December 3 Board of Trustees 
meeting had been instrumental in bringing about this action. 
Chancellor Golino expressed his appreciation to the Board for 
taking this action on behalf of the foreign students. A motion 
was made and seconded, and it was 



VOTED : That in order to reduce the impact of the 
tuition increase for both foreign and out- 
of-state students, a grant and loan program 
be instituted. This program is to be created 
solely because of the timing of the tuition 
increase and shall be in effect only for the 
second semester of the current academic year. 
Determination of eligibility shall be made 
by the financial aid offices on each campus. 

VOTED : That $60,000 be allocated from the Trustee 

Reserve of the Trust Fund Interest account for 
this purpose. These grants shall be used as 
follows : 

— $24,000 shall be allocated to pay the full 
cost of second semester tuition for the 
foreign students to whom full-year commit- 
ments for tuition waivers were made. 

— $11,000 shall be allocated to defray a 
part of the cost of the tuition increase 
for foreign students who do not have tui- 
tion waivers. Allocations will be made by 
the aid offices in accordance with accepted 
aid practices. 

— $10,000 shall be allocated to defray a part 
of the cost of the tuition increase for 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

out-of-state students. Allocations will 
be made by the aid offices in accordance 
with accepted aid practices. 

— $15,000 shall be allocated as a loan fund. 
Loans will be available to students who are 
not considered for grants or waivers but 
who are determined to be in need of assist- 
ance due to the timing of the tuition increase. 
Allocations will be made by the aid offices 
in accordance with accepted aid practices. 

Although not on the formal agenda, a discussion followec 
about the disruptions which had occured during the December 3 meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. Several suggestions were put forth 
as to measures the Trustees might take to ensure that such dis- 
ruptions do not happen again. It was said that further discus- 
sion of this matter might take place at the February 4 meeting 
of the Executive Committee. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



4811 



Exec. Comm. 
1/7/76 



Gladys? Keith Hardy U 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4812 



PRESENT 



ABSENT: 

UM/ Amherst — 

Enrollment 

Planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

January 7, 1976; 3:30 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Rowland; President Wood; 



Trustees Carlson, Clark, Robertson, Rothenburger , Shaler, Spiller; 
Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Miss 
Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 



Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; 
Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel- 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Chappell, Acting Dean 
of the Graduate School; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative 

Trustees Anrig and Weldon 

The meeting was called to order at 3:55 p.m. by Chair- 
man Rowland, who opened discussion of Enrollment Planning at UM/ 
Amherst by asking for comments on the draft enrollment statement 
before the Committee. 

Trustee Carlson stated his view that the proposed state-' 
ment did not seem to him a "no growth" or "winding down" plan, 
but actually called for a modest increase in the total FTE enroll- 
ment over the present year. Chancellor Bromery explained that the 
guideline of 23,000 FTE students is not an immediate goal and 
noted that he anticipated the actual enrollment would be under 
the ceiling figure for some time to come due to the budget re- 
straints. 



Trustee Carlson emphasized the importance of making sure 
that when the enrollment statement is circulated to the public, 
they will understand that the 23,500 figure is a long-range ceil- 
ing and not an immediate goal. Both Trustees Carlson and Spiller 
expressed concern that the public might construe this figure as 
an attempt to increase enrollment at UM/Amherst. It was agreed 
that although long-range planning should not be tied to current 
budgetary considerations, a cover statement should be prepared 
that makes clear the intent of the planning statement. 

Secretary Hardy brought to the attention of the Com- 
mittee a request from Trustee Eddy that she receive materials 
related to Amherst campus development. Chairman Rowland asked 
Mrs. Hardy to see that Trustee Eddy was kept informed. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Rowland expressed concern over the proposed 
statement "exempting" Continuing Education enrollment from the 
enrollment guidelines. Vice Presidnet Lynton replied that a 
review of the continuing education programs is currently under 
way and that a report is expected very soon. He said that except 
for administrative support, the Continuing Education Division is 
self-supporting. Many of the programs are off -campus. It was 
the consensus that the proposed statement should be revised to 
reflect the current status of the Division of Continuing Educa- 
tion and to state that no significant changes in enrollment are 
contemplated pending the outcome of the review. 

Chancellor Bromery indicated that the part of the 
statement which would be hardest to implement immediately was the 
proposed 60:40 ratio of upper- to lower-division students in part 
because of cost implications. There followed a brief discussion 
of the recruitment and selection of transfer students. Professor 
Wilkinson raised the question of the definition of FTE graduate 
students and was informed that the campus and the President's 
Office had agreed to use the national standard, now set at 12 
credit hours. There being no further discussion, on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees adopt 
the following policy statement and policy 
guidelines on enrollment at the University 
of Massachusetts/Amherst , subject to continu- 
ing review by the President and the Board of 
Trustees in consultation with the Chancellor 
and the campus community. 

For more than four years the Trustees have been con- 
cerned with the appropriate size and distribution of enrollment 
at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. During that period, 
reductions in statewide enrollment projections, changing patterns 
of graduate school demand and prospects, shifts in the under- 
graduate profile and growing concern for environmental impacts 
have reinforced the importance of this review and the modifica- 
tion of early assumptions of continued and even unlimited growth. 

The Trustees consider the Amherst Campus to have reachec 
full size and assume that shifting demands and new program direc- 
tions at both the graduate and undergraduate level will be accom- 
modated through the careful reallocation of resources, including 
existing academic facilities. The Trustees reaffirm the Univer- 
sity's responsibility for high quality graduate education within 
the public sector and consider this to be a major and vital mis- 
sion of the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. Meeting this 
commitment, however, does not require the continued expansion of 
graduate enrollment or an enlarged proportion of graduate student^ 
in on-campus programs. By not including off-campus programs 



LRP Comm. 
1/7/76 



4814 



LRP Comm. 
1/7/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

within the enrollment ceiling the Trustees intend to encourage 
further development of non-traditional programs, particularly at 
the graduate level. Protecting the opportunity for innovation 
will, of course, be particularly difficult in a time of budgetary 
constraints . 

The Board of Trustees accepts the following enrollment 
guidelines for the University of Massachusetts at Amherst: 

1. An overall enrollment ceiling of 23,500 FTE and 
26,500 headcount students is established for the 
Amherst campus. This ceiling applies to all on- 
campus graduate and undergraduate students regard- 
less of classification. 

2. On-campus FTE graduate enrollment should not ex- 
ceed 14% of total on-campus FTE enrollment. 

3. In order to accommodate the increasing demands for 
transfer opportunity, the undergraduate FTE enroll- 
ment should include 40% lower division and 60% 
upper division students. 



4. The Amherst campus should seek to increase educa- 
tional opportunities for part-time, older, and 
other non-traditional students through regular 
on-campus as well as off-campus programs. 

5. The Amherst campus should be encouraged to develop 
off-campus programs in several carefully selected 
fields, especially at a master's level, with the 
acknowledgement that off-campus graduate programs 
will require a careful reexamination of existing 
policies and procedures regarding full-time study 
requirements and student fees. 

6. Enrollment in the Division of Continuing Education 
is currently under review and the present enroll- 
ment is not reflected in the projections; however, 
no significant change in size is contemplated 
until the review is completed. 

7. The method for computing FTE and the definition 
of other appropriate enrollment terms (i.e. on- 
campus, off-campus, full-time, part-time, lower 
division, upper division) shall be established 
by the Planning Office in consultation with the 
respective campuses. 

It was the consensus that the proposed policy statement 
should be circulated to the full Board of Trustees a week before 
the February meeting and that a press conference should be held 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

after the meeting of the Board to ensure that the implications of 
the statement are correctly interpreted in the press. 

Following brief discussion of suggested agenda for 
future meetings of the Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 
4 :50 p.m. 



Gladys Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4815 



LRP Comm, 
1/7/76 



4816 



PRESENT: 



Operating 


Budget 


for 


Fiscal 


Year 


1976 





(Doc. T76-039) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

January 21, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood 
Trustees Breyer, Croce, Rothenburger , Troy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Secretary Hardy; Ms. Judd, recorder 

| Other Trustees : Trustees Gavin and Fielding 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Gordon 



Office of the President: Mr. Janis , Senior Vice President for 



Management and Business Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget 
Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization 
and Management; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 



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UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Gaffney, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Cathey, Controller; Robert Woolard, Student 
Representative 

The meeting was called to order at 11:10 a.m. Chairman 
Carlson began discussion of the Operating Budget for Fiscal Year 
1976 (Doc. T76-039) by pointing out that the information was in 
summary form due to the lateness of the Legislature's action on 
the FY 1976 Budget; however, he said, account distributions have 
been reflected in the document. He then asked President Wood for 
his comments. 



President Wood stated that there would be a greater re- 
liance on non-state funds than there had been in the past. The 
restrictions included in the FY76 Appropriation Act were not only 
difficult, but complex. He told the Committee that the Office of 
the General Counsel had produced three opinions on legal inter- 
pretations of the Act. They deal with the position freeze as well 
as the University's flexibility in this regard, ways in which the 
President's Office is funded and common service accounts are 
established, and issues of federal funding. On the basis of these 
opinions, he said, the campuses are developing guidelines which 
will enable him to redelegate personnel appointments back to the 
campuses, within the limits of the Appropriation Act. He concluded 
by expressing the hope that there would be a rescission of the 
current freeze. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson welcomed Mr. Janis to the meeting; he 
in turn called upon Mrs. Hanson for highlights of the key issues 
in the Operating Budget. Mrs. Hanson pointed out that the overal 
budget figure is $160 million — an increase, mainly in non-state 
funds, of less than 4 percent over last year. The budget for 
University Administration, she said, differs from that of FY 1975 
in that the state has mandated that it be supported entirely from 
one direct appropriation. Although this budget has been cut sub- 
stantially, the present figure is "liveable" due to the fact that 
during the period of the interim budget, there was continued re- 
liance on the campuses and trust funds to cover personnel costs. 
She noted the personnel cut in the President's Office as well as 
the cuts in non-personnel expenditures. 

A newly-established area this year is that of Common 
Services, currently consisting of Administrative Data Processing 
and Management Systems which were formerly funded on the Amherst 
campus. The budget for that component is now supported by the 
three campuses and the President's Office. In response to a ques- 
tion, she said that the decision had been made that the major 
cost would be borne by the Amherst campus; each of the other cam- 
puses had been asked to contribute a share of the cost increase 
as well as a percentage of the base amount. President Wood said 
that user service would be the basis of funding this operation 
in the future. 

Speaking about the Amherst operating budget, Mr. Gulko 
said that the cash reduction from last year's budget is approxi- 
mately $6 million, before inflation is considered. The impact 
has been felt mainly in personnel and support for the academic 
areas. The total vacancy figure is approximately 12.7 percent 
with 476 vacancies; previous estimates had indicated that the 
vacancy figure would be about 500, but with the continuation of 
the freeze, that figure may be exceeded. 



It had been decided by the Chancellor, he said, to 
attempt to accommodate the budget reduction through attrition — 
essentially a one-year major dislocation — rather than through large- 
scale layoffs. The academic area has been the hardest hit by 
attrition, both in the support area and in the number of faculty 
available to teach. With the release of money previously budget ec 
to the President's Office and the transfer of Administrative 
Data Processing and the Management Systems Group to common ser- 
vices, the hope is to alleviate the situation during the second 
semester by directing these monies twoard support services and 
teaching assistants. 

President Wood then commented that the University can- 
not indefinitely continue an austerity program, and it must make 
program and priority choices. Because of the impact of budget 
cuts, adjustments will have to be made in classifications and 
personnel descriptions and assignments. Responding to Trustee 



4817 



Budget Comm. 
1/21/76 



4818 



Budget Comm. 
1/21/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Croce's query on the cessation of attrition, President Wood said 
that if an early release is obtained on critical needs positions, 
that state could come about in early spring and be reflected in 
the FY 1977 budget. Although hardships are evident now, fundamental 
damage is not yet apparent — a situation which may change during 
the next fiscal year. 



Trustee Breyer inquired about the basis for decision- 
making in cuts in the academic area. Mr. Gulko replied that the 
Chancellor of the Amherst campus has been very clear in his state 
ments both to the campus and the Board of Trustees that the 
I decision was made this year to accommodate the cuts through attri- 
tion, since there was no indication at the beginning of the year 
of the long-range implications. The picture for FY 1977 is no\<r 
fairly clear, and there must be an effort to map the resources 
of the campus against its needs, regardless of prior distribu- 
tions. Large-scale programmatic shifts are likely to occur. 

President Wood concurred with the Chancellor's view, 
but added that the Board of Higher Education's budget recommenda- 
tions are likely to be more favorable than the Governor's House I 
recommendations, and he reiterated the University's position that 
the budget recommended to the General Court is the budget voted 
by the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Fielding then said that he would find it helpful 
as a Trustee to know the costs per student in similar programs 
in other parts of the country, in order to ascertain the Univer- 
sity's programmatic comparability nationally. Chairman Carlson 
said that he and other Trustees had requested the same informa- 
tion. The problem, however, is an extremely complex one. The 
Budget Office is currently working on it, and the Chairman said 
he hoped for progress during the coming fiscal year. Mr. Gulko 
added that the Amherst campus will be adopting a costing mechanism 
for internal comparisons within academic units; this information 
will be available in the fall. He pointed out, however, that 
interinstitutional comparisons are of a far greater magnitude. 
He then used the federal government's still uncompleted six-year 
project as an example of the difficulties for agreement on cost 
factors experienced nationally. 



After an explication of specific figures in the Operat- 
ing Budget for the Amherst campus, Trustee Fielding noted that 
while the Boston campus figure shows a significant reduction in 
the utilities account, the Amherst campus shows an increase. He 
wanted to know the reason for the disparity. Mr. Gulko replied 
that at Amherst, utilities included coal as well as electricity; 
the 60 percent increase in the account is significantly less than 
the percent increase of the cost of coal itself. The campus has 
maintained a strict energy conservation program and has made every 
attempt to keep costs at a minimum. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Turning to the Boston campus, Chairman Carlson invited 
Chancellor Golino to make his comments. Chancellor Golino said 
that the campus has had to operate on approximately $1 million 
less than last year. While all efforts have been made to operate 
within the amount allocated, levels of frustration have appeared 
in various segments of the campus due to the personnel cut and 
the inability to shift personnel and positions to areas of need. 
For example, while funds have been allocated for specific posi- 
tions, if those positions become vacant, they cannot be filled 
unless they fall within the critical needs list. The campus finds 
itself in the position of having to operate without a Registrar 
or Affirmative Action Officer. The requirement of a lesser budget 
has been met, enrollment has not been cut, but in general, he 
said, it has been and continues to be a difficult year. Trustee 
Rothenburger pointed out that the campus has had to operate for 
some time without a Special Admissions Officer. 

President Wood said that General Counsel's opinion does 
give some leeway for contractual activities and non-permanent 
positions, so that some relief has been provided. This has been 
done in a minimum way since the intent of the legislation — not to 
replace vacated positions — is clear. The burden on the University 
is that some areas have been weakened by random accident. He 
pointed out that, generally speaking, the impact of critical need$ 
definitions has been greatest on any program that has institution^ 
personnel. Trustee Fielding concurred that the situation has 
been terribly frustrating. 



Mr. Baxter said that the major item in the Boston budget: 
is fuel and that tremendous strides in austerity have been made 
in this area to add up to substantial savings. Chairman Carlson 
asked the reason for the increase in the Administration and 
Finance section of non-state funds. Mr. Baxter replied that this 
was due to two items: (1) increased revenue from the parking 
and transportation trust fund and (2) a doubling in volume of the 
work being done by the Survey Research Program. 



In response to a question from Trustee Troy with regard 
to positions for fall 1976 in College IV, Chancellor Golino replied 
that the campus does now have the positions and the funding and 
is waiting for permission, through the critical need process, to 
fill those positions. Trustee Troy also commented on what he 
termed the "disproportionate" amount for institutional services 
at UM/Boston. Mrs. Hanson said that further explanation would be 
available at the next meeting. 

Discussion then turned to the Worcester campus. Chair- 
man Carlson noted that for the first time, there were separate 
sections for the Medical School and University Hospital. Mr. 
Cathey said that while the two were separated in the Operating 
Budget, the allocation had come in a lump sum. At Acting Dean 
Butcher's request, he pointed out that for the Medical School, 



4819 



Budget Comm. 
1/21/76 



4820 



Budget Comm, 
1/21/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

this was a very tight budget, terming the increase "more apparent 
than real." This was due chiefly to two factors: (1) the con- 
tinued growth of the school, the need to add clinical faculty 
for both the teaching program and the Hospital, and the fact 
the dollars for the clinical faculty appear in the Medical School 
budget, and (2) the special stipulation that $750,000 of the $1 
million increase in the budget is restricted for use in the Famil\ 
Practice residency program — an amount seven times greater than 
that used for last year's program. It is likely, he said, that 
the Worcester campus would be asking the Board for budget adjust- 
ments during the coming fiscal year, as figures having to do with 
operation of the Hospital come in. 

Trustee Troy asked for clarification of the funding for 
the 26 residents in the Family Practice program. Mr. Cathey 
replied that these residents are in community health centers and 
that the Medical School absorbs about 50 percent of the training 
costs for them. 

Turning to the Hospital budget, Mr. Cathey said that 
although $5.5 million has been allocated, an amendment had been 
filed to hold the level at $3.5 million plus income which the 
Hospital certifies it can collect during the year. This amend- 
ment did not pass, but UM/Worcester plans to operate within its 
stipulation. Therefore, the Hospital operating budget has been 
kept to $3.5 million, or the deficit that the state has agreed to 
finance, plus an estimated $700,000 in income receipts 

After thanking the campus representatives for their 
thorough reviews, Chairman Carlson made a motion which was second- 
ed, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the University of Massachusetts Operating Budget 
for Fiscal Year 1976 as summarized in Trustee 
Document T76-039. 

Mrs. Hanson commented briefly on the status of the FY 
1977 budget and said that more information should be available 
for analysis at the Committee's next meeting. She distributed 
a table comparing the recommendations of the Executive Office of 
Educational Affairs and those of the Board of Higher Education 
for all segments of public higher education. Chairman Carlson 
said that the budget submitted by the Board of Trustees is a 
tight and realistic one and that strongest efforts should be made 
for its legislative approval at the appropriate time. 

There being no further discussion, the meeting was 
adjourned at 12:25 p, 



m. 



Gladys ^Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



■ 



PRESENT: 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

February 4, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Room CC1-14, Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff ; Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler and 
Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Other Trustees : Trustees Breyer, Dennis, Eddy, Gavin, McNeil, 



Morgenthau and Rothenburger ; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding; Secretary Parks representing Governor Dukakis 

Absent Committee Member: Trustee Spiller 



Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 



ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President; Mrs. Hanson, Associate 
Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organi- 
zation and Management; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, 
The Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 



UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty Repre- 



sentative; Professor Patterson, Boyden Professor of the University 
UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Butcher; Dr. Wheeler, 



Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Hospital Chief of Staff; 
Professor Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Mr. Stockwell, 
Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital Director 






4821 



Revision of 
By-laws 



The meeting was called to order at 11:30 a.m. Chairman 
Healey asked Secretary Hardy to explain the reasons for four pro- 
posed votes amending the Trustee By-laws (Doc. T73-031) . Secretary (Doc. T73-031) 
Hardy recalled that the Trustees had, at their last meeting, voteq 
to establish a Committee on Health Affairs to oversee matters 
relating to health delivery and Hospital management. She also 
informed the Committee that the Nominating Committee would recom- 
mend to the full Board a merger of the Committees on Budget and 
Finance, since their areas of concern were so similar. The pro- 
posed votes would incorporate these two adjustments in the Com- 
mittee structure of the Board into the By-laws. 

Secretary Hardy continued that a number of other changes 
had been recommended and had been distributed to all Trustees, but 
that these were to be taken up at the March meeting in order to 
give all Trustees time to consider them thoroughly. Chairman 
Healey stressed that these changes were only proposals, and he 
asked that the Trustees provide the Secretary with their comments 



4S22 



Exec. Comm, 
2/4/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

once they had had an opportunity to study the proposed adjust- 
ments. 

Turning to the proposed By-laws changes to be considered 
in March, Trustee Robertson asked why Article II, Section 7, 
"Conduct of the Meeting," was to be deleted. Counsel Searson 
said that the right of a body to conduct its business with decorum 
is inherent in parliamentary procedure and need not be explicitly 
stated. He saw no good reason to anticipate disruptions in the 
By-laws. Trustee Breyer observed that if the By-laws imply that 
there must be formally-adopted rules of decorum, then logically 
an individual could take some disruptive action not expressly 
forbidden on the grounds that the rules of decorum do not prohibit 
it. Trustee Robertson accepted these explanations. 

There being no further comments about the changes to 
be discussed in March, a motion was made, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
vote: 

To strike the words "(4) Committee on Finance; 
(5) Committee on Budget" as appearing in Arti- 
cle III, Section 1 of T73-031 and insert in 
lieu thereof the following language: — (4) Com- 
mittee on Budget and Finance; (5) Committee 
on Health Affairs. 

To strike the words "The Committee on the 
Budget, and the Committee on Finance" as 
appearing in Article III. Section 4 (b) of 
T73-031 and insert in leiu thereof the follow- 
ing language: — and the Committee on Budget and 
Finance. 

To strike Section 9 and 11 of Article III, as 
appearing in T73-031, and insert in leiu thereof 
the following language: — 

SECTION 9. THE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE. 
The Committee on Budget and Finance shall have 
the following powers and duties: 

(a) To consider general policies relating to the 
formulation of budgets and the compensation 
policies for the several campuses and the 
University administration, and to make recom- 
mendations to the Board of Trustees with 
respect thereto. 

(b) To consider and act upon operating budget 
requests and capital outlay budget requests 



- 



f 



■ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

submitted by the several campuses and to 
make recommendations to the Board of Trustees 
with respect thereto. 

(d) To consider policies on annual merit increases 
and personnel staffing patterns, and to make 
recommendations to the Board of Trustees with 
respect thereto. 

(e) To enlist and advance the cooperation and 
participation of the Board of Trustees in 
facilitating favorable action on the Univer- 
sity budget by the General Court and the 
Executive department of the Commonwealth, 
and to make recommendations to the Board of 
Trustees with respect thereto. 

(f) To consider policies and other matters per- 
taining to the investment of the endowment 
funds and other funds of the University that 
may from time to time be invested and rein- 
vested, and to make recommendations to the 
Board of Trustees with respect thereto. 

(g) To consider and act upon proposals by the 
Treasurer for action which the Board of 
Trustees may have generally or specifically 
authorized the Treasurer to take regarding 
the investment portfolio of the University 
with the concurrence of the Committee on 
Budget and Finance. 

(h) To review the financial records and controls 
of the University; to review and develop 
policies respecting the receipt, management 
and disbursement of funds of the University 
from whatever source received, the purchase 
of services, supplies and materials, and 
internal controls over the same; to review 
proposals for tuition, fees, rents and 
charges; to consider policies and other 
matters pertaining to the leasing of pri- 
vate property by the University and to re- 
port thereon; and to make recommendations 
with respect thereto to the Board of 
Trustees 

(i) To consider the fidelity and performance 
bonding of University personnel and to 
report thereon, and to make recommendations 
with respect thereto to the Board of Trustees. 



4823 



Exec. Comm. 
2/4/76 



4824 



Exec. Comm. 
2/4/76 



Peninsula 
Development 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T76-041) 



Professional 

Non-Academic 

Staff Personnel 

Policy 

(Docs. T76-040, 

T73-090R) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

( j ) To review plans and programs to raise private 
funds for the University through special gifts, 
endowments, bequests and other means, and to 
make recommendations to the Board of Trustees 
with respect thereto. 

To amend Article III of T73-031 by inserting 
the following new section: — 

SECTION 11. THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS. 
The Committee on Health Affairs shall have the 
following powers and duties: 

(a) To review, consider, and make recommendations 
with respect to the health care and delivery 
systems of the University Medical Center at 
Worcester, including cooperative arrangements 
with State agencies and medical institutions. 

(b) To review and consider recommendations from 
the Hospital Management Board. 

Next the Chairman called on the President to explain 
the proposed Peninsula Development Trust Fund (Doc. T76-041) . 
President Wood informed the Committee that this was a proposal 
to establish a trust fund to provide for expenses related to the 
planning for the Kennedy Library on the Harbor Campus, and possibly 
for other improvements at Columbia Point. After a short discus- 
sion, it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Treasurer of the University be authorized to 
establish a Peninsula Development Trust Fund 
for the purpose of providing for expenses re- 
lated to the planning and construction of the 
John F. Kennedy Library and other development 
at the Columbia Point Peninsula. All expendi- 
tures from said trust fund shall be subject to 
the approval of the Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston and the con- 
currence of the President of the University. 
Further, that the sum of $7,500 be transferred 
to said trust fund from the Trustee Reserve 
Trust Fund Interest Account. 

The next item on the agenda was a proposal (Doc. T76- 
040) to reinstate the provisions of the Personnel Policy for 
Professional Non-Academic Staff (Doc. T73-090R) relating to multi 
year contracts. President Wood explained that these provisions 
had been temporarily suspended in June during the budget crisis 
as part of the austerity program. The adjustment had proved 
troublesome to the campus in some ways, however, and with the 



C 



I 



I 



I 



Meeting with 
Rules Committee 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

adoption of the FY 1976 Operating Budget and the FY 1977 request, 
sufficient knowledge of fiscal levels now existed to allow these 
provisions to be reinstated. After a brief discussion, a motion 
was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
upon the request of the President, as set 
forth in T76-040, the Board of Trustees rein- 
state, retroactive to June 25, 1975, the provi- 
sions of the Personnel Policy for Professional 
Non-Academic Staff (T73-090R) concerning multi- 
year contracts. 

The last item on the agenda was a discussion of arrange- 
ments for a meeting of the Executive Committee with the Rules 
Committee of the Faculty Senate to provide an opportunity for a 
frank exchange of views and concerns. There followed discussion 
as to the proper format of the meeting, and several Trustees said 
they hoped that specific issues for discussion would be determin- 
ed in advance. Chancellor Bromery pointed out that this was 
intended to be an informal, symbolic meeting, and not to be part 
of the governance process. A number of Trustees commented that 
they viewed this idea of faculty and Trustees meeting together 
very favorably, and they felt it would be an opportunity for 
better understanding of the problems facing the University. 

Trustee Rothenburger next spoke to the Committee about 
the discussion which had taken place at the January Executive 
Committee meeting on the election of student Trustees. Someone 
at that meeting, he said, had suggested that there ought to be a 
minimum number of students voting for a student Trustee to be 
certified. He recalled that he had expressed approval of the 
idea at the time, but had realized later that there was no pre- 
cedent for such a rule in any democratic election, and that he 
could not now support it. He pointed out that, under state law, 
any change in the procedure for election of a student Trustee 
would have to be approved by a majority vote of the students. 
He welcomed reasonable comments by the Trustee on the procedure 
for election of the student Trustees, and added that a study was 
under way for a possible restructuring of student governance on 
the Boston campus. 

Counsel Searson agreed with the legal point expressed b} 
Trustee Rothenburger that any change in student election procedure 
required a majority student vote. He observed that this had been 
the basis for the opinion concerning the legality of the recent 
election of the amherst student Trustee in light of an ad hoc 
procedure established by the Student Senate to resolve the problem 
caused when two persons were elected to the position of Student 
Government President. He further noted that the issue with re- 
spect to the Amherst campus did not appear to have been resolved 



Exec. Comm, 
2/4/76 



Student 
Trustees 



4826 



Exec. Comm. 
2/4/76 



UM/ Wore ester — 
Hospital Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gavin said the student attorney was establish- 
ing a position on this subject and said she would be in a better 
position to discuss the issues at a later meeting when the attor- 
ney was present. She asked that there be no further discussion 
of the matter at present. President Wood expressed the view that 
this problem would have to be resolved soon. 

There was a motion to adjourn, but Secretary Parks said 
it had been his understanding at the January 7 Executive Committee 
meeting that the Committee would discuss a ceiling on the Univer- 
sity Hospital budget at this meeting. Trustee Calrson, Chairman 
of the Budget Committee, explained that he planned to address 
Secretary Parks' concerns with a motion at the meeting of the 
full Board. The President explained that there was an explicit 
committment to a maximum expenditure of $3.5 million in the 
Operating Budget. 

There was no further discussion and the meeting was 
adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 



I 



Q/LUU* \U2L. IU— * 



MsladyS Keith Hardy ■ 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



■ 



ATTENDANCE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 4, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 
Room Al-1, Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustees Breyer, 
Croce, Morganthau, and Shaler; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Other Trustees: Trustees Burack, Dennis and Shearer 



Office of the President: Mr. Searson, General Counsel 



4S2? 



The meeting was called to order over luncheon at 1:00 UM/Amherst — 
p.m. Chairman Troy explained that the purpose of the meeting was! Preliminary 
the approval of the February, 1976 UM/Amherst Preliminary Gradua- !; Graduation Lists 
tion Lists (Doc. T76-042) . Under Chapter 75, the Trustees must (Doc. T76-042) 



take such a vote for the campuses to process the awards of degrees] . 
There was no discussion and, upon motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and ratify the preliminary graduation lists of 
February, 1976, UM/Amherst, as certified by the 
recorder of that campus and as set forth in Doc. 
T76-042. 

There was no other business, and the meeting was there- 
fore adjourned at 1:10 p.m. 



ftladyi Keith Hardy * 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4828 



ATTENDANCE: 



Energy 
Conservation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 17, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; Trustees Clark 
and Dennis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, 
recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Abrams, Burack, Eddy, Shearer 



and Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for Physical Planning 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Planning Director 



UM/Worcester : Mr. Greig, Director of the Physical Plant; Profes- 
sor Hittelman, Faculty Representative 

Guest: Richard Brunell, Student Intern 



The meeting was called to order at 11:18 by Chairman 



Spiller. 



The first item discussed was energy conservation. At 
the request of Chairman Spiller, Vice President Robinson opened 
the discussion, saying that at the present time energy conserva- 
tion was a critical problem in all non-profit institutions. A 
task force established by the American Council on Education, work- 
ing with two professional organizations, has found that energy 
costs for educational institutions have increased on an average 
of 150 percent over the past five years and this task force antic- 
ipates that there will be an additional 30 percent increase withiiji 
the next eighteen months. The University currently has under way 
some of the conservation measures recommended by the task force. 



Mr. Meehan, reporting for UM/Boston, said that there 
has been a major drive on energy conservation at the Harbor 
Campus. Very drastic changes have been made in methods of opera- 
tion. Both the amount of light and the amount of heat have been 
reduced to minimum acceptable levels. The length of time heating 
and ventilating units are run has been reduced, as has the amounts 
of outside air introduced into the ventilation systems. The 
results can be seen in reduced electricity bills, which indicate 
a savings in calendar year 1975 of just under $400,000 



I 



I 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



when compared with bills for the preceding year. Mr. Meehan 
said that with a capital outlay of between $250,000 and $300,000 
changes could be made to the heating and ventilation systems in 
laboratory areas and in the computerized systems for controlling 
the starting and stopping of ventilation systems which would 
result in additional savings approximating another $400,000 per 
year. 

Speaking for UM/Amherst, Mr. Littlefield said that in 
fiscal 1971 the total utility costs for the campus amounted to 
$2,400,000. The cost for fiscal 1976 is estimated at $7,300,000. 
Some of this increase is due to the addition of new buildings 
with air conditioning and large "cubage" bust most of the dollar 
differential reflects an increase in fuel costs. Unlike the 
Boston campus, UM/Amherst uses a combination of fuels. The most 
effective savings at UM/Amherst has resulted from the reduction 
in temperature in buildings. Whereas in the newer buildings the 
amount of heat can be controlled effectively, in some of the 
older buildings it is nearly impossible to regulate the tempera- 
ture. 

Mr. Greig said that at UM/Worcester , the problem is 
somewhat different. There is a supervisory data system for 
controlling the entire complex, but it has never been hooked up. 
It does effectively control the units in the hospital, but in 
the medical sciences building the systems in research wings, 
auditoriums and student laboratories have had to be manually shut 
off at night and on weekends. Trustee Dennis asked what possibil 
ity there was of persuading the Bureau of Building Construction 
to make haste to complete the project. Mr. Greig replied that 
although the systems in the two buildings were specified for com- 
patibility, they cannot be integrated without substantial addi- 
tional expenditures. This matter is being pursued with the BBC. 
Trustee Dennis asked for a progress report on this matter at the 
next meeting of the Committee. 

Another problem at UM/Amherst is that they have been 
shut off from natural gas. This means that oil, which is consid- 
erably more expensive, must be used to generate steam. Mr. Greig 
said that gas is not now available to industrial users in the en- 
tire Worcester area. Chairman Spiller suggested that a formal 
letter be written to Commonwealth Gas regarding the cut-off. 
Mr. Greig said that by the recent installation of a thermocycle, 
it had been possible to save approximately $630 per day of opera- 
tion. By adapting the turbo-generators so that they can be used 
for heating the building, a further saving has been achieved of 
approximately $56 per hour of operation. Further savings can be 
effected by reducing the amount of fluorescent lighting, and the 
necessary changes in individual fixtures will proceed as soon as 
the work can be scheduled. 



4S29 



B & G 2/17/76 



4830 



B & G 
2/17/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Clark asked if the vibration problem in the 
boilers had been resolved and was told that it had. 

Columbia Chairman Spiller next asked for a report on development 

Point at Columbia Point. Mrs. Robinson said that the Kennedy Library 
Developement Corporation now wants to locate the library on the northeast 

rather than the southeast portion of the University's land. This 
change in location, she said, would mean rethinking a number of 
factors, such as the circulation system. Trustee Clark said she 
looked favoraby upon the new site for the Library. Chancellor 
Golino said that he also found the proposed location entirely 
satisfactory. He said that a campus committee has been estab- 
lished to coordinate plans with the Kennedy Corporation. Mrs. 
obinson also informed the committee that the state is interested 
in the Harbor Campus site as a possible location for a new State 
Archives building. 



I 



UM/ Amherst — 
Permanent 
Financing of 
the Campus 
Center and 
Fraternity/ 
Sorority 
Park 



UM/ Amherst — 
Cooperative 
Family 
Housing 



The next agenda item to be discussed was the matter of 
permanent financing for two projects at UM/Amherst, the Campus 
Center and Fraternity/ Sorority Park. Mr. Post said that the two 
projects require different approaches. The Treasurer's Office 
and the UM/Amherst administration had developed a projection in- 
dicating that the Campus Center, which is an income-generating 
enterprise, is in a position to get long-term financing. Changes 
in the operation of the Center may make it unnecessary to increase 
student fees in order to go to permanent financing. On the other 
hand, Fraternity/Sorority Park does not generate income. This 
project was purchased originally for student housing. Since in 
addition to the purchase price, money was spent for architectural 
drawings, the sale of the land could not recover the money in- 
vested. Payment of the notes, therefore, must come from some 
existing source. Mr. Post said that both these projects will 
be discussed at the upcoming meeting of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance. 

Also to be discussed at the meeting of the Committee on 
Budget and Finance, he said, will be the matter of the proposed 
UM/Amherst cooperative housing agreement, which was discussed by 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds at its last meeting. 
Three of the major stumbling blocks have now been resolved. The 
potential problem of displacing union employees has been solved 
by the cooperative's agreeing to continue employing University 
personnel until such time as this issue can be resolved with the 
union. The problems of delegation of authority and of pledging 
the full faith and credit of the Commonwealth have been resolved 
by the University's retaining greater control over the coopera- 
tive. The rent schedule has been adjusted to assure proper re- 
serves for repairs and replacement. 



Chairman Spiller next asked for reports on the status 
of various campus projects and buildings. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4831 



Mrs. Robinson reported that working drawings are now 
ready on the gymnasium and since the foundation contract has not 
yet been put out to bid, it is probable that the Bureau of Build- 
ing Construction will want to put the entire project out for bid 
at one time. Mrs. Robinson said that it is her understanding 
that the project synopsis for the foundation contract was submit- 
ted to the Secretary of Educational Affairs in August for comment 
and that, to date, the Executive Office of Administrative Affairs 
has received no reply from the Secretary. The architect has now 
informed the Bureau and University personnel that his original 
construction cost estimates were too low. It will be necessary 
to make some cost reductions in the interior of the building and 
to bid the swimming pool as a deduct alternate. Construction of 
the pool will either go forward or be postponed until a later 
date, depending upon the actual bids. It is critical that the 
bidding and construction proceed on the tightest possible schedule 
since any delay will increase the costs of the project and there 
is no room for further cost reductions. Delay will also affect 
the opening date of the facility due to the construction calendar 

Chairman Spiller asked that the minutes reflect the 
very grave concern of the Committee about any delay in the re- 
lease of funds for the gym. Trustee Clark said that Secretary 
Parks had indicated to her that he had no objection to construc- 
tion of the gym and she offered to pursue this matter with 
Secretary Parks informally. Trustee Dennis also suggested an in- 
formal approach. It was the sense of the meeting that the Sec- 
retary to the Board would send a copy of the minutes of the 
Buildings and Grounds meeting to the Secretary of Educational 
Affairs calling his attention to the Committee's discussion. 



B & G 
2/17/76 

! UM/Boston — 
Gymnasium 



UM/Boston- 
Pumphouse 



Chairman Spiller asked Chancellor Golino to report on 
the status of plans for the Calf Pasture Pumphouse. Chancellor 
Golino said that a brochure will be forthcoming shortly on this 
building and that the students are enthusiastic about the possi- 
bility of its renovation as a community-student center. The 
problem of financing has still to be resolved. 

At the Chairman's request, Mr. Meehan reported that 
plans for an additional stop of the MBTA Quincy line at Columbia 
Point Station continue to be discussed with the MBTA. This would 
allow access to the UM/Boston shuttle bus facility via the over- 
head walkway. Plans include an elevator for the handicapped to 
reach the street level. 

Chairman Spiller asked Mr. Littlefield to report on the UM/ Amherst — 
status of various UM/ Amherst items. Mr. Littlefield reported j Library Tower 
that there is a problem of loose bricks on the University Library 
tower. The Bureau of Building Construction is requesting from 
the architect, Edward Durell Stone, an assessment of the cause of 
the problem and a cost estimate for correction. In the meantime 



UM/Boston — 
Bus and Park- 
ing System 



4832 



B & G 
2/17/76 



UM/Amherst— 

Tillson 
Power Plant 



UM/ Amherst — 

Bus System 



UM/ Amherst — 

Transformer 

Failure 



UM/Amherst — 
By-pass Road 



UM/Amherst — 

Handicapped 

Projects 

UM/Worcester 

Hospital 

Opening 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



a protective barrier has been erected. The building was complet- 
ed in 1972 and is no longer under guarantee. 

Mr. Littlefield said that the Tillson steam generation 
plant is not yet in operation due to problems with the steam tie 
line which have been discussed earlier with the Committee. A 
full engineering report requested by the BBC is due from the 
consultants this month. Until the report has been reviewed, it 
will not be certain what the problems are or the cost of correc- 
tion. 

With regard to the University bus system, Mr. Little- 
field said that three separate activities were under way: (1) prej 
paration of an agreement between the University and the Town of 
Amherst to provide bus service, (2) drafting of an application 
for the Town to submit to the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority 
asking them to hire the University of Massachusetts bus system 
to operate a service in the Town of Amherst and (3) preparation 
of a capital grant application to the federal government for the 
money to replace and augment the number of buses. It is antici- 
pated that the agreement with the Town, the PVTA application, anc 
the capital grant application will be presented to the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee for approval on April 20. 

The recent failure of a transformer at UM/ Amherst has 
left several buildings without reliable backup power. It is 
expected that the cost to replace this transformer will run be- 
tween $20,000 to $30,000. 



Mr. Littlefield brought the Committee up to date on 
the status of the Department of Public Works by-pass road. He 
said that plans have been under way for several years to build 
a by-pass so that the portion of North Pleasant Street which runs 
through the campus can be closed to all automobile traffic. In 
order to obtain federal funds for this road, a section of the 
land in Hadley which would be included in the new by-pass must 
be reclassified from rural to urban. The DPW is working with 
the town of Hadley to accomplish this. They have also started 
the land-taking process to acquire the right of way for the by- 
pass. 

Mr. Littlefield said that the state has allotted UM/Am- 
herst $160,000 for projects to benefit handicapped persons. 



Chairman Spiller next asked Mr. Greig to report on the 
status of projects at UM/Worcester. Mr. Greig reported that 
the hospital had opened on January 18, and there are now 28 
patients in two wings of the hospital. The Southwest wing is 
expected to open this week. By April 15 it is expected that 
levels 4, 5 and 6 will be turned over to the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Construction work under the hospital site and land- 
scaping contract has been discontinued due to the weather, but it 
is anticipated that it will be completed by July 1. It is hoped 
that limited outdoor recreational facilities, such as volleyball 
courts, may be provided as a part of future site work near the 
Medical Science building. Dr. Hittelman said that in the past 
the campus has used facilities of other organizations, but that 
the number of students has become too large to continue this 
practice without causing a hardship to those organizations and 
ill will for the University. 

Mr. Post reported that the Department of Public Works 
is hoping to improve Lake Avenue and the connection to Route 
1-290. The campus is working with the state and town agencies 
to provide signs directing people to the campus. 

It was noted that the committee may meet on March 3 
prior to the Board meeting in order to discuss land transfer 
legislation in connection with the Kennedy Library. It was 
suggested that members of the committee use the occasion of the 
April Board meeting in Amherst to inspect several buildings 
scheduled for formal University acceptance. The next regularly 
scheduled meeting of the Committee will take place on April 20. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned at 1:40 p.m. 



B & G 
2/17/76 

UM/ Wore ester-- 
Site Work and 
Recreational 
Facilities 



UM/Worcester- 
DPW Studies 



CGladyl Keith Hardy ° 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4834 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



I 



■ 



■ 



I 



PRESENT 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 18, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustee Breyer, 
Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; 



Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Burack, Fielding, Gavin, 
Morgenthau and Shaler 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Ms. Veith, Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Clayton, Head 
OF Department of Food and Agricultural Engineering; Professor 
Wilkinson, Faculty Representative; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chancel- 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Strange, Dean of the 
College of Public and Community Service; Professor Schiavo-Campo 
Faculty Representative 

Guest : Professor Alan A. Altshuler, Chairman of the Advisory 



4835 



Committee for the College of Public and Community Service, 
Professor of Political Science, Urban Studies, and Planning, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



The meeting was called to order at 10:20 a.m. The order 
of agenda was reversed, and Chairman Troy asked Vice President 
Lynton to provide an overview to the discussion of the Advisory 
Committee Report on the College of Public and Community Service 
at UM/Boston. Mr. Lynton stated that the Boston campus had 
originally been planned as a traditional liberal arts campus, but 
that in 1970-71 the Trustees had decided that the mandate of the 
campus should be broadened into professional areas. In December, 
1971 the Board had approved a revised report by a Committee 
appointed by then Chencellor Broderick which had recommended the 
establishment of a professional college. Dean Strange had been 
appointed in April, 1972 after which a planning year culminated 
in the admission of 280 students in September 1973. 



UM/Boston — 
Report on 
College III 



4836 



F&EP 
2/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The brevity of the planning phase was called a key 
factor in some of the birth pangs of College III, combined with 
the estraordinary range of innovative undertakings which it 
tackled all at the same time. Chancellor Golino had appointed 
the Altshuler Committee in February 1975, which reported in 
August 1975. He described the report as extremely useful to the 
campus and the President's office in addressing the critical 
question of how to introduce such great innovations in programs 
and evaluation while achieving a high standard of quality. 

Chairman Troy made the point that he hoped all responses 
to the Committee's report would be specific and that he hoped 
campus representatives could report on changes either currently 
in the works or in planning. He then called on Professor Altshuler 
for his remarks. 



Professor Altshuler began by noting that, considering 
the numerous tasks which the College undertook all at once, its 
first two years had displayed substantial if turbulent progress. 
He listed the main recommendations of the Committee: (1) that 
careful and sustained records be kept and that there be a better 
monitoring of data; (2) that the next two years be devoted to an 
evaluation of the College upon three criteria: (a) its capacity 
to generate applications from older, low- income students, (b) its 
capacity to reduce attrition, particularly as measured from the 
end of the initial assessment period, and (c) its capacity to 
turn out students comparable in reading, writing and analystical 
skills to those graduated by Colleges I and II; and (3) that a 
board of evaluators be established, composed of five to seven 
prestigious academicians, to review the performance of students 
about to graduate to determine their comparability with those 
graduating from Colleges I and II. 

Professor Altshuler then listed several subsidiary prob- 
lems: (1) the difficulty of prospective students understanding 
the expectations and requirements of the degree programs; (2) the 
difficulty of making personnel decisions when many of the faculty 
were from mixed or non-academic backgrounds; (3) the tendency of 
competency curriculum development to become an addiction rather 
than an instrument; and (4) the preoccupation with governance. 
Professor altshuler added that he understood that much progress 
had been made on the latter point. 

Chairman Troy thanked Professor Altshuler and described 
the Committee's report as extraordinarily comprehensive, careful, 
serious and well-written. He said the University was extremely 
grateful to him and his colleagues. 



■ 



* 



■ 



4837 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chancellor Golino said that he believed the physical 
isolation of College III to have been a mistake, and he said his 
principal desire was that the College could somehow be made a 
more integral part of the campus. He further said that he believe 
many of its problems had stemmed from trying to do too much too 
fast. He added his support for the principle of a board of eval- 
uators, not as a watchdog, but as a body to help insure the coor- 
dination and comparability of all the Colleges. 

Chairman Troy next called on Dean Strange, who began by 
describing the components of the College's mandate, and the ways 
in which they had been fulfilled. First, the college had been 
mandated to serve a student population which was primarily minor- 
ity and non-traditional. This objective had been fulfilled, he 
said, pointing out that 30 percent of the student body was non- 
white. Also, most worked full- or part-time and many were older 
than the faculty. 

A second mandate was to develop a curriculum in public 
and community service. This had been said to be most difficult, 
he said, but proved not to be difficult at all. He pointed out 
that the courses which composed this curriculum had been distrib- 
uted to the Committee. 



A third mandate had been to acquire a faculty with back- 
ground in either (or both) academic work or public and community 
service. Dean Strange said his objective had been a faculty which 
was about 25-50-25 percent made up of academics, those with mixed 
experience, and those without academic experience respectively. 
In fact, the first and third categories were somewhat smaller than 
this. The composition of the faculty, along with its unusual 
nature, posed some problems in that academics and nonacademic oftejn 
had widely differing working styles. 



There was also the problem of evaluating persons on non- 
academic background for the purpose of tenure. There are faculty 
who are low on research, but high on professional activities. 
Personnel rules, he said, are not really designed to assure such 
people that their efforts would be rewarded. Even though the 
Personnel Policy (T75-125) allows for substitution of profession- 
al activities for research, Dean Strange said, some faculty feel 
that the University may not quite mean it. This, he said, would 
be a knotty problem. Six faculty members would be due for tenure 
decisions this year, and it was important for the issue to be 
settled. The College now operates on the tenure system, but Dean 
Strange recalled that he had suggested the abolishment of the 
tenure system when the College was first established. 



F&EP 
2/18/76 



4838 



F&EP 
2/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Dean turned to a discussion of the competency 
approach to education. This was a most difficult problem he said, 
because certifying the competence of a person entailed a decision 
about what skills are valued; it also requires great specificity. 
He outlined the two models in competency-based education: credit 
for time in place, which would give a person credit for the time 
he had spent in a given position, or credit for what the individ- 
ual can do in terms determined by the institution. College III 
had chosen the latter method. It had not had specific descriptions 
of the competencies when the College opened, but had since develop- 
ed them. This took an excessive amount of time and effort, but a 
mechanism has been developed. This is now in place and is a stab! 
assessment process. He explained that the competency of an in- 
dividual is judged by a panel of faculty based on clear criteria. 

Dean Strange said the College was in agreement with mosl 
of the Altshuler Committee's conclusions. It differed strongly, 
however, with the contention that there was a lack of field-based 
experience for the students. He described two programs, one 
through their Law Center Clinic and the other in the Boston Environ- 
mental Health Improvement Project, both of which involved a mix- 
ture of study and work. He said that the College was proud of 
its progress in this area. 

He added his agreement with the needs outlined by the 
Committee: the lack of adequate data for evaluation of the 
College; the need for better recruitment procedures; the need 
to address the attrition problem; and the need for resolution 
of the governance problem. On this last point, Dean Strange 
remarked that, although he agreed with the Committee's conclusion, 
the problem had been resolved since its report had been made in 
August 1975. Governance had been a preoccupation for everyone 
and absorbed an undue amount of energy, but a culture of trust 
has been built and the situation is much improved. 



A period of questions, answers and discussion followed. 
Trustee Breyer cited two areas — law and economics — where the 
competencies set forth in the brochure did not seem to correspond 
to the courses offered. Dean Strange noted that the courses for 
the law center were contained in a different course brochure than 
the one provided. In the area of economics, he agreed, and point- 
ed out that the structuring of faculty responsibility at the 
College had been based on assumptions about growth which had 
never materialized. It is difficult for thirty-six faculty to 
provide both basic and advanced courses while at the same time 
supervising the acquisition of competencies for over 400 students 
The College is committed to liberal arts education as well as 



• 



§ 



■ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



professional career education, and there is a tension between 
them. Chancellor Golino said that an important objective is to 
bring the faculties of Colleges I and II together with that of 
College III, so that the students can benefit from the offerings 
in the other Colleges. College III students do not now take 
courses in the other Colleges. Dean Strange added that the 
student/faculty ratio is 19.6:1. 

Chairman Troy asked about the skills of College III 
students in reading, writing and analysis. Dean Strange respond- 
ed that they have integrated the basic skills program into the 
total curriculum and he felt the skills of College III students 
compared favorably with those of other UM/Boston students. 

Professor Altshuler said that his Committee had also 
been concerned about the problem of meshing career development 
in jobs at the public service agencies together with educational 
development. He said that faculty might have a tendency to do 
what comes easiest, which is teaching courses in academic sub- 
jects. He felt that a fruitful relationship could exist between 
job and academic programs and that economies could result. He 
said that it is sometimes necessary to keep the pressure on, 
and he said he believed that Dean Strange had done so. He point- 
ed out that the College had a commitment to academic subjects as 
well as professional skills, which explained its desire not 
simply to be a trade school. 

Chairman Troy noted that the Altshuler Committee had 
stressed what he termed "the failure" of College III to success- 
fully mesh the work and study aspects of the programs so that 
work performed complemented study. He asked Dean Strange whether 
this did not constitute a serious failure, if such a meshing was 
central to the educational concept upon which the College was 
based. If there was such a failure, he continued, was it due to 
shortcomings in personnel or in a shortage of positions in public 
agencies? 

Dean Strange answered by describing the centralized 
field education format which had had to be scrapped because it 
did not work. Since last spring, he said, the several centers of 
the College had conducted their own field education activities, 
and he described the process by which this was done and how it 
was an improvement over the old, centralized system. Recapit- 
ulating Dean Strange's explanation as he understood it, Trustee 
Breyer asked whether the process now involved two aspects: (1) 
seeking out persons who held positions in public service to be- 
come students, and (2) seeking out slots in public agencies for 
students to fill. Dean Strange confirmed this understanding, 
and then explained why this second process had proved to be 
difficult: (1) the positions were more often nonpaying than pay- 
ing, (2) the jobs which agencies want filled are often irrelevant 



4839 



F & EP 
2/18/76 



4840 



F & EP 
2/18/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Establishment 
of a Bachelor 
of Science 
Degree in Food 
Engineering 
(Doc. T76-045) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



to the curriculum, and (3) many public agencies are overwhelmed 
with requests for training-type positions. The difference between, 
an internship and simply a job is an important one. It was noted 
that 80 percent of the students have full-time jobs. Chairman 
Troy asked Professor Altshuler whether he believed this work and 
study concept was at all workable, and he replied affirmatively. 

The question was raised as to the method of determining 
whether the work that a student is performing in a public agency 
is fruitful to his learning objective. Dean Strange replied that 
faculty maintain oversight of the work situation to ensure that 
the two correlate. He said visits might be as frequent as once 
a week. 

On the subject of recruiting, Chairman Troy expressed 
his objection to advertising College III in newspapers at a time 
when hundreds of applicants must be turned away from Colleges I 
and II. How does this look to a parent of a rejected student? 
was pointed out that the recruitment process does not involve 
"selling" the College, but merely in placing before the public the: 
educational opportunities which are available. Dean Strange said 
he believed that this was an obligation of a public institution, 
and he pointed out that the non-traditional students need to be 
informed of educational opportunities in a fashion different from 
high school students who may have guidance counselors within their 
schools. He mentioned that the College conducts admissions semi- 
nars every Tuesday morning and Wednesday evening. 

The Chairman asked Professor Altshuler if he had any 
concluding remarks, and Professor Altshuler said he believed that 
the College was grappling with the right issues, that there had 
been good progress made since the report was issued, and that a 
lack of resources had undoubtedly slowed progress on some of the 
critical issues identified by the report. 

Chairman Troy thanked Dean Strange and Professor Alt- 
shuler and turned the meeting to a proposal for the Establishment 



of a Bachelor of Science Degree in Food Engineering at the Amhers : 
campus (Doc. T76-045) . Vice President Lynton said that this new 
degree program would combine resources of the School of Engineer- 
ing and the College of Food and Natural Resources, although it 
was to be based at the latter. He observed that the establish- 
ment of this new program would replace the B.S. program in Food 
and Agricultural Engineering, which he described as a wise move 
in light of the Board's action in limiting the enrollment of the 
Amherst campus, which suggests the advisability of new programs 
replacing old ones. Those students currently majoring in Agri- 
cultural Engineering will be allowed to complete their studies, 
after which a proposal for formal elimination of the degree pro- 
gram will be brought to the Trustees. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Colby, representing Trustee Winthrop , asked whether 
the new program would replace an agricultural program at a time 
when the Commissioner of Agriculture and the Secretary of Environ' 
mental Affairs are promulgating a policy for food and agriculture 
in Massachusetts — a first in the history of the Commwealth — with 
the goal of making Massachusetts more nearly self-sufficient in 
its requirements for foodstuffs. Professor Clayton explained 
that the change represented a recognition by the faculty of the 
need for trained personnel in the food processing industry. It 
will be the first undergraduate program in food engineering in 
the United States. This degree program reflects an expansion of 
scope within the department over the past decade and is consist- 
ent with the curriculum, faculty resources and employment needs 
in the region. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
establish a Bachelor of Science Degree 
in Food Engineering at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as described in 
Doc. T76-045. 



There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




ladyj 



Keith Hardy 




Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4841 



F&EP 
2/18/76 



4842 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OE MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

February 18, 1976; 1:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Carlson, Trustees Croce, 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



Dennis, Gordon, Rothenburger , Troy; Treasurer Johnson; Secretary 
Hardy; Ms. Judd, recorder 

Other Trustees: Trustee Gavin 



Committee Members Absent: Trustees Rowland and Shearer 



Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice 
President for Organization and Management; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assist 
ant, Budget Office; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for Physi- 
cal Planning; Mr. Sear son, General Counsel; Mr. White, The Assist-' 
ant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel-' 



lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; Professor Wilkin- 
son, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Budget Director; 



Mr. Olson, Acting Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance 
UM/Worcester : Professor Hittelman, Faculty Representative 



Guests : Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer and Wood; Ms. Susan Tehan 



representing Secretary Parks; Mr. Pat Walker of the University of 
Massachusetts Tenants' Association; Mr. Michael Pill of the 
Campus Center Board of Governors; Ms. Cynthia Blair, Mr. Jim 
Brandt, Mr. Jerry Rogers, UM/ Amherst; Mr. Richard Brunell, student 
intern, President's Office; Mr. Ira Horowitz of the Student Legal 
Services Office, UM/Amherst 



The meeting was called to order at 1:35 p.m. Chairman 
Carlson began by asking Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer and Wood, 
investment counsel, for his comments on the current University 
Endowment Fund Portfolio. Mr. Wodd referred to the draft of Pol- 
icy Guidelines which had been previously distributed to the Com- 
mitee and said that, in view of the past year's activities, his 
proposal was to revise the stock ratio upwards by five percent 
and to bring the equity ratio down by three percent. Mr. Janis 
concurred with Mr. Wood's recommendations. Mr. Wood then indi- 
cated that the next analysis would be available in April. 



> 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After a discussion of various investment options, the 
Chairman asked for a vote on the proposed changes in the Univer- 
sity's portfolio. In accordance with the vote of the Board of 
Trustees of June 30, 1966, empowering Kenneth W. Johnson, as 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, to take certain 
actions relative to the endowment and trust funds of the Univer- 
sity, it was moved, seconded and 



4843 



B & F 
2/18/76 



VOTED 



To authorize and empower Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
to execute the following transactions: 

1. To sell the following securities: 



Hercules Inc. 
AMAX Inc. 
Wisconsin Gas 



800 shares 
400 shares 
180 shares 



2. 



To purchase, with the proceeds from the 
sale of the Hercules Inc., AMAX Inc., and 
Wisconsin Gas securities, the following 
securities : 



$50,000 U.S. Treasury, 8%, 2/15/83 



Following Mr. Janis's observations with regard to the 
present market situation and the attractiveness of current Federa 

Bond issues, Mr. Wood concurred with his suggestion for the sale 
of some corporate bond holdings. After a motion was made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
on advice of the investment counsel and with 
the concurrence of the Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs, to sell bonds 
presently held in the portfolio in an amount 
not to exceed $50,000 and to invest the pro- 
ceeds thereof in GNMA securities. 



Chairman Carlson then turned to the second agenda item, 
a review of the State Auditors' Reports. He reviewed them briefly 
and commented generally upon the campuses' responses to the 
Reports . 

Trustee Dennis then asked about the status of the 
Coopers and Lybrand audits of the School of Education at UM/ Am- 
herst. Treasurer Johnson replied that the audits have been re- 
viewed in great detail, and new procedures have been put into 
effect on the campus. Mr. Janis said that a further report to 



State Auditors' 
Reports 



4844 



B & F 
2/18/76 



Establish- 
ment of 
Robert J. 
McCartney 
Endowment 
Fund 



Status of 
Trust Fund 
Interest 
Account 



Critical 

Needs 

Process 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the Committee would be made at its April meeting. 

The next item for discussion was the Establishment of 
I the Robert J. McCartney Endowment Fund. It was pointed out that 

this scholarship is intended for orphans and is available on a 
| campus-wide basis. A motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Robert J. McCartney Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund for Orphans be established as an 
Endowment Fund for the purpose of making 
annually one or more awards to the nearest 
$100.00 from income earned during the pre- 
ceding fiscal year to aid industrious and 
deserving students enrolled at any campus 
of the University. Selection of recipients 
shall be made by the campus committees on 
scholarships and financial aid and reviewed 
by the Treasurer of the University and by 
the Vice President for Management and Busi- 
ness Affairs or as the Board of Trustees 
may from time to time direct. Awards shall 
be made to needy and deserving students who 
do not have parents; he or she shall also 
be born in Massachusetts and be a permanent 
resident thereof for a period of one year 
prior to the academic period for which the 
grant is made. Unused income remaining 
after annual awards have been made shall 
be added to the principal of the fund at 
the close of the fiscal year. 

Chairman Carlson turned next to the status of the Trust 
Fund Interest Account. He said that, as a result of the severe 
shortage of appropriations in the past year, the University had 
turned to non-state sources of funding. The Operating Budget had 
included $272,000 as reserves; he reviewed in detail expenditures 
and commitments since July against the amount, as well as antic- 
ipated expenditures. Treasurer Johnson commented that unless 
short-term interest rates go up substantially and unless the 
amount of money available for investment goes up, there is the 
possibility of a drastic curtailment in available funds in this 
account next year. To counteract this situation, the University 
has developed a more sophisticated program of short-term invest- 
ments. 

At the Chairman's request, Mr. Janis reviewed for the 
Committee current developements in the critical needs process. 
His points were (1) the critical needs submitted in December have 
finally been approved, (2) there are problems relative to the 
anticipated critical needs for September, and (3) there is a 



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\ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



1 



need to set up a budget tracking system so that the critical 
needs which have been approved can be funded within the available 
budgets for FY 1976. After reviewing critical needs provisions 
and the University's responses to them, along with its self-impo- 
sed austerity program, Mr. Janis said that personnel problems do 
exist throughout the campuses. He pointed out that salary deci- 
sions have been decentralized and now lie within the province of 
the Chancellors; guidelines for filling vacant positions are 
being developed based upon interpretations of the General Counsel 
and will be available shortly. Problems remaining are (1) low 
morale as a result of personnel restriction, (2) a high vacancy 
rate, and (3) anticipated vacancy problems in the fall. He said 
that an attempt will be made to get a blanket approval for permis- 
sion to fill a certain number of anticipated critical needs — a 
necessity at this time since the campuses must begin now to make 
commitments to faculty for availability in September. This will 
require understanding on the part of Administration and Finance 
for the unique problems of higher education. 

In response to a question from Chairman Carlson, Mr. 
Daplan said that the critical needs process will probably con- 
tinue throughout the next fiscal year. Chancellor Bromery said 
that a problem for the campuses is the inability to make long- 
range decisions and that, in the long run, the students are the 
ones most affected by the University's inability to project the 
number of available faculty for the next semester's classes. He 
pointed out that by the time his December critical needs were 
approved by Administration and Finance, the second semester had 
already started and it was too late to get faculty for courses 
students needed. Another problem is that while some positions 
in the classified staff can be filled by transfer, that position 
from which the transfer came cannot be filled, thus creating 
another vacancy. 



I 



Chairman Carlson then asked Chancellor Bromery to 
report on program decisions under consideration at UM/ Amherst. 
Chancellor Bromery reviewed past methods of decision-making, and 
then explained the current method of "dollar budgeting" whereby 
resources are mapped against program activities in order to 
provide effective allocation of resources. Each budgetary unit 
is monitored by a program manager whi is responsible for accom- 
plishing program objectives and who has flexibility in moving 
funds among accounts and for reallocating personnel budgets 
to non-personnel expenses. The "dollar budgeting" system was 
introduced in 1973, and is now in a stage where activity-indica- 
tors are being developed to measure the accomplishments of the 
planned program. Mr. Gulko pointed out that cost-indicators are 
being worked out, as well as class size- indicators, and faculty 
workload-indicators. Developing a system of quality-indicators 
remains a difficult problem. In response to a question from 
Chairman Carlson, Chancellor Bromery said that a summary of 



4845 



B & F 
2/18/76 



UM/Amherst — 
1976 Program 
Decisions 



4846 



B & F 
2/18/76 



UM/Boston — 
Proposed Agree 
merit for a 
Cooperative 
Program in 
Management 
between UM/ 
B oston and 
Northeastern 
University 
(Doc. T76-046) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



program adjustments, as of a point in time, would soon be 
available. He also said that an effect of this system's implement 
ation has been to make very clear that at some point very soon, 
student enrollment will have to be related to the budget. 

The next item for discussion was the Proposed Agree- 
ment for a Cooperative Program in Management between UM/Boston 
and Northeastern University (Doc. T76-046) . Mr. Lynton reviewed 
the previous Committee and Board actions regarding preliminary 
negotiations of the contract. He said that the Agreement makes 
a great deal of sense educationally, in that students of College 
IV could be offered more courses than would otherwise be possible. 
He suggested that, in the future, contracts of this sort ought to 
be negotiated on the basis of marginal cost to the delivery insti- 
tution rather than base cost; however, the basic principles of 
the present contract are very sound. Chancellor Golino said 
that the contract was now ready for signature, and that he is 
happy and confident that the arrangement will work well. An en- 
couraging point, he said, is that Northeastern University is 
already asking if similar relationships in other programs could 
develope. 

Chairman Carlson said that this arrangement was tangible 
evidence of viable interinstitutional cooperation and sets a 
good example for other institutions, both public and private. Mr 
Janis added that the conditions previously set by the Board have 
been met and another item added: the right of the University of 
Massachusetts to terminate the contract with 30 days' notice in 
the event that College IV decides to set up courses of its own 
in these areas. His only concern was that in House I, this item 
had been eliminated from the budget proposal; a way to restor the 
funds has to be found. In response to Trustee Troy's inquiry, 
Chancellor Golino said that approximately 130 students, out of 
an enrollment of 225, would be involved in the program. Counsel 
Searson noted that in the Agreement there was a $40,000 funding 
limitation for academic year 1976-77 and that he assumed funding 
limitations would be worked out in subsequent years; Chancellor 
Golino said that his assumption was correct. Chancellor Golino 
added that the Agreement was made only for very specialized 
courses which UM/Boston did not inted to offer, and that, if it 
should offer them, it would cost much more to acquire the core 
faculty necessary. A motion was made, seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the agreement (Doc. T76-046) negotiatied between 
the administration of the Boston campus and 
Northeastern University for a cooperative 
program in management allowing UMass/Boston 
students to enroll in advanced elective 
courses in management at Northeastern 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



which are not currently offered at 
UMass/Boston; further, to authorize 
the Treasurer of the University and 
the Chancellor of the Boston campus 
to execute said agreement. 

At Trustee Gordon's request, at 2:45 p.m., it was 
moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To enter executive session to dis- 
cuss the University of Massachusetts 
Tenants' Association Management /Main- 
tenance Agreement . 

At 3:05 p.m., it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : 



To end the executive session. 



Mr. Janis began discussion of the next topic, Campus 

Center Financing (Doc. T76-947). He said that for five years, 
the Campus Center and the Campus Center Garage have been in temp- 
orary financing, but according to legislative limitation, perma- 
nent financing must be arranged by June, 1976. Additional short- 
term financing is not available at the present time for this 
type of project; however, there is a good chance that long-term 
financing could be obtained. A detailed analysis had been made 
which indicated that a long-term bond issue of $21,550,000 for 
35 years could be supported at an effective rate of 8^ percent, 
the rate furnished by the UMass Building Authority. Four signif- 
icant elements of this analysis were: (1) past surpluses would 
be carried forward each year, (2) rents would be charged to the 
bookstore operation and the food service operation, (3) a student 
fee increase of $10 per year would begin in 1978 (this fee could 
be obviated by the development of a conference center program 
which would provide additional income to the Campus Center) , and 
(4) there would be an increase in project revenues at a rate of 
five percent and a corresponding increase in operating expenses 
of five percent. 

Chancellor Bromery pointed out that the Campus Center 
has existed for a long enough time so that there is now a well- 
documented history of viability of enterprises within the build- 
ing — a positive factor for prospective bond purchasers. Because 
of the time limitations involved (the current notes fall due 
April 15, 1976), and permanent financing must be arranged immedi- 
ately. 

Treasurer Johnson commented on the significant improve- 
ment in the management of the Campus Center. He said this fact 
makes the Center more attractive from a financing point of view, 
since the data shows that it can stand on its own. 



4847 



B & F 
2/18/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Campus Center 
Financing 
(Doc. T76-047) 



^j 



4848 



B & F 
2/18/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Financing of 
Fraternity 
Sorority Park 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman referred to questions raised by a paper 
from the Student Government Association distributed by Trustee 
Gavin regarding the estimated revenues from the proposed commercial 
bank. He asked if the exclusion of such a bank and its potential 
revenues would adversely affect the financial projections. 
Treasurer Johnson replied that it was insignificant. Another 
questions was whether institutional money would be going into the 
Center, thus indicating a change in funding patterns. Mr. Gulko 
said that the change was an accounting change connected with the 
profit center concept; the net overall balance of the costs of 
revenues and expenditures is not changed — they rather are classi- 
fied differently. 

Trustee Gavin expressed her concern that the proposal 
included an item such as the bank since both the Graduate Student 
Senate and the Student Government Association had rejected the 
bank as a tenant. If there are major changes in store for the 
Campus Center, such as the conference center idea, students want 
to be informed about them and want a say in them. 

Chancellor Bromery replied that the contemplated changes 
are in a preliminary state and that they would not take place 
until discussions were held with all constituent groups. The ovei 
all purpose is to find any academically appropriate enterprise 
that will help to offset the burden of Campus Center fees on 
students. If a conference center or continuing education center 
were set up, students would benefit from the additional courses 
offered thereby and from conference-generated revenues. He em- 
phasized that discussions would be held on the campus prior to 
implementation of these ideas. 

Chairman Carlson said that the bank issue was an option 
which could be talked about further after the bond sale. He 
called for a motion which was seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority to seek permanent fin- 
ancing for Project #11 (Campus Center and 
Campus Center Garage) at available market 
rates for a total of $21,550,000 including 
the present note ($21,030,000), capital 
improvements ($250,000) and capitalization 
of the current debt ($270,000). 



On the subject of the financing of Fraternity-Sorority 
Park, Mr. Janis said the campus is still investigating the pro- 
blem of paying for the notes which fall due in April. Two option^ 
under consideration are: (1) whether surpluses in the Building 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Authority could be used for purchasing them, and (2) whether or 
not to use Residence Hall Trust Funds, the legality of which is 
under consideration by General Counsel. Trustee Troy reminded 
the Committee that this project which is also under temporary 
financing and the notes fall due on April 15. 



4849 



B & F 
2/18/76 



UM/ Amherst — 
Proposed 

Management /Main- 
tenance Agree- 
ment 



The last agenda item was the Management and Maintenance 
Agreement with the Student Family Housing Cooperative (Doc. T76- 
048). Mr. Janis reviewed the negotiations which led to the pro- 
posal before the Committee. The concept had been approved in 
principle for further exploration by the Board of Trustees; the 

results of those explorations have taken the form of the proposed (Doc. T76-048) 
Agreement, with several safeguards added: (1) violation of any 
part of the Agreement will constitute its termination, (2) the 
Agreement can also be terminated if the monies collected each 
month vary by five percent of the budget, (3) the University of 
Massachusetts Tenants' Association will provide a $100,000 fidel 
ity bond, (4) liability insurance is provided for $1,500,000 
(5) the University has the right of inspection at all times, (6) 
a bank shall receive the rents and transmit them directly to the 
University, (7) a majority of the tenants will ratify the Agree- 
ment, (8) the Agreement must be approved by the Building Authority 
and (9( all withheld rental monies will be remitted. With regard 
j to the last point, recent communications indicated that monies 
withheld only during the months of January and February would be 
remitted, and Mr. Janis recommended that negotiations not proceed 
until it is agreed that all monies be turned over. 

Trustee Gordon congratulated Mr. Janis for his handl- 
ing of this complex problem. He said that conceptually the idea 
of the cooperative was a good one; his reservation involved pro- 
tection of bond-holders should there be another rent stricke. 
He recommended wording changes to this effect in paragraphs 5 and 
27. 

Treasurer Johnson commented on the excellent presenta- 
tion on the part of the students, but said that as financial 
officer of the University, he was disturbed by some of the basic 
principles involved. This Agreement, he said, is not in con- 
formance with the type which normally would be entered into with 
professional management organizations which would provide a 
performance bond, with which contractual obligations could be 
clearly stated, and which could guarantee no conflict of interest 
Because of the nature of student transiency, the changing compo- 
sition of the cooperative raised questions in his mind of long- 
term performance and continued interest. These policy questions 
should be discussed before any final decision is made. 

Trustee Dennis said that the Agreement read to him more 
like a management agreement than a cooperative. In his experi- 
ence, management fees are usually six to ten percent of the rents 



4850 



B & F 
2/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



collected; the fee before the Committee appears to be quite a bit 
higher than this. He added that successful management companies 
usually operate with a large volume of property over which costs 
are spread. He questioned successful student management under a 
restricted fee, coupled with a lack of practical experience. 

Mr. Walker responded for the University of Massachusetts 
Tenants' Association by saying that the management costs appear 
to be high because maintenance costs are included; taking this 
into account, the management fee is about five percent. Trustee 
Dennis said that, again, for a successful management company, 
that figure would be too low. Mr. Walker replied that this is a 
cooperative rather than a professional company; being a coopera- 
tive would enable them to reduce traditional fees. With regard 
to the policy questions raised by Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Walker 
said that the cooperative would be governed by a Baord of Direc- 
tors with a full-time staff, thereby providing for long-term 
stability. On the questions of transiency, he pointed out that 
the housing is for married students who stay for an average of 
three to four years on a year-round basis — a different population 
mix than that of campus dormitories. He said also that a Minne- 
sota cooperative, run along similar lines as those proposed, has 
been very successful. Some of its members have been advising the 
UMTA, thus representing experienced support which can be utilized 
if necessary. 

Trustee Dennis asked if enough people would be involved 
in the actual operation to justify its being an educational exper^- 
ience. Mr. Walker replied that having all members involved in 
the actual daily managing processes would preclude efficiency. 
However, all members of the cooperative would have a voice in 
priority setting and gain from that experience. 

In line with Trustee Dennis's questions about rent 
scales, Mr. Walker said that rents are going to be reduced this 
year but whether or not they will be reduced in succeeding years 
depends upon results of negotiations of the up-coming union con- 
tract. Mr. Horowitz pointed out that the members of the coopera- 
tive believe that rents will always be lower, under student 
management, than they would have been under University aegis. 

Chairman Carlson said that while the negotiators had 
worked long and hard to produce the Agreement, further consider- 
ation should be given it before recommending it to the Board of 
Trustees. After extensive discussion, it was decided to submit 
the Agreement with revisions as suggested at today's meeting to 
Counsel for the Building Authority for his informal review. The 
Committee agreed to meet on March 2 at 2:30 to consider the Agree 
ment , as amended, for vote. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 4:20 p.m. 




(60LV 




iladys w Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



' 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

February 24, 1976; 12:00 p.m. 

Faculty Conference Room 

University of Massachusetts/Worcester 



Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Robertson: Trustee Abrams 



Croce and McNeil, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding, 
Dr. Kanner representing Trustee Okin; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Eller, 
Associate Vice President for University Policy; Ms. Veith, Staff 
Assistant 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Butcher; Professor 



4851 



Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Mr. Brennan, Student Representa 
tive 



The meeting was called to order at 12:30 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson asked first for a progress report on the University Hos- 
pital. Chancellor Bulger said that there were now thirty-five 
patients, which he said was more than had been expected at this 
point. He reiterated the plan to add beds only when the census 
requires it, in order to contain the deficit as much as possible. 
Chancellor Bulger then informed the Committee that he had asked 
Professor Butcher to accept the position as Associate Dean for 
Scientific Affairs. 

The Chairman turned next to the proposed Establishment ; UM/Worcester— 
of a Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of MassaH Department of 
chusetts at Worcester (Doc. T76-049) . Vice President Lynton ini- j Laboratory 
tiated the discussion by reviewing for the Committee the recent Medicine 
history of the departmental structure. The previous Chancellor 
had brought to the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy a 
proposed list of departments which had numbered more than sixty. 
This list had been revised downward under Acting Dean Butcher and 
presented to the Committee as an informational item in April 1975 
At that time the proposed number was twenty-eight. Of the depart- 
ments on the list, only Laboratory Medicine had not been estab- 
lished by the Board. As a procedural matter, the Faculty and Ed- 
ucational Policy Committee would make the formal recommendation 
to the full Board, but it was felt that the Committee on Health 
Affairs should discuss it and advise the Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee. 



Chancellor Bulger explained that Laboratory Medicine has 
traditionally been a subunit with the Department of Pathology, but 
that in the last fifteen years there has been an increasing trend 
in medical schools toward setting it up as a separate department. 



4852 



Health Affairs 
2/24/76 



University 

Health 

Programs 



UM/Worcester- 
Hospital 
Management 
Board 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The functions of the department would be threefold: 
(1) the education of medical students, (2) the development and 
evaluation of actual tests, and (3) the performance of the same 
kind of service function for the community and the state which the 
School as a whole was attempting to perform. These service func- 
tions would be charged to the Hospital budget. 

Dr. Kanner observed that in order to train technicians 
for modern medical laboratories it would be necessary to acquire 
equipment which would permit services greater than the Hospital 
would need. Therefore, this provided an opportunity for useful 
cooperation with other state agencies. Mrs. Bluestone seconded 
this comment, and mentioned the varied programs to be offered at 
the new state medical laboratories in Boston. She added that 
there has not yet been the kind of conversations between the 
Medical School and the state which she said should take place as 
this program is implemented. Dr. Bulger said that this may have 
been the result of some of the difficulties of starting up the 
Hospital, and he added that such interface activities would be the 
responsibility of one of the new vice chancellors now being sought 
Professor Butcher said he agreed with the need for this kind of 
cooperation, but he stressed that the primary purpose of the De- 
partment of Laboratory Medicine was the education of medical stu- 
dents, and that the training of laboratory technicians would be 
a later development . 

There was further discussion of organizational details 
and services of the department and the effect the separation would 
have on the Department of Pathology. Chancellor Bulger said he 
saw no problem for Pathology in the separation. It was the sense 
of the Committee that the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee 
should vote to recommend approval of this program to the full Board 



Mrs. Bluestone raised the issue of coordination of health 
programs on the several campuses. She said she had learned from 
a brochure that the School of Public Health in Amherst had set up 
a new program to train directors of state public health laborator 
ies, which she thought was an esoteric concentration which might 
be unwise. She said that she thought such programs should be 
developed in conversation with the Department of Public Health, 
and added that she had little sense of the different programs 
available on the campuses. Mr. Lynton said he suspected this was 
a concentration rather than a full-scale program, and he said he 
would look into it. Both he and Vice President Robinson stated 
that one of the tasks ahead was to determine where the Medical 
Center goes from here, and that this would be the work of both 
the Health Affairs and Long-Range Planning Committees. 

The meeting next turned to the matter of composition of 
the Hospital Management Board (HMB) of the University Hospital. 
Vice President Lynton recalled that the Executive Committee of thej 
Board of Trustees had approved the Hospital By-Laws (Doc. T76-034A1) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4853 



Health Affairs 
2/24/76 



at the January 7, 1976 meeting, which had contained the establish- 
ment of a management Board to advise the Chancellor, the President 
and the Trustees on policies and management of the University Hos- 
pital. Now it was appropriate for this Committee to address itself 
to the kinds of members the HMB should have. He said that Chair- 
man Healey would need the names of individuals in order to appoint 
them with the concurrence of the Trustees at the April meeting. 

Associate Vice President Eller pointed out that there 
would be three categories of members of the HMB: appointive, 
elective and ex officio . One of the issues for the Health Affairs 
Committee to address was the membership of Trustees. The Presi- 
dent felt that members of the Health Affairs Committee should 
serve on the HMB, but there was a question of whether the Committe|e 
as a whole should be caught up with the day to day operations of 
the Hospital, or whether its members who serve on the HMB should 
work with its other members in addressing these details. 

A second question, he said, was whether the Trustees 
would wish the eight appointive members of the HMB, which would 
come from outside the University, to be selected from across the 
state, rather than just the Worcester area. He said that it was 
pretty clear that there was a need for persons with experience in 
management of Health or related institutions. He concluded that 
he hoped to have both categories of persons and a process to re- 
ceive names of persons to provide to Chairman Healey as a result 
of today's discussion. 



There followed a long discussion of the types of persons 
needed and the skills such persons should have. Dr. Kanner pro- 
posed the following list of skills, which he said was not intended 
to correspond numerically to individuals: (1) account and fin- 
ance, (2) personnel management, (3) management of facilities, (4) 
law, (5) information systems, (6) government, (7) insurance. He 
said that sources for persons with such skills might be (1) health 
institutions, (2) academic institutions and (3) government insti- 
tutions. Other types of persons mentioned were a person to re- 
present consumer interests and a person who has managed one of 
the many crisis center-type professionals in the Worcester area, 
which could be merged into one category. 

There seemed to be general agreement that it would be 
appropriate for persons from different parts of the state to 
serve on the HMB. Mr. Lynton observed in this connection that a 
large percentage of the outpatients who use the Hospital clinics 
come from outside the Worcester area. Mrs. Bluestone remarked 
that she believed that there should be a representative of health 
professionals other than physicians, and Mr. Lynton explained that 
allied health participation is a part of the By-laws. 



4854 



Health Affairs 
2/24/76 



UM/Worcester — 

Affirmative 

Action 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Differing views were expressed as to the desirability 
of Worcester-area hospital administrators serving as appointive 
members. Trustee Abrams supported such participation, while 
Trustee Croce and Professor Butcher expressed opposition to the 
idea on the grounds of possible conflict of interest. 

A discussion followed on the process for the actual 
nomination, screening and selection of names to be recommended to 
Chairman Healey. Mr. Eller said that it was his sense that the 
Committee wished to be involved with the screening process, but 
he observed that this was a time-consuming process. He therefore 
suggested that he and Ms. Veith, working with Chancellor Bulger, 
perform the staff work of matching names with the capabilities 
desired, and that the resulting list be discussed by the Committee 
at its March meeting. Mrs. Robinson said that it might not be 
necessary for the Committee to have a common discussion of the 
names, and suggested that individual Committee members might 
comment on the names or consult with the Chairman so that by the 
end of March a final list would evolve which could be recommended 
to Chairman Healey. 



Trustee McNeil asked Chancellor Bulger for information 
on the affirmative action plan on the Worcester campus for the 
hiring of faculty. Chancellor Bulger said he did not have figures! 
with him, but said he could bring them to the next meeting of the j 
Committee. Chairman Robertson explained that the University did 
have an affirmative action policy which applied to all campuses 
and which was in operation. Trustee McNeil replied that she 
understood this, but wished to know what was happening on the 
practical, as well as the theoretical, level. She asked whether 
there were blacks among the medical students, and Chancellor Bulger 
replied that considerable progress had been made in this area in 
spite of the small pool statewide and the competition from private 
medical shcools. 



Trustee Abrams remarked that this disucssion touched on 
a matter which he had planned to bring up at this meeting. He 
observed that he had read an article in the New York Times recently 
which had described the high repeat rate of black medical students] 
in their first year which was due to inadequate preparation. On 
this subject, he recalled that several years ago the Trustees had 
enacted a policy (December 5, 1973; Doc. T75-050) which called for 
a program whereby the University would seek out minority students 
in high schools and recruit them for undergraduate work at the 

niversity with the objective of eventually admitting them to the 
Medical School. He said he had asked Chancellor Bromery what pro- 
gress had been made thus far, and the Chancellor had told him he 
would look into it. In view of the fact that this was a Trustee 
Dolicy, Trustee Abrams said, it appeared that someone had been 
remiss in not carrying it out. 






I 



) 



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I 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Croce recalled that he had moved at a Faculty 
and Educational Policy Committee meeting that a pool of students 
be established beginning with the sophomore year of high school 
and that these students be coached, monitored and kept together 
as a group to prepare them for Medical School. Trustee McNeil 
said there were many minority students in high school in the 
Worcester area who simply would not think of the Medical School 
as a real alternative. 

Mr. Lynton made several comments on this subject: (1) 
with respect to normally-prepared minority students, considerable 
progress had been made at the School under Associate Dean Smith, 
(2) the kind of program just described was not yet under way, but 
that Dr. Green of Dr. Smith's staff was expected to begin discus- 
sions with the Boston campus on setting up just such a program, 
and (3) affirmative action in recruiting students should not be 
confused with affirmative action in recruiting staff. With regard 
to the last point, he said that a high priority for the Worcester 
campus continued to be a full-time affirmative action officer. 

Chancellor Bulger told Trustee McNeil that admissions 
comes under the supervision of Dr. Edgar Smith, who is bale, and 
that Dr. Milford Green was to be appointed in July as an Assistant 
Dean for Minority Affairs. He revealed that he had just signed 
a grant which would allow Dr. Green to go forward with a wide 
variety of activities along the lines discussed. It would be ex- 
pensive, however, and the School would need to take advantage of 
the federal money which he said he believed was available. Mr. 
Lynton said he would look into the policy which Trustee Abrams 
had mentioned. 

There was further discussion of details of affirmative 
action measures which the Medical Center is taking or might take. 
Following this discussion, the meeting was adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 



4855 



Health Affairs 
2/24/76 



(fladyi Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4856 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



' 



1 



ATTENDANCE: 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

March 2, 1976; 2:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 



Trustees Dennis, Gordon, Rothenburger , Troy; Secretary Hardy: 
Ms. Judd, recorder 

Other Trustees: Trustee Gavin 



Committee Members Absent: Trustees Croce, Rowland, and Shearer 



Office of the President 



Mr, 



4857 



t 



Janis , Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. Pos 
Assistant Vice President for Physical Planning; Mr. Searson, Gen- 
eral Counsel; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant; Ms. Frankel, Staff As- 
sistant 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gage 



UM/Boston : Professor Matthew Gaffney, Faculty Representative 



Guests : Mr. Pat Walker and Ms. Barbara Laurent, University of 
Massachusetts Tenants' Association; Mr. Ira Horowitz, Student 
Legal Services Office; Mr. Richard Brunell, Student Intern, Pres- 
ident's Office 

The meeting was called to order at 2:35 p.m. Chairman 
Carlson introduced the single agenda item, the Management and 
Maintenance Agreement with the Student Family Housing Cooperative 



(Doc. T76-048A) by saying that a number of suggestions had been 
made at the Committee's last meeting; these were reviewed by 
Counsel Searson and discussed with the University of Massachusetts 
Tenants' Association. A revised document was now the topic of 
discussion — one which contained the suggested language changes 
but maintained the principles put forth at the previous meeting. 
He then asked Mr. Janis to summarize the additional significant 
revisions which had been inserted. 



Mr. Janis said that Counsel Searson, after his review 
and consultation with the UMTA attorney, feels that the Agreement 
does now constitute a proper delegation. Highlighting the changed, 
Mr. Janis outlined them as follows: (1) a 30-day termination 
has been provided, in accordance with Trustee Gordon's suggestion 
where there would be a five percent variance in the rental income, 
as opposed to the previously proposed 60-day termination provi- 
sion; (2) the UMTA has agreed to make recommendations with 



UM/Amherst — 
Management / 
Maintenance 
Agreement 
(Doc. T76-048A) 



4858 



Budget & Finance: 
3/2/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



regard to union labor, and the University will make a good faith 
effort to comply with those recommendations in accordance with 
the existing collective bargaining agreement; (3) because of 
some inconsistencies and the need for further review, the rules 
and regulations have been separated out from the Agreement and 
will be the subject of further negotiation between the UMTA and 
the Amherst campus; (4) the contract provides that the University 
will have the right to make whatever inspections are necessary 
and that major deficiencies which remain uncorrected would be 
grounds for termination; (5) leases will now be between the Uni- 
versity and the tenants, with the UMTA as managing agent, rather 
than between the UMTA and the tenants; (6) the fee for management 
will be payable monthly in advance to provide the UMTA with 
additional cash flow to function properly; (7) with regard to 
office space, the campus has agreed that suitable space will be 
provided, other than in the Whitmore Building as originally pro- 
posed; (8) a certified annual audit will be made; (9) failure 
to reach mutual agreements in any particular as provided in the 
Management Agreement will be grounds for termination; (10) the 
"hold harmless" clause, Article 30, has been revised in accor- 
dance with previous suggestions; (11) the resident agent for the 
University will be Chancellor Bromery who shall have all powers 
to make decisions proper to the resident agent; and (12) the 
$40,000 loan from the Resident Hall Trust Fund will be kept in 
a separate account. Four safeguards have thus been provided; 
(1) the protection of revenues, (2) bonds and insurance, (3) 
fiscal reviews, and (4) grounds for termination. 

Chairman Carlson said that , in view of the fact that 
the rules and regulations will be a separate part of the docu- 
ment, it should be specified that the tenants are to express 
their concurrence not only with the Agreement itself, but also 
with those rules and regulations after their final formulation. 
Mr. Walker agreed with this idea. 

In answer to Trustee Gavin's question, President Wood 
pointed out that while the rules and regulations were still sub- 
ject to revision, the proposed Committee action would not be to 
approve them, but to insure that after their completion, they 
would be reviewed by the tenants involved. 

Trustee Dennis expressed his reservation about the five 
percent rental variance, saying that he thought it too strict 
especially for the first few months of operation. Mr. Janis 
said that a cushion has been provided in an allowance for vacancy 
factors and bad debt. Chairman Carlson pointed out that this 
allowance was three percent; added to the five percent already 
stipulated, as much as an eight percent variance was allowable. 

Dr. Gage said that difficulties could be anticipated 
in the months of July and August when there is likely to be a 
higher vacancy rate than normal; however, he expressed assurances 



• 



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' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the University would act in good faith during that period. 
It was pointed out that under the terms of the Agreement, termi- 
nation on the grounds of a five percent variance is possible but 
not mandatory. Dr. Gage said that seasonal fluctuations would 
be taken into account before contract cancellation would be 
contemplated. Trustee Troy said that since the Agreement would 
begin during the summer, it should be treated with some flexi- 
bility during these opening months. 

In response to Trustee Gavin's concern that there be 
some problems with approval of the rules and regulations thereby 
necessitating further negotiation with the Trustees, Chairman 
Carlson said that differences which may arise during discussions 
by the campus and UMTA would not negate any vote taken by the 
Board of Trustees. Counsel Searson added that the only approval 
necessary would be that of Chancellor Bromery. 

With regard to office space, Mr. Walker expressed his 
wish for an accessible location. Chairman Carlson supported 
this position. Mr. Janis added that according to statute, 
remuneration must be made for use of the space — a subject which 
would have to be taken up with Chancellor Bromery. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Chancellor of the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst to execute a Manage- 
ment and Maintenance Agreement (as set forth 
in Doc. T76-048A) with the Student Family Housing 
Cooperative, for the management and operation of 
student family housing facilities at the Amherst 
campus; provided , that said Agreement shall not 
be executed until (1) it has been approved by 
the University of Massachusetts Building Author- 
ity; (2) a majority of the present tenants of 
such student family housing facilities have 
expressed their concurrence to this Agreement 
and the related rules and regulations for ten- 
ants; and (3) the Chancellor has determined 
that all monies now in the possession of either 
the University of Massachusetts Tenants' Asso- 
ciation or the Student Family Housing Cooper- 
ative, which monies constitute rentals due to 
the University but which have been withheld, 
have been remitted to the University. 

At Chairman Carlson's suggestion, the Committee then 
briefly discussed critical needs. Mr. Janis said that two as- 
pects for consideration were (1) critical needs for this year's 



4859 



Budget & Finance 
3-2-76 



Status of 
Critical Needs 



4860 



Budget & Finance 
3-2-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

second semester and (2) critical needs for next fall. With 
regard to the second semester needs, he said that those positions 
which have been approved are in the process of being filled; how- 
ever, for the classified staff, in many cases union contracts pro 
vide for filling from below. A cascading effect is created when 
a promotion to a higher grade position occurs in that a critical 
need will then have to be submitted for the vacant lower grade 
position. This could lead to the situation of the University's 
having to apply for critical needs on a weekly basis. In order 
to manage this cumbersome problem, Mr. Janis suggested that the 
Committee, in its monthly meetings, give its concurrence post 
facto to the President's critical needs requests should these 
weekly actions become necessary. President Wood added that the 
Committee will be informed at all times as to what is being sub- 
mitted. The Committee unanimously agreed to this method of 
operation. 

Mr. Janis continued by saying that the University is 
beginning to make commitments for faculty hiring for the fall 
semester. If the critical needs process is still in effect, 
the Commissioner of Administration and Finance may agree to 
receive critical needs submissions on the basis of fall projec- 
tions, along with a fiscal plan based on meeting the budget 
figures in House I. It may then be possible to get contingent 
approval of those critical needs, provided that the budget is 
the House I figure or better. 

There being no further discussion, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 3:15 p.m. 



C/Gladys Keith Hardy " 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



' 



4861 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

March 3, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Room 308, Administration Building 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

PRESENT: Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey, President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, 
Spiller, and Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. 
Mehegan, recorder 

Other Trustees : Trustees Breyer, Burack, Dennis, Gavin, McNeil, 
Morgenthau, Rothenburger and Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. lynton, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; Mr. Eller, Associate 
Vice President for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Direc- 
tor; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization and 
Management; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for Physical 
Planning; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Ms. Frankel, Staff Assis- 
tant for Management and Business Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director 



UM/ Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Hittelman, Faculty 
Representat ive 

Guests: Susan Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; 



Michael Pill, UM/ Amherst Legal Services Office; Patrick Walker, 
University of Massachusetts Tenants Association 

The meeting was called to order at 11:10. Chairman 
Healey asked Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance, to explain the first agenda item, a proposed Fund 
Transfer. Mr. Carlson observed that, in the opening of any new 
Hospital, it was difficult to foresee the amounts of basic 
medical supplies needed. Since the University Hospital had 
opened in January, the rate of depletion of such supplies as 
gauze, intravenous solutions, etc., had exceeded expectations. 
For this reason, the Medical School was requesting a transfer 
of funds from the 02 and 08 accounts into the 07 account. Mr. 
Carlson also informed the Committee that the Chancellor was 
presently undertaking a complete review of the account distribu- 
tion and would have a report to the Budget and Finance Committee 
in time for the May meeting of the Board. 

Ms. Tehan asked that the equipment being requested be 
specified, since it was not mentioned in the motion, and asked 



UM/Worcester— 
Fund Transfer 



48G2 



Exec. Comm. 
3-3-76 



Revision of 
Trustee By-laws 
(Docs. T73-031, 
T76-051) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

whether the equipment requested had been filed with the Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs. It was pointed out that no equip- 
ment was involved, only consumable supplies and that there was 
no need to file a list with the Executive Office. Upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve and authorize the transfer of 
$250,000 requested by the Worcester campus 
to meet additional needs for the purchase 
of medical and surgical supplies essential 
for the care of patients at University Hos- 
pital. The funds to be transferred into sub- 
sidiary account 07 shall be from subsidiary 
account 02 in the amount of $150,000 and 
from subsidiary 08 in the amount of $100,000. 

Chairman Healey turned to the revised By-laws of the 
Board of Trustees (Doc. T76-051) , recalling that the Trustees 
had incorporated into the existing By-laws (Doc. T73-031) at 
the February meeting certain changes in the Trustee Committee 
structure. Additional adjustments in the By-laws were proposed 
for action at the March meeting and a copy of the revised docu- 
ment was provided to all Trustees in February in order to give 
them ample time to study it and formulate comments or suggestions^ 
He opened the floor for discussion. 

Trustee Burack thanked the Chairman for the opportunity! 
to speak, since she was not a member of the Committee. She said 
she had read the draft By-laws several times carefully and had 
reservations about the procedure, in Article III, Section 5, for 
placing matters on the Committees' agendas by individuals or 
groups other than the recognized governance bodies. She suggested 
that Subsection (d) in particular was an extremely elaborate 
procedure, and might prove very frustrating to a petitioner. 
She described the procedure as a demoralizing and inefficient 
obstacle course, and said she would not find the procedure 
acceptable without modification. 



Chancellor Bromery described two benefits of the Liai- 
son Committee system set forth in Section (d) : (1) it provides 
an orderly process for issues emanating from the campus to go 
through appropriate channels, including the Chancellor and the 
President, to the Trustees, and (2) it permits many issues 
which might otherwise go to the Board to be resolved on the 
campus. 

Trustee Burack replied that she was concerned about 
the possibility of items being resolved without the Trustees 
even knowing they are issues. As it stands, she said, there is 
presently no access to the Board for petitioners. There might 
be many issues which the Trustees ought to see, but would not 
get the opportunity. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Spiller disagreed, saying that it would not be 
proper for the Trustees to deal directly with all the minute 
details of managing the campuses. They must deal with setting 
policy. Making it easier for individuals or groups to bring 
matters to the Trustees directly would undermine the rightful 
autonomy of the campus governance process. 

Trustee Gordon noted that, if the issue was informa- 
tion, he felt well aware of what was going on on the campuses. 
He said he received minutes of meetings of the recognized gov- 
ernance bodies, and added that the unrecognized groups were not 
bashful about calling and mailing to Trustees. 

Chancellor Golino said that if the campus administra- 
tion had no mechanism by which to resolve the managerial type 
of issues which individuals or groups desire to bring before 
the Trustees, an incredible number of problems would be coming 
directly to the Board. He said he could share the concern that 
an important item might not reach the Trustees, but he thought 
that unlikely. He added that this mechanism afforded the adminis 
tration the opportunity to reduce to matters of policy the items 
that come to the Board. 

Trustee Gavin agreed with Trustee Burack. She said 
students were just now beginning to feel comfortable about 
bringing matters to the Trustees, and added that they would soon 
be bringing many matters to the Committees. The students already 
feel there are walls between them and the Trustees, and she said 
that placing a Liaison Committee between students and Trustees 
would simply antagonize them further. She cited the long effort 
on the part of the University of Massachusetts Tenants Associa- 
tion to bring its proposal before the Board (Doc. T76-048A; see 
also Trustee minutes of March 3, 1976) as an example of the 
difficulties of gaining access to the Board. She said she 
believed the paths between students and the Trustees should be 
kept clear. 

Trustee Carlson reminded Trustee Gavin that the Liai- 
son Committee procedure was already in effect, had been for 
several years, and therefore was not a new proposal. The pro- 
posal was to shift its focus from the Board agenda to the Com- 
mittees' agendas. 

President Wood offered some of the history of the Liai- 
son Committee procedure. The procedure had been established as 
a result of a period after the Kent State-Cambodia crisis in 
1970 when many groups were clamoring for Trustee access on such 
issues as war contracts and ROTC . The Trustees at that time 
were inundated by representations from campus groups of various 
kinds and numbers, many of which were put before the Board with- 
out even the prior knowledge of the Chancellors. The Liaison 
Committee procedure in no way suppresses the normal governance 



4863 



Exec. Comm, 
3-3-76 



4864 



Exec. Comm. 
3-3-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

process, he said, although he was aware of the time problem in 
using it. It does provide a mechanism for separating the issues 
which should and should not come to the Board, and serves to 
maintain the proper sequence of consideration. It was an orga- 
nizing and scheduling device, not a censor. 

Chairman Healey made the point that the Chairman of 
the Board has a great deal of discretion in these matters. He 
had accelerated the process in the case of the UMTA problem, he 
observed, when it became clear that allegations of slowdowns on 
the campus and even in the Trustee Committees were being made, 
and he had allowed the representative of the UMTA to address the 
Board at the February meeting. He said that he had, if anything, 
| been too liberal in allowing matters to be sent directly to the 
Board, and emphasized that the purpose of the change in liaison 
procedure was to keep the focus on the Committee system while 
allowing an escape valve for unusual cases. 

Chancellor Bromery pointed out to Trustee Gavin that 
it was through the Liaison Committee process that the UMTA pro- 
posal had come to the Board. The Committee had met and recom- 
mended Trustee consideration, thus working in favor of, rather 
than against, the students' interests. In response to Trustee 
Gavin's expressed intention to bring more issues to the Board 
and its Committees, he pointed out that the Student Government 
Association had not brought a single proposal to the Chancellor 
since she and Mr. Ragin had been co-Presidents. Trustee Gavin 
replied that proposals would be forthcoming. 

Trustee Breyer said he could see that if an issue were 
turned down by the Liaison Committee, the Trustees might not 
know about it, but said he thought this was probably unlikely. 
He agreed with Trustee Burack that there were three levels , but 
said this would probably not be a problem, since the Chancellor 
served on the Committee along with representatives of both stu- 
dents and faculty. Chairman Healey remarked that all represen- 
tatives on the Committee had an obligation to communicate to 
their constituencies. Trustee Morgenthau observed that she was 
being contacted by Chancellors, students, department chairmen 
and others with increasing frequency, and she said she knows 
much of what is going on by reading the campus newspapers. As 
an example, she said, Chancellor Golino's proposal to merge 
Colleges I and II on the Boston campus would soon come before 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, and she intended 
to ask Secretary Hardy to ensure that the documentation on this 
matter be full and even-handed. As a new Trustee, she was just 
learning how to use the system, she said, but she shared 
Trustee Burack' s concern. 

Trustee Troy agreed that the Chairman had been extreme- 
ly liberal in allowing unscheduled representations to the Board 
— perhaps too liberal — and added that there had been and would 



4865 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

still be the opportunity for special cases to come to the Trust- 
ees' attention. But he was concerned at the idea of inviting 
the kind of representations which had come before the Board in 
the Kent State-Cambodia period. The effect of such an increase, 
on top of the already heavy workload, would be enough to swamp 
the Trustees. 

Trustee McNeil expressed the view that Chancellors must 
fulfill their responsibilities before the Trustees inject them- 
selves into campus issues. She asked whether the Chancellors 
believed the Liaison Committee system to be an efficient and 
effective device for the redress of grievances. Chancellor 
Bromery replied affirmatively. He also observed that the pro- 
cedure was used only for very anomalous cases and had, in fact, 
been used only once since it had been established. Chancellor 
Golino replied that he too was concerned about the position of 
the Chancellors; there must be an understanding on the part of 
the Trustees that decisions of an operational or managerial 
character will remain at the Chancellor's level. He was concernec 
about the effect of the Trustees' looking into every unpopular 
decision a Chancellor makes. 

Secretary Hardy pointed out that the Liaison Committee 
procedure begins when an individual on a campus makes a request 
in writing to the Secretary of the Board that some matter be 
placed on a Trustee Committee agenda. The Secretary then refers 
the matter to the Chancellor, who must convene the Liaison Com- 
mittee. Therefore, she said, there was no chance of the Board 
of Trustees not knowing about an issue before the Liaison Com- 
mittee. 

Trustee Robertson said, first, that he felt adequately 
informed about issues, second, that there was an adequate system 
of referral, and third, that if a Chancellor is making the wrong 
decisions the Trustees should get a new Chancellor, instead of 
allowing groups or individuals to make an "end run" around him. 
He also made the point that, while abolishing the Liaison Com- 
mittee procedure would permit more easy access to the Trustees, 
it would actually have the effect of centralizing the University 
further in that the top level of governance (the Trustees) would 
be asked to make all manner of decisions. The Liaison Committee 
procedure is, in fact, a safeguard for campus autonomy. Trustee 
Gordon strongly agreed with this analysis and cautioned against 
Trustee interference in matters which have received little or 
no campus-level consideration. 

Chairman Healey repeated the minor nature of the change 
under consideration, and reminded the Trustees that if the new 
system does not work, a majority of Trustees can always change 
it. But he asked that it be given a chance to work. 



Exec. Comm. 
3-3-76 



4866 



Exec. Comm. 
3-3-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

rescind the present Trustee By-laws (Doc. 
T73-031) and adopt the revised Trustee By- 
laws (Doc. T76-051). 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 11:55 a.m. 



' 



uSladys fteith Hardy " 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



' 



' 



i 



ATTENDANCE: 



^W 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

March 23, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Shaler; Trustee Gavin; 



Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Ms. Kaplan representing 
Trustee Okin; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Eddy, Gordon, McNeil and 
Morgenthau 

Other Trustees: Trustee Rothenburger 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant 
Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. O'Leary, 
Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant for Student Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. 



Averill, Director of University Health Services; Mr. Fitzpatrick, 
Director of the Office of Residential Life 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for 



Student Affairs 



Guests : Susan Tehan, Office of Educational Affairs; Richard 



Brunell, Student Intern on the President's Office; Students and 
Student Government Staff: Patrick Walker, Michael Pill, Henry 
Ragin, Michael Gness, Barbara Estabrook, John Hite, Lauren 
Perry, Jay A. Martus , Paul M. Cronin, Bob Role, Karen Kelly, 
Milton Kirstein 

The meeting was convened at 2:00 p.m. Chairman Shaler 
turned first to Health Services at UM/Amherst, the first compo- 
nent of which was a proposal to authorize a contract to establish 
a Health Maintenance Organization at Amherst (Doc. T76-052) . He 
recognized Dr. Gage. 

Dr. Gage asked Mr. Barry Averill to explain the details 
of the proposal, but first stated that a great deal of planning 
had gone into this proposal and that the campus administration 
recommended it strongly. Mr. Averill explained that the Trustees 
were being asked to discuss a two-part proposal: to authorize 
a contract for an HMO, and to authorize an optional fee which 
would allow the University Health Services to cover the depend- 
ents of students. 

The HMO was a prepaid, comprehensive health service 
for University faculty, staff and their dependents, plus others 



4867 



UM/Amherst — 
Health Services 
(Doc. T76-052) 



4868 



Stu. Affairs 
3/23/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the Amherst area. All members of the plan would pay a flat 
premium and would receive health care at the University Health 
Services in the case of faculty, staff and their dependents, or 
at Amherst Medical Associates, a private group practice, in the 
case of non-University persons. 

The establishment of such a plan would make possible 
a further benefit: the specialized physicians who would be 
brought to the campus to work at the University Health Services 
could then provide service to dependents of students, at an 
optional fee. Presently, the dependents of students are not 
covered by the Student Health Fee because of the great cost of 
hiring the specialized physicians needed, particularly pediatri- 
cians and gynecologists. 

In response to a question, Mr. Averill said that this 
was the first venture of its kind — a joint public-private, uni- 
versity-based health plan — in the country. The U.S. Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare had agreed to finance the plan- 
ning and prospective implementation of the plan with almost $500,000 
and many colleges and universities around the country were watch- 
ing the experiment with great interest. 

Trustee Gavin cited the motion passed by the Under- 
graduate Student Senate, which had endorsed the concept of the 
HMO, but which had withheld its complete support unless certain 
commitments were written into the plan. Among the commitments 
desired by the Senate were: 



1. That the Valley Health Plan Inc. (the organization 
to be contracted with) not waive open enrollment 
after the first year unless demonstrated harm 

to the organization would result . 

2. That contracts be signed with Medicare and Medicaid 
after the first year. 

3. That a proposal be developed within one year 
which would set as its target financial assistance 
to those members of the Community who cannot afford 
the HMO premiums. 

Considerable discussion followed on the possibility 
and necessity of such commitments. Mr. Averill said that Counsel 
O'Leary had advised him that state law would not permit non- 
University persons to use the University Health facilities, al- 
though this might change at a later date. Amherst Medical Asso- 
ciates, the private provider in the plan, does provide service 
to Medicare and Medicaid patients and does provide care to indi- 
gent persons in the area without full recompense. 



I 



P 



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1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Michael Geness, a student member of the Student Health 
Advisory Board, explained that Valley Health Plan Inc. had made 
a commitment to try to extend services to Medicare and Medicaid 
patients, but that there were forces at the state and federal 
level which VHP could not control. For example, Medicare will 
not sign a contract with VHP until the Plan has been operational 
at least a year. But the VHP had expressed the intention to 
make a good-faith attempt. 

Discussion followed on the value of a good-faith inten- 
tion. A student doubted its adequacy. Ms. Kaplan said the 
phrase was not to be taken lightly, and that VHP was not a fly- 
by-night organization. She also suggested that perhaps the VHP 
could be asked to put this good-faith intention in writing. She 
said that the Department of Mental Health had been working with 
the health planners of Region I and they viewed the HMO proposal 
with interest and favor as a forward-looking model. 

Chairman Shaler reminded all present that this would 
be only a one-year authorization and that, before extending the 
authorization, the Trustees would wish to ensure that all impor- 
tant questions were answered. He trusted that the plan would be 
closely monitored in its first year. Dr. Lynton suggested that 
discussion take place with VHP with the object of committing its 
intentions to paper. He also added the strong endorsement of 
the plan by the Office of the President. 

Explaining that the Budget and Finance Committee would 
consider recommending the plan at its later meeting, and that 
the subject was on this Committee's agenda for purposes of dis- 
cussion, Chairman Shaler turned the discussion to New Fees and 
Fee Increases at UM/Boston (Doc. T76-054) and UM/ Amherst. He 
reminded the Committee that this item of the agenda would also 
be before the Committee on Budget and Finance for its recom- 
mended action, and that the subject was before this Committee 
for discussion and to provide the Student Affairs Committee mem- 
bers the opportunity to address substantive issues relative to 
proposed fees. He recognized Chancellor Golino. 

Chancellor Golino explained that there were two actions 
requested by the Boston campus: to establish a trust fund for 
the support of a fee-assisted summer session, and to extend the 
Health Services fee on the campus to part-time students . 

It was explained that, although the University regards 
the provision of a summer session as extremely important, the 
Legislature will not appropriate funds to support it. The campus 
had supported the summer session in previous years by relying on 
the operating budget, but that was no longer possible in today's 
austere circumstances. Therefore a fee is the only way. It was 
pointed out that the fee proposed was competitive with fees 
levied by private colleges and universities. 



4869 



Stu. Affairs 
3-23-76 



UM/Boston — 
New Fees and 
Fee Increases 
(Doc. T76-054) 



4870 



Stu. Affairs 
3-23-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rothenburger agreed that there probably was no 
other way to finance a summer session, but he said he was con- 
cerned that this would set a bad precedent which would be diffi- 
cult to reverse. This fee could limit access to many who could 
not afford $75 for a three-credit course. Or it could drive 
potential students away from the summer programs. Chancellor 
Golino said that UM/Boston had been unique in making the summer 
session free in the past, but that it can no longer afford to 
support it from the operating budget. He said about 500 students 
at UM/Boston have indicated interest in a summer session, even 
if a fee is charged. 

Mr. Callahan pointed out that, in supporting the summer 
session from its regular operating budget, the University had 
been one step ahead of the state colleges, all of which levy a 
fee for their summer sessions. This action, if adopted, would 
simply move the University to a position consistent with public 
higher education generally. 

Speaking then to the proposed change in the Health 
Services fee, Mr. Tubbs explained that part-time students would 
be assessed a fee equal to 50 percent of the health fee paid by 
full-time undergraduates, and part-time and full-time graduate 
students would pay a fee in the same manner and amount as under- 
graduates. This was a more equitable arrangement supported by 
the students. There was no discussion of this point. 

The meeting next turned to a discussion of proposed 
Fee Changes and New Fees at UM/Amherst. Mr. Lynton spoke first, 
saying that this matter was being brought to the Committee for 
discussion, and that the campus was not yet ready to make a 
definite recommendation. All of the options presented were 
"possibles," therefore, and should be discussed in that context. 

Mr. Lynton briefly reviewed possible fees and fee in- 
creases, and said that those of greatest interest were the $70 
room rent increase — the only mandatory fee increase contemplated j 
— and the single room premium. Chairman Shaler asked Dr. Gage 
to review the options. 

Dr. Gage first introduced the new co-Presidents-elect 
of the Student Government Association, Jay Martus and Paul 
Cronin. Mr. Cronin was to be the new student Trustee. 

After reviewing the proposed changes in the optional 
fees, Dr. Gage pointed out that opposition to the single room 
premium had been such that the idea was being restudied and was 
not put forth for Trustee discussion at this time. 

He then distributed a document which set forth the 
serious problem which had developed with the management of the 
residence halls. He reminded the Trustees that the residence 
halls could not be supported by state funds, and that their 



I 



I 



I 



4871 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

upkeep and operation had to be self-supporting. At the present 
schedule of renovation, a complete renovation of the forty-one 
buildings would not be accomplished in less than fifty years. 
He noted that the rationale in formulating the residence hall 
budgets had for several years been laid on keeping rents as 
low as possible, and as a result the condition of some of the 
buildings was growing steadily worse. 

Dr. Gage said that the residence halls were in need 
of $25 million in capital improvements in the next five years, 
but he said he knew this was impossible. A reasonable compromise 
would be capital improvements to the extent of two renovations 
per year, which would permit a complete cycle in twenty years, 
with five refurbishments . This would amount to about $2.5 millioh 
per year. He listed other past or near-future expenses, including; 
repairs to North Village roofs and furniture replacements. 

He then listed four alternative solutions, two of 
which were impractical: a further reduction in costs, with its 
accompanying deterioration in service, and default on the debt, 
which would only bring about borrowing from the operating budget. 
The two other alternatives were: (1) a one-year $70 increase in 
room rent, which would raise enough money to finance another 
renovation, and (2) a general, inclusive fee of $125, which was 
disagreeable to some but should at least be considered as an 
alternative. Discussions of these options were to continue with 
students living in the residence halls, and a recommendation 
would be made to the Trustees later. He cited tables and graphs 
in the documentation, and pointed out that any figures might be 
altered by Legislatively-mandated cost-of-living increases, 
should they be enacted. 

Mr. Ragin, co-President of the Student Government 
Association, was recognized, and he commented on the campus dis- 
cussion process. He said the discussions on the fees had been 
carried out without the knowledge of either him or Trustee Gavin. 
One of the students who was involved in the discussions had re- 
ported to him that the administration had said that Trustee Gavin 
and Mr. Ragin could not be included in the talks. 

Chairman Shaler asked if he was correct in his under- 
standing that there was an official Student Senate Committee 
which dealt with rents and fees, and Mr. Ragin said that the 
Committee was "in transit." Mr. Martus said that he had been 
co-chairperson of this Committee, which had recently been re- 
organized by the Student Senate. Since he had served on the 
Rents and Fees Committee, he had continued to participate in 
discussions with the administration after the Committee had been 
dissolved. He described the fate of the Rents and Fees Com- 
mittee as a partisan political issue in the Student Government 
Association which did not have a place at this meeting. He 
agreed, however, that all parties affected by this issue should 
have been involved in the discussions. 



Stu. Affairs 
3/23/76 



4872 



Stu. Affairs 
3/23/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Speaking to the single room premium, Mr. Cronin said 
that raising the rents and adding a $100 premium would have the 
effect of driving students off the campus, thereby further 
glutting the housing market in the Amherst area. He said that 
students would not pay that much extra money to live in a single 
room. 

Trustee Gavin said she was offended by Dr. Gage's con- 
viction that the only way to finance the residence halls was from 
students' pockets. She asked for an explanation of the fund 
allocations and asked whether there were reserve accounts for 
ref urbishments and renovations. Dr. Gage replied that there were 
none. 

Secretary Hardy and Dr. Gage both recalled that Secre- 
tary Parks had indicated during a meeting in the spring of 1975 
that there might be capital outlay funds available for use in 
the residence hall system. Miss Tehan was asked if any investiga 
tion had been done, and she replied that she would ask Secretary 
Parks and report to the Budget and Finance Committee tomorrow. 

Mr. Martus asked to make a presentation about the fee 
proposals. He said first that students were in support of most 
of the optional fees. He had serious reservations about three 
points, however: (1) the proposed single room premium, (2) the 
proposed $70 rent increase, and (3) the proposed general fee. 

As for the single room fee, he said he understood that 
its purpose was to equalize the fee for single rooms across the 
campus. This was an idea which had occurred to both students 
and administration, he said, but there had not been sufficient 
time for discussion across the campus. Decisions of this kind 
should be made on a long-term basis, he said, and there should 
be adequate data and discussion in order to have a reasoned 
policy. It was pointed out by Dr. Gage and others that this fee 
had been withdrawn as of the moment and was not on the table. 

Trustee Gavin pointed out that singles are assigned 
presently by seniority or need, and that this is a superior 
system to that of assigning a fee, which makes singles available 
to the more affluent. 

Speaking to the $70 rent increase idea, Mr. Martus said 
that this would place an immense burden on students at a time 
when financial aid appears not to be in prospect in the amounts 
that had been expected. He observed that the increase was to 
have a one-year duration, which he said showed a stop-gap 
measure. He remarked that the $70 increase was tied to the 
general fee, which many students and administrators were con- 
cerned and in doubt about. He said that at least a year of 
discussion was needed to bring about a permanent, long-range 
solution, and that enacting the $70 increase would simply post- 
pone the issue for another year. He called for intensive 
discussions and an intensive study of the alternatives. 



4873 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gavin said there should be discussion of the 
human dynamics which bring about the conditions in the residence 
halls. This was a critical issue, and she added that she be- 
lieved the best way to manage dormitories would be the establish- 
ment of student-run cooperatives. Such a proposal had been made 
to the Office of Residential Life and had been rejected. A 
rent increase, she said, would simply make students angry. 

Secretary Hardy suggested, in view of the extensive 
discussion which had taken place at this meeting, that it might 
not be wise to have the Budget and Finance Committee go through 
it all again the very next day, since it would not be receiving 
specific fee recommendations for action until its next meeting 
in April. Trustee Shaler said he agreed there appeared not to 
be enough information, but he doubted the propriety of influ- 
encing the agenda of another Committee. Secretary Hardy said 
this Committee might suggest the alteration in the agenda to 
the Chairman of another Committee, but that it was of course 
the decision of the Chairman of that Committee. 

Mr. Lynton pointed out that to repeat this discussion 
of possible courses of action, none of which have the status of 
recommendations, would be redundant. After a month of intensive 
campus discussion, a recommendation might emerge which would 
then be a more appropriate platform for further discussion by 
Trustees. 



Stu. Affairs 
3-23-76 



Chairman Shaler asked Dr. Gage what he foresaw in the 
month ahead. Dr. Gage said he was distinctly of two minds: on 
the one hand, he realized that there had been insufficient dis- 
cussion at the campus, but on the other hand there never seemed 
to be sufficient data or discussion. He said he doubted that 
it was possible to have enough discussion to suit all concerned. 
He suggested that if nothing is done in the year ahead, the 
campus will be three-quarters of a million dollars worse off 
than it is at present. He suggested that the best thing might 
be to go ahead with the $70 increase for one year and to con- 
tinue discussions toward a permanent solution. He doubted that 
a month's discussion would add anything to what is already known, 
and added that someone, sometime would have to make a decision to 
run the residence halls in keeping with the mandate of the 
Building Authority and the Trustees. 

Mr. Lynton said that the single room premium was an 
internal, secondary issue. The key question was whether to 
change the room rental structure or to postpone renovations, 
and he said he saw no way to postpone at least advising the 
Budget and Finance Committee of these alternatives beyond the 
April meeting. In no case could the issue be postponed for 
another year. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick said that Mr. Martus was aware that 
sincere and earnest efforts had been made, in discussions 



4874 



Stu. Affairs 
3-23-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

beginning in November with the student Rents and Fees Committee, 
to resolve this problem. He said he had come to the conclusion 
that it was unresolvable . The residence halls had been "run 
like the Penn Central" for seven years. The Trustees had ap- 
proved a deficit budget year after year. The Office of Residen- 
tial Life had submitted a no-rent-increase budget to the campus 
Budget Office which would bring the reserves down to $25,000 
next year, and he said administration and students were agreed 
that the residence halls were in increasingly deplorable condi- 
tion. The campus needs $2-3 million per year for the residence 
halls, he said, and he doubted that the students could pay for it. 

Chairman Shaler asked that the discussion be brought 
to a close because no more could be accomplished at this time. 
He reiterated that discussions should continue on the campus 
in the next month. 

Trustee Gavin said the students would not pay a rent 
increase. Therefore, there seemed little point in going back 
to the campus and discussing further when there seemed to be 
a foregone conclusion that this money would have to come from 
the students. She asked who would be the appropriate person or 
office with which to discuss a completely new approach to fin- 
ancing the residence halls. She said further discussions with 
Dr. Gage would only consist of the students saying they could 
not pay and Dr. Gage saying that they must. Dr. Gage said he 
was ready and willing to discuss any ideas which the students 
might have. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee and the meeting was adjourned at 4:35 p.m. 



r 



^ladys&eith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 




I 



I 



PRESENT 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

March 24, 1976; 1:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson, Trustees Dennis 
Gordon, Rothenburger , Rowland, Shearer, Troy; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Judd, recorder 

Other Trustees: Trustee Gavin 

Committee Members Absent: Trustee Croce 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academi 
Affairs; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Direc- 
tor; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization and 
Management; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice 
President for Physical Planning 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Mr. Aver ill, Director, University Health 
Services; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Gaffney, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Professor Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Pro- 
fessor Susan Smith, Faculty Representative-designate 

Guests: Mr. Rice, Executive Director, Valley Health Plan; Ms. 
Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. Cronin, Stu- 
dent Trustee-elect, UM/Amherst; Mr. Martus , Co-President-elect, 
Student Government Association; Mr. Gness, Ms. Estabrook, Mr. 
Katz, Student Health Advisory Board, UM/Amherst; Mr. Pill, Stu- 
dent Legal Services Office, UM/Amherst; Mr. Walker, University 
of Massachusetts Tenants Association; Mr. Fisher, Project Coor- 
dinator, Student Organizing Project; Mr. Role, Student Government 
Association; Mr. Ragin, Co-President, Student Government Associa- 
tion; Mr. Brunell, student intern, President's Office 

The meeting was called to order at 1:40 p.m. Chairman 
Carlson began by welcoming Professor Matthew Gaffney, faculty 
representative from UM/Boston, and Professor Susan Smith, faculty 
representative-designate from UM/Worcester . Chancellor Bromery 
then introduced the newly-elected Co-Presidents of the Student 
Government Association, Mr. Jay Martus and Mr. Paul Cronin. 

Turning to the first agenda item, the Management and 
Maintenance Agreement with the Student Family Housing Cooperative 



4675 



4876 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 

UM/Amherst- 
Management 



and 



Maintenance 
Agreement 
(Doc. T76-048A) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(Doc. T76-048A) , Chairman Carlson asked Mr. Janis to review 
events which had transpired since the Board of Trustees' vote 
of March 3, 1976 and the proposed modification of that vote. The 
Board's approval had been contingent upon (1) return of rent 
monies which had been withheld, (2) the approval by the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority, and (3) the ratification of 
the Agreement by a majority of the tenants. At its meeting on 
March 10, the Building Authority indicated that it had not had 
enough time to study the Agreement adequately, and had decided 
to postpone its considerations until March 31. It is expected 
that their opinion will be that it is inappropriate to vote 
either its approval or disapproval. Therefore, in order to be 
consistent with the Building Authority's projected position, the 
March 3 vote is being amended by including section 2 (a) , "the 
University of Massachusetts Building Authority shall have been 
informed of the proposed Agreement and, upon review, shall not 
have stated any objection thereto or disapproval thereof." Chair-' 
man Carlson said that under these circumstances, the amendment 
to the vote seemed to be a practical solution to the problem. 
He noted that the responsibility for these facilities is placed 
directly with the Trustees. Trustee Troy added that he thought 
that the action would be thoroughly acceptable to the Building 
Authority. A motion was made, seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees (1) that 
the vote of March 3, 1976 pertaining to the 
proposed Management and Maintenance Agreement 
with the Student Family Housing Cooperative be 
rescinded, and (2) that the Board authorize the 
Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst to execute a Management and Maintenance 
Agreement (as set forth in Doc. T76-048A) with 
the Student Family Housing Cooperative, for the 
management and operation of student family housing 
facilities at the Amherst campus; provided , that 
said Agreement shall not be executed except upon 
the following conditions: (a) the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority shall have been 
informed of the proposed Agreement and, upon 
review, shall not have stated any objection 
thereto or disapproval thereof; (b) a majority 
of the present tenants of such student family 
housing facilities shall have expressed their 
concurrence to this Agreement and the related 
rules and regulations for tenants; and (c) the 
Chancellor shall have determined that all monies 
now in the possession of either the University 
of Massachusetts Tenants' Association or the 
Student Family Housing Cooperative, which monies 
constitute rental due to the University but which 
have been withheld, have been remitted to the 
University. 



f 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the Committee's last meeting, a report on personnel 
matters and the critical needs situation was requested. Mr. 
Kaplan therefore reviewed the process in which the University 
has been engaged and outlined four areas of concern: (1) the 
status of critical needs positions which have been released, 
(2) the controls set up by the University to ensure ability to 
pay for those positoins, (3) the current status of vacancies, and 
(4) the process intended to be used for any additional positions 
this year and faculty requirements for next fall. With respect 
to item (1), Mr. Kaplan said that the Executive Office of Adminis 
tration and Finance had released 110 positions to the University; 
at present, roughly 2/3 of those positions have been filled or 
are in the process of being filled. His second point was that 
the campuses are in the process of developing a set of reports on 
the payroll expenditures of the University and will be advising 
the Committee and the President's Office as to any transfers 
which may be necessary to meet payroll requirements within this 
year's appropriation; these will be presented to the Board of 
Trustees at its May meeting. On the current status of vacancies, 
Mr. Kaplan said that there is presently an 18 percent University- 
wide vacancy rate, a significantly high figure especially when 
compared to the 8.3 percent rate in December, 1974 (the date the 
University instituted its Austerity Program) . As to positions 
required for the remainder of this fiscal year, timetables have 
been set and material is expected from the campuses which would 
provide for critical needs justifiable both in terms of program 
and the University's ability to pay within current appropriations 
With respect to faculty requirements for next fall, indications 
are that the Executive branch may not give firm commitments for 
the fall, since they involve budgets which presently do not 
exist. Preliminary figures indicate that the Amherst campus ex- 
pects a 17-18 percent faculty vacancy rate in September, 1976; 
it is hoped that sufficient commitments can be gotten to reduce 
that rate to approximately 13 percent. At UM/Boston, the current 
vacancy rate of 10 percent is projected to increase to 20 percent 
in September; however, it is hoped that sufficient flexibility 
will allow that figure to be reduced to five percent. 

Mr. Kaplan said that the critical needs process has 
been made somewhat more complex by the fact that the Executive 
Office of Administration and Finance has issued a bulletin 
stating that prior established procedures can no longer apply 
until institutions of higher education submit two reports due by 
April 1 — the first involves a complete detailed spending plan in 
all subsidiary accounts, noting the surplus or deficiency in 
each account and the transfers expected; the second requires 
indications of the impact in FY 1977 of the filling of critical 
need positions certified in FY 1976. The University will submit 
this information within the required time limit. 

Trustee Gordon said that he hoped that the reports 
would show the impact the vacancy rates have had on programs ; 
for example, how many courses have been dropped and how the 



4877 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 

Status of 
Critical Needs 



4878 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 



FY 1977 Budget 
Update 



Status of 
Ohio Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

quality of instruction has been affected. Mr. Alfange said that 
the Amherst campus experienced its largest enrollment to date 
last fall; as a result of the 120 faculty vacancies, students 
had to be turned away from many of the basic introductory courses. 
There has been a severe impact on quality in that sections had 
to be taught in much larger numbers than in the past. The 
shifting of faculty from more specialized courses at the upper 
division level to the introductory courses had necessitated 
canceling those upper level courses. Mr. Kaplan said that 
situations such as described by Mr. Alfange would be included as 
part of the University testimony on its budget. 

Trustee Rothenburger said that a questionnaire had 
been circulated to various departments on the Boston campus; 
results showed that tutorial services and counseling had been 
affected in particular, and that some courses were dropped. 
Mr. Martus said that the Program Budgets Council of the Faculty 
Senate has been reviewing the budget process and has been develop-*- 
ing objective criteria which will be available at the end of 
the year. Trustee Gordon said that he hoped that all of this 
information could be coordinated into a presentation for the 
benefit of the Executive branch and the citizens of the Common- 
wealth. 

Chancellor Bromery added that other areas feeling the 
impact of fiscal stringency were (1) the library, where the 
acquisition rate has had to be lowered, (2) the Fine Arts Center 
and the Graduate Research Center, where maintenance standards 
have suffered, and (3) matching funds for work-study. 



The Chairman then asked for a report on the FY 1977 
Budget. Mrs. Hanson outlined themes which would be developed 
and touched on by President Wood and the Chancellors at the 
upcoming budget hearings. She said that considerable detail 
would be presented on the effects which dollar cuts and restric- 
tive language, particularly in personnel areas, have had on the 
University during FY 1976. She emphasized that the sacrifices 
which had to be made during this fiscal year cannot be repeated 
next year; reserves which had to be used are gone, and there is 
nothing to fall back on. Further emphasis will be made on needs 
for FY 1977 in order to maintain a basic quality of services 
and programs for the current enrollment. The University has 
been governing itself and managing phenomenally well given the 
budget cuts, she said, and a strong case will be made for obtain- 
ing the full $116 million budget requested by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The next agenda item was the status of land in Ohio. 
Treasurer Johnson reported that an agreement had been made in 
1973 to sell the land to Nationwide Development Company. In 
January, the Company requested termination of the agreement 
due mainly to zoning problems for Parcel II and because they 
were unwilling to meet the price established by the Committee 
on the basis of last summer's appraisal. Another developer is 



f 



" 



I 



4879 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

now interested in purchasing the land, and preliminary talks 
will begin within the next few weeks. 

Discussion then turned to the proposed Health Mainte- 
nance Organization , UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-052) . Secretary Hardy 
distributed additional material on this subject from the Student 
Government Association which, according to Mr. Somers, should 
have contained the amendment that the demands listed are nego- 
tiable. Also distributed was the final resolution by the Stu- 
dent Health Advisory Board. Chairman Carlson referred to the 
previous day's Student Affairs Committee meeting wherein UM/ 
Amherst students expressed several concerns about open enroll- 
ment in the plan after the first year, contracts with Medicare 
and Medicaid, and target financial assistance to those members 
of the community who could not afford the premium. He said that 
he believed that the contemplated implementation of the plan 
would take these concerns into account. He asked Mr. Averill, 
Director of the University Health Services, to comment on the 
proposed plan. 

Mr. Averill said that the motion before the Committee 
was to allow the University Health Services to enter into an 
agreement with the Valley Health Plan Inc., a private, non- 
profit corporation, to offer comprehensive health care to those 
who voluntarily enroll on a fixed annual fee basis as an option 
to their current insurance mechanism. This would allow faculty, 
staff, and their dependents to: (1) choose to receive health 
care through the Valley Health Plan as an option to the current 
Aetna program, and (2) use the University Health Services' 
facilities. In addition, if they wish, they can seek their 
medical care with Amherst Medical Associates. Non-university 
personnel and members of the community would also have the option 
of joining the plan, using the facilities of Amherst Medical 
Associates. Students will benefit from the plan in that high- 
quality physicians and more specialized services would be avail- 
able at University facilities, and payment on a fixed-share basis 
would allow for a decrease in health fees. Care for student 
dependents, a group which according to survey is the most under- 
served medically in the area, would also be an option under the 
plan. He added that a recent study of 200 student family groups 
indicates that 70 percent would like to receive their health 
care on a prepaid basis through the UHS , if the premium was 
$20-28 per month. Mr. Averill said that the projected premium 
for student dependents would be about $26 per month. 

Trustee Gavin referred to letters written by two doctor^ 
who expressed concerns regarding scheduling and limited experience 
in dealing with population groups of varying ages. Chairman 
Carlson and other Committee members agreed that the response to 
those concerns by the Medical Director of the Health Service 
seemed satisfactory. 



B&F Comm, 
3-24-76 



UM/Amherst — 
Health Mainte- 
nance Organiza - 
tion 
(Doc. T76-052) 



4880 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery said that his past fears that this 
type of plan would erode extant student health facilities had 
been allayed. He said he now thought that it would broaden the 
spectrum of services being offered. 

Referring to the vote recently taken by the Student 
Government Association, Trustee Gavin said it would be desirable 
to have an ongoing system of review and input from students. 
Their basic concerns are: who will be served by this plan; what 
plans will be made for implementation of financial assistance to 
those who cannot afford the plan; when Medicare and Medicaid can 
be contracted with; membership on the Board of Directors of the 
Valley Health Plan; and possible conflict of interest within 
that Board. Mr. Averill responded by saying that some of these 
concerns were not subject to the arrangement being proposed 
between the University and the Valley Health Plan, which is to 
contract primarily to offer services through the University 
Health Services facilities and to offer those services to the 
University community. Indirectly, however, the Valley Health 
Plan is supported by the University, and he therefore would 
i^ant to see the concerns addressed over a period of time. On 
the question of conflict of interest, Mr. Averill explained that 
during a four-month initial period, several Board members will 
be receiving federal grant money; the federal government, how- 
ever, has discussed the situation in depth, and according to 
Mr. Averill, feels comfortable with the arrangement. There has 
been full disclosure of this to the University, the federal 
government and the planning councils; funds have been awarded 
with cognizance of the issues involved. 

Mr. Rice of the Valley Health Plan said that his orga- 
nization had addressed and been supportive of many of the issues 
expressed by the students. He said, however, that he was very 
wary of being in a position where a supplier is negotiating or 
"dictating" some of the general policy directions of the Valley 
Health Plan — a situation, to him, inappropriate within the 
relationship which is being established. 

Mr. Role of the UM/ Amherst Student Senate said that 
"dictating" was an unfair term; only recommendations had been 
put forward for discussion. Ms. Guttenberg, Speaker-elect of 
the Student Senate, said that the proposed plan was being looked 
at as a model by other universities, and the Senate therefore 
would like to see it as good a model as possible. It would 
like to see its concerns responded to in writing before making 
any endorsement. Mr. Katz of the Student Health Advisory Board 
said that it was his feeling that the Valley Health Plan intended; 
to follow up on the recommendations to the best of its ability; 
he added that it was impractical or unrealistic to require a 
time limit. Ms. Estabrook, also of the Student Health Advisory 
Board, added that both that body and the Graduate Student Senate 
had unanimously approved the plan in concept. 



I 



I 



I 



4881 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 



UN!VERSfTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Gavin said that it would be desirable to have 
concrete discussions prior to implementation of the plan rather 
than at a later date. Chairman Carlson said that in order for 
progress to be made, a relationship based on good faith and 
mutual trust should be established. He added that he considered 
the concerns to be valid ones, and the appropriate voice for 
them should be that of the student representative to the Valley- 
Health Plan. 

After further discussion, Dr. Gage said that his office 
would pledge to see that student concerns are not set aside. He 
considered them legitimate conceptually, but would regret seeing 
them included at this stage in a motion which could impede pro- 
gress. He added that the University Health Services has con- 
sistently taken very seriously the advice of the Student Health 
Advisory Board regarding student services, and that it (the SHAB) 
has a legitimate role in making recommendations regarding a plan 
available to faculty. 

After motions were made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Chancellor of the Amherst campus 
and the Treasurer of the University to enter 
into a contract or contracts with the Valley 
Health Plan, Inc., a Health Maintenance Orga- 
nization, and Amherst Medical Associates, a 
private medical group practice, to establish 
an HMO through which faculty, staff and their 
dependents may receive comprehensive health 
care services on a prepaid basis. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the administration of the Amherst 
Campus to extend the existing student health 
program to provide for the optional inclusion 
of dependents of students for an additional 
fee; provided, however, no such extension 
shall be implemented until the fee has been 
determined and approved by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Trustee Rowland termed this action a momentous occasion for the 
University and wished the plan all success. 

The Committee then heard a report on Project No. 14, UM/Amherst — 
the purchase of Fraternity-Sorority Park, and Project No. 11, Projects No. 11 
financing of the Campus Center and Campus Center Garage (Doc. and 14 
T76-055) . Mr. Janis reviewed and summarized the financial history (Doc. T76-055) 
of both projects, and outlined the proposed votes in detail. 
When the items were opened for discussion, Mr. Gulko responded 



4882 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to Trustee Troy's question regarding a lease with the Building 
Authority for space in the Campus Center by saying that the 
intent of that action is to ensure that costs not be passed along 
to students in the form of a Campus Center fee. 

Mr. Somers pointed out that the $364,000 expenditure 
for Project 14 would be coming from surplus revenue in the dormi- 
tory accounts, revenue generated by excess fee collection in 
dormitory rents and earmarked for refurbishing and repairs. 
Using that money would be "robbing Peter to pay Paul"; that is, 
although it would ultimately result in prevention of a Campus 
Center fee increase, the sum would still be taken from student 
pockets through increasing rent . 

Trustee Dennis said that he was not comfortable in 
taking funds which were set aside for repairs because, at some 
point, those repairs would have to be made. It seemed to him 
that the problem would have to be contended with in the future. 

Chairman Carlson said that the present situation re- 
sulted from decisions made in previous years, decisions which 
were valid at the time but which no longer apply with respect 
to the need for this space. The situation is presently compli- 
cated by the near expiration of the short-term debt rollovers. 
As a member of the Building Authority, Trustee Troy added that 
he could see no other alternative than the one proposed. 

Speaking to Mr. Somers ' s point, Mr. Gulko said that 
the $364,000 land purchase money would come from the Residence 
Hall Trust Fund because it is currently the only source of avail- 
able funds and because the overall problem is tied in with the 
residence hall system. He felt that the "robbing Peter to pay 
Paul" idea did not apply, since a critical aspect of the resi- 
dence hall budget (which is under review) is utility costs, and 
alternatives are being sought in order to absorb these costs 
within the residence hall system over a three-year period with- 
out the students' paying for Project 14. Mr. Somers said that 
he understood that the residence halls fund was the only one 
which could be used, but he wanted to make clear that, as a 
result, a drastic rent increase could occur to finance dormi- 
tory rehabilitation. 

In response to Mr. Pill's charge that the actions on 
Projects 11 and 14 were necessary today because of incorrect 
management decisions and could be used as grounds to challenge 
fee increases, Trustee Gordon pointed out that a decision made 
five years ago, based upon conditions as they were then, could 
not be considered a "mistake in judgment" when conditions change 
in the interim. He said that originally the Campus Center had 
been a capital outlay project; when the State did not fund it, 
the Student Senate was consulted and encouraged the Trustees to 
continue with the building, agreeing with the then known facts. 
The history of the Campus Center thus shows that students did 
agree to pay its fees. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After more discussion, motions were made, seconded and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority to take the following 
actions on Project 14: 

(a) to finance $250,000 of preliminary expense 
in the bond issue for Project 11; 

(b) to sell the 8.8056 acres of land on East 
Pleasant Street, Amherst together with 
Buildings and improvements thereon as 
recorded in Hampshire Registry of Deeds 
Doc 5944, Book 1600, Page 715 to the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
for the sum of $364,000; 

(c) to use the proceeds of (a) and (b) to pay 
in full all principal and interest on any 
and all notes of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority that may have 
been issued to finance Project 14; and 

(d) to thereafter forthwith terminate Project 
14 in accordance with Article Twelfth of 
the Contract for Financial Assistance 
between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
acting by and through the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts and the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Building Authority 
dated June 1, 1971. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
be authorized and empowered, acting for and in 
the name of the Trustees, to buy from the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority a 
certain tract of land with buildings and improve- 
ments thereon comprising 8.8056 acres located 
on East Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 
as described and recorded in Hampshire Registry 
of Deeds Doc 5944, Book 1600, Page 715 and to 
pay therefore the sum of Three Hundred Sixty- 
Four Thousand Dollars ($364,000) from funds in 
the Resident Hall Trust Fund account, said 
transaction to be in such form as approved by 
the General Counsel of the University. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
vote of March 3, 1976 pertaining to its Project 



4883 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 



4884 



B&F Coiran. 
3-24-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

11 Financing request to the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority be re- 
scinded and that the following be substituted 
therefor : 

VOTED : That a request be made to the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority to 
undertake permanent financing for Pro- 
ject 11 (Campus Center and Campus Center 
Garage) at available rates for a total 
of $21,635,000 including refunding the 
present notes ($21,030,000), capital 
improvements ($205,000), Building Author- 
ity preliminary expense ($250,000) and 
financing expenses ($150,000); and with 
respect to the preliminary expenses, fur- 
ther to recommend that the University agree 
to enter into a lease with the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority for 
space in Project #11 for an annual amount 
equal to that portion of debt-service 
attributable to the amortization of the 
aforementioned preliminary expenses. 

The next agenda item was the Establishment of the 
Babette Schiller Spiegel Memorial Fund (Doc. T76-053) . Treasurer 



r 



UM/Boston — 

Babette 

Schiller Spiegel Johnson said that the fund was intended to support educational 

Memorial Fund 



(Doc. T76-053) 



UM/Boston — 
Media Center 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T76-057) 



programs for law offenders. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish the Babette Schiller Spiegel Memorial 
Fund for the purposes set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-053; further that the Chancellor 
of the University of Massachusetts at Boston 
be designated as the officer of the University 
to act in consultation with the Advisory Com- 
mittee as more particularly set forth in said 
Trustee Document . 

On the subject of the Media Center Trust Fund (Doc. 
T76-057) , Chancellor Golino said that in view of the past two 
years' activities, it has become clear that the Media Center 
has the potential of performing services for not only the edu- 
cational program at UM/Boston but also for the community, other 
: campuses of the University, and other public and private institu- 
: tions. Mr. Janis added that the Media Center has been funded by 
the state in the past; under the trust fund, production services 
would be paid for by outside contracts, and the academic services 
would be paid for with state funds. Trustee Rothenburger said 
that he was aware that there are students who want to become 
involved in the Media Center and that it could become a means of 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

satisfying some educational goals. A motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Treasurer of the University be authorized 
to establish a Media Services Trust Fund for 
the Boston campus, said trust fund to consist 
of fees, charges or rentals assessed for use 
of equipment or facilities of the Media Center 
at the Boston campus in connection with contracts 
made for production and related services, and 
available overhead payments and any other monies 
made available for the purpose by gift, grant 
or bequest; funds held in such trust fund may 
be disbursed for repair and maintenance of 
equipment at said Media Center, for the purchase 
of supplies, furnishings and additional equip- 
ment, for salaries and other remuneration of 
personnel engaged in production services at 
the Media Center and for related expenses, all 
as more particularly set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-057. 

Turning to the Establishment of General Summer Session 
Trust Funds for UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston, Mrs. Hanson said that 
in the past the University had been able to include summer ses- 
sion funds in its Operating Budget. Due to fiscal stringency, 
the campuses were faced with either discontinuing the summer 
sessions, offering them on a fee-assisted basis, or cutting back 
regular academic year programs. The proposed fee-assisted pro- 
gram would have the direct cost of instruction borne by the stu- 
dent, while other costs would be borne by the state. This struc- 
ture would keep the fees as low as possible. Mr. Lynton pointed 
out that not only is the immediate shortage of funds involved, 
but also the unwillingness by the state to underwrite a basic 
instructional responsibility of a state university or college. 

Chancellor Golino said that the campus came to the con- 
clusion of offering the session on a fee-assisted basis reluc- 
tantly; the only other choice would be not to offer the session. 
Trustee Troy said that the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy had discussed the issue previously and supported it. In 
answer to Trustee Dennis's question about past fees, Mr. Alfange 
said that those collected had gone to the state. He added that 
whereas other institutions see the summer session as a possible 
means of gathering revenue for the academic year, the University 
has to drain off resources from the academic year. The state, 
said Mr. Lynton, funds only those students enrolled during the 
normal academic year. 

Trustee Rothenburger said this fee escalation could 
result in attracting students who would normally go to more 



4885 



B&F Comm, 
3-24-76 



UM/Amherst , 
UM/Boston — 
Establishment of 
General Summer 
Session Trust 
Funds 



488B 



B&F Comm, 
3-24-76 



UM/Amherst , 
UM/Boston — 
New Fees and 
Fee Increases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

expensive summer schools. Trustee Rowland hoped that this would 
be looked at carefully when students are selected so that Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts students would not be excluded. Both 
Trustees requested that a student profile be done at the end of 
the first session to show what institutions attendees had come 
from. Trustee Gordon also voiced his desire for a complete 
review of the program and its impact. Trustee Rowland added that 
the campus administrations should consider charging a higher 
fee for non-University students. 

Upon motions made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish a UM/Boston General Summer Session 
Trust Fund to be used to implement a fee- 
assisted summer session at said campus. The 
Trust fund shall be used for the collection of 
the course fees established by the Board of 
Trustees and for the payment of all direct 
instructional costs of the summer session pro- 
gram; further, to recommend to the Board of 
Trustees that it direct the administration 
of the Boston campus to conduct a review of 
the said fee-assisted summer session and to 
report back to the Board in the fall of 1976. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish an Amherst campus General Summer 
Session Trust Fund to be used to implement a 
fee-assisted summer session at said campus. 
The Trust fund shall be used for the collec- 
tion of the course fees established by the 
Board of Trustees and for the payment of all 
direct instructional costs of the summer ses- 
sion program; further, to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees that it direct the adminis- 
tration of the Amherst campus to conduct a 
review of the said fee-assisted summer ses- 
sion and to report back to the Board in the 
fall of 1976. 

The next topic involved new fees and fee increases for 
the Boston and Amherst campuses. Chairman Carlson said that the 
discussion at yesterday's Committee on Student Affairs meeting 
made it evident that additional dialogue is necessary on the 
Amherst campus insofar as the proposed new fees and proposed fee 
increases are concerned. He explained that the Committee on Bud- 
get and Finance would be receiving specific recommendations for 
action at its April meeting. The proposed fees are tentative 
and still under study at the campus. Since these had been ex- 
tensively discussed at the Student Affairs Committee meeting the 



4887 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS B&F Comm. 

3-24-76 
day before, it was agreed that further discussion would be need- 
lessly repetitive. The Committee had desired early indications 
of any fee increases as a matter of information at this time. 
Financial aid and the waiver policy will also be discussed in 
April. Chancellor Bromery emphasized that the proposal for a 
rent increase has not yet been approved at the campus level and 
reiterated Chairman Carlson's statement that considerable fur- 
ther discussion is needed. 

Chancellor Golino explained that the Boston campus was UM/Boston — 
seeking a health service fee for part-time undergraduate students FY 1977 Trust 
in the amount of 50 percent of that charged to full-time students!; Funds and Fees 
in addition, graduate students would pay the same fee as full- 
time undergraduates. In answer to Trustee Dennis's question, 
Chancellor Golino said that the 50 percent rate was established 
because it was felt that part-time students were not so likely 
to use the health services as often as full-time students. 
Another rationale is that by charging only half of the regular 
fee, the campus's commitment to encourage attendance by part- 
time students would be enhanced. Trustee Rothenburger suggested 
that the action be subject to review at the end of its first 
year at which time it could be decided whether or not to make 
the fee optional. 



(Doc. T76-054) 



A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
commencing with the 1976-77 Academic Year, 
all part-time graduate and undergraduate 
students at the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston be required to pay a health service 
fee in the amount of 50% of the health service 
fee required of full-time students; further, 
that full-time graduate students be required 
to pay the same health service fee required 
of full-time undergraduate students; provided , 
that the aforesaid fees shall be authorized 
for the 1976-77 Academic Year only, and that 
the administration of the Boston campus be 
directed to review the said fee and to report 
to the Board no later than its April meeting, 
1977, on the feasibility of having said fee 
optional for part-time students. 



It was also 



VOTED 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
establish a course fee for the summer session 
at the Harbor Campus at the rate of $25.00 per 
credit hour. 



4888 



B&F Comm. 
3-24-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At 3:45 p.m., at Trustee Rowland's request, it was 



Executive Session VOTED : To enter executive session. 

At the conclusion of the executive session, the meeting 
was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 



ObladyS Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



ATTENDANCE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

March 31, 1976; 9:30 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Rowland, President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer, Clark, Rothenburger , Spiller; Mr. Callahan repre 
senting Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Member: Trustee Carlson 



Other Trustees: Trustees Morgenthau and McNeil; Mr. Colby repre- 



senting Trustee Winthrop 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical 
Studies; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for Physical Planning 
Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 



cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Chappell, Acting 
Dean of the Graduate School; Mr. Spielman, Dean of the School of 
Food and Natural Resources; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Represen 
tative 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 



dent Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative; Pro- 
fessors Blackwell, Hart, Patterson and Schiavo-Campo 

Guests : Ms. Susan Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; 



Mr. Kirstein, Student Trustee staff, UM/Boston 

The meeting was called to order at 9:30 a.m. by Chair- 
man Rowland, who welcomed visiting Trustees and members of the 
UM/Boston faculty as well as other guests. Chairman Rowland then 
said that she was reversing the order of the agenda in order to 
initiate consideration of the field and research stations of the 
University, which had been on the Committee's intended agenda 
for some months, before turning to the matter of the merger of 
Colleges I and II at UM/Boston. 

As President Wood had indicated in his memorandum to 
the Committee, she said, the effective use of the University's 
research and extension stations had long been a topic of interest 
and concern. Chancellor Bromery was present to speak briefly 
about some of the programs and issues connected with the field 
stations, which would be a recurring topic on future Committee 
agendas . 

At Chairman Rowland's request, President Wood presented 
a brief history of the development of the "camps, posts and 



4889 



University 
Field and 
Research 
Stations 



4890 

L-RP Comm. 
3-31-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

stations" of the University, which he said had begun with the 
"land grant" extension work established as a result of the 
Morrill Act over a hundred years ago. The field stations repre- 
sent the land grant character of the University, he said, origi- 
nally providing the results of research to farming communities, 
and more recently expanding their efforts to encompass the 
general area of food technology and food production. 

The University, he said, had historically maintained 
these research installations to assist the agricultural industry. 
In the 1960's, when the University built strength in the liberal 
arts and sciences, agricultural programs were held at a steady 
state. Today, food technology is again recognized as a prime 
national resource and the potential of these stations should be 
looked at in the coming months. The President suggested that 
with Dean Spielman 1 s retirement and the forthcoming appointment 
of a new dean for the School of Food and Natural Resources, this 
is an appropriate time for placing this item on the Trustee 
agenda. In these times of limited resources, he said, it is 
important to answer three questions: 1) What should the budgetary 
priorities of these stations be? 2) What is the internal ratio- 
nalization for their existence? 3) What is the potential for 
increasing their use for instructional activities, such as the 
University Without Walls and other "off-campus" programs? 

Chairman Rowland then asked Chancellor Bromery to 
comment. He said the field stations provide research, teaching 
and service functions as well as extension work. Their activities 
range from research on cranberries and apples, dairy products, 
cattle and poultry to inner city programs such as teaching wel- 
fare recipients how to provide more nourishing meals on a limited 
income. Among the stations administered by the Amherst campus, 
he said, were the South Deerfield Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, the Belchertown Horticultural Research Center, the Waltham 
Field Station, the Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory in Ware- 
ham, the Cranberry Experiment Station in East Wareham, and the 
Gloucester Marine Station. He said the Committee might be in- 
terested to know that the Marine Station had been instrumental 
in alerting the area to the menace of the "red tide." Chan- 
cellor Bromery then asked Mr. Spielman, Dean of the College of 
Food and Natural Resources, to explain the activities of each 
station. 



Dean Spielman stated that the College of Food and Nat- 
ural Resources, which consists of fourteen departments, conducts 
four major programs: resident instruction, extension services, 
research, and public service activities. The research program 
consists of the agricultural experiment stations, which encompass 
all of the facilities and all of the departments of the College. 
Research is carried on in various departments as well as in the 
"off-campus" facilities. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The first station mentioned by Dean Spielman was the 
facility at South Deerfield, the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
which he said could more accurately be called the "college farm." 
This facility of some 363 acres was purchased in 1961 so that 
the animal facilities and the agronomy field plot work could be 
removed from the Amherst campus. About a thousand students 
utilize this facility, including those at Stockbridge School. It 
is a teaching and research facility for both graduate and under- 
graduate students, and veterinary science is a major operation 
there. About ten to twelve faculty members are connected with 
the facility. The budget, this year approximately $255,000 
(supplemented by federal funds) , is primarily for personnel 
services. 

Dean Spielman said that although the Aquacultural 
Engineering Laboratory had originally been administered by the 
College of Food and Natural Resources , it was now under the 
direction of the School of Engineering. 

The Cranberry Experiment Station, he said, was estab- 
lished in 1909 at the request of the cranberry growers. There 
are seven faculty there and about fifteen non-professionals. The 
budget this year approximated $253,000 and was supplemented by 
federal money and research grants as well as money from the cran- 
berry industry. In addition to cranberry research, research is 
done on environmental problems such as water quality. The devel- 
opment of the cranberry juice industry was the result of research 
done by the University, and new uses for the pulp are being ex- 
plored. The pulp is, at the present time, primarily used as 
feed for livestock. Dean Spielman said that because of the 
limited budget, the University had not had the resources to 
fully utilize the facilities at this station. However, he hoped 
this station might become a general research and development sta- 
tion on environmental problems for Southeastern Massachusetts. 

As a result of interest by the fruit growers in the 
Commonwealth, money was contributed by them to purchase the land 
for the Horticultural Research Center in Belchertown, with the 
understanding that fruit research would be done there. The sta- 
tion is devoted primarily to teaching and research, but includes 
apple storage. Approximately $100,000 in state funds is provided 
for this facility, as well as varying amounts of federal funding. 
About 425 students use the center and about ten faculty members 
are involved in activities there. 

The Waltham Field Station was established in 1916. At 
the present time there are eleven faculty members at the station 
and one nonacademic professional. The program is concerned with 
providing research and educational services for the commercial 
vegetable and flower growers in Eastern Massachusetts, research 
for the shade tree wardens and commercial arborists, and the 
facility also serves as a diagnostic laboratory for the poultry 



4891 



L-RP Comm. 
3-31-76 

Agricultural 

Experiment 

Station 



Cranberry 

Experiment 

Station 



Horticultural 
Research Center 



Waltham Field 
Station 



4892 



L-RP Comm. 
3-31-76 



UM/Boston — 
Proposed Merger 
of Colleges I 
and II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

industry. This year the University received for this facility 
approximately $400,000 in state funds as well as about $200,000 
in federal funding. In addition to the services provided for 
commercial interests, a good portion of the time at the station 
is devoted to serving urban and suburban homeowners. For example 
last year there were 267 meetings attended by 19,000 people. In 
the home horticulture department, the staff answered 2600 letters 
32,000 telephone calls, and had 16,000 visitors. They conducted 
18,322 soil tests, about half for commercial growers. They 
diagnosed 20,858 diseased birds and poultry and provided 1,342 
samples of vaccine to the poultry industry. His long-range plan, 
said Dean Spielman, was to transfer the more basic and scientific 
research faculty to UM/Amherst as space becomes available and 
to use the Field Station primarily for problem-solving and ap- 
plied research for homeowners and industry. 

Trustee Spiller expressed regret that these good pro- 
grams suffer financially because of low visibility, and said he 
hoped it would be possible to give more attention to the problems 
in this area of University activity, which have been neglected. 

Chairman Rowland said that the majority of people in 
the Commonwealth were unaware of the amount and variety of serv- 
ices provided by the University and asked that the campuses pro- 
vide more of this type of information to the Committee. Presi- 
dent Wood suggested that the Amherst campus provide a policy 
memorandum on the process, development and long-range potential 
of these stations, as well as other possible utilizations of 
the facilities. 

Chancellor Bromery said that information could be pro- 
vided on the extension services as well as on the Marine Station, 
on which there had been no time to report at this meeting. 
Chancellor Golino said that he would be happy to provide informa- 
tion on the Nantucket station. Mr. Colby added that Commissioner 
Winthrop was very much interested in the agricultural field sta- 
tions, as it was his goal to increase agricultural production in 
the Commonwealth and he has developed a policy for the Common- 
wealth to this end. Since the Department of Agriculture is a 
regulatory body, it has no authority to carry out programs of 
research or production, and the future of these experimental 
stations would be of particular interest to the Commissioner. 

Chairman Rowland offered her apologies to Dean Spielman 
for being able to allot only a limited time to a discussion of 
the field stations and indicated that the Committee would return 
to further discussion of this topic in the late summer or early 
fall. 



i 



' 



r 



i 



Chairman Rowland then turned to the second item on the 
agenda, a request by Chancellor Golino for authorization to merge 
the two liberal arts colleges of the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston. She said that a considerable amount of material 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

addressing the several issues raised by the proposal had been 
circulated to the Committee. She stated her belief that the 
Committee had a rather special mandate in this matter. Its 
responsibility was not to debate the academic, administrative or 
budgetary wisdom of the proposal, but to reflect and comment on 
the degree to which the proposal is consistent with the explicit 
enrollment guidelines and development priorities for the Harbor 
Campus recommended by the Committee and adopted by the full 
Board of Trustees in August, 1975. 

Before opening the discussion, she said, she would like 
to comment briefly on the evolutionary nature of master planning 
within the University. There was a certain rhetorical tendency 
to refer to the master plan of the Boston campus as if it were 
both immutable and heaven-sent in the manner of the Ten Command- 
ments. A thorough search by the Secretary's Office had failed 
to unearth any formal approval by the Trustees of the rather 
sketchy academic master plan on which Sasaki Dawson based their 
site plans for the campus. She said the Sasaki Dawson plans 
already reflected a rather important change initiated by the 
campus director of planning, which had changed from 3,000 to 
2,000 the number of graduates assumed to be in each college. 

The assumption of the "cookie cutter" plan of identical 
liberal arts colleges, she recalled, was further modified in 
1971 by the proposal and adoption of the idea of a College of 
Public and Community Services. This college also marked a major 
departure from the assumption of colleges of identical size. 
The beginning of College IV as a College of Professional Studies 
was a further evolutionary break from the ideas of the founding 
fathers of the Boston campus, and she reminded the Committee that 
the enrollment guidelines adopted by the Committee and later by 
the Board differ in a number of significant respects from the 
assumptions implicit in the academic master plan of 1968. This, 
she said, is exactly as it should be. It is the purpose of 
master plans, she said, to serve as a context for effective 
educational decision-making, not to serve as a strait-jacket 
within which educational development must be confined. Therefore, 
she hoped the Committee would consider the proposal by Chancellor 
Golino, not in terms of its correspondence to some original 
charter, but rather in terms of its effect on the currently 
established priorities and guidelines for the development of that 
campus. Chairman Rowland said the Committee was not being asked 
to take a vote, but expressed the hope that the nature of the 
discussion might be conveyed to the members of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy, who would be meeting immediately 
following adjournment of this Committee and who would be consider- 
ing the same proposal from the point of view of its implications 
for the educational policy and program. 

Chairman Rowland then called upon President Wood, who 
said that at the time the two colleges were originally split, 
there had been considerable difference of opinion as to whether 



4893 



L-RP Comm. 
3-31-76 



L-RP Comm. 
3-31-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the colleges should be divided. At that time, he said, he had 
endorsed the campus decision, but had written a memorandum out- 
lining reservations on his part. He said his memorandum to the 
Trustees stated his position on the matter. 

Chairman Rowland then called on Chancellor Golino, who 
presented his reasons for proposing the merger. He said that 
when he came to the University, the campus was trying to do 
everything for everybody. The New Directions Committee had been 
established to develop the general thrust of the campus. Out 
of its report came the Board of Trustees policy guidelines for 
the campus in the fall of 1975. He had come to the conclusion 
that in order to accomplish these goals, it was necessary to 
strengthen the academic thrust by coordinating efforts and 
consolidating resources of the campus. He said he did not feel 
the goals anticipated at the time of the split of the two colleges 
had been realized, and he now thought the resources could be best 
utilized by the merger of the two. He felt strongly that as a 
University campus, UM/Boston should develop selected graduate 
programs, especially to serve graduates of UM/Boston. He said 
he was also committed to the extended-day program and maintaining 
access for those students who might not otherwise get higher 
education. He said today there is no extended-day program and 
few part-time students. Only through more effective utilization 
of resources can this program be realized. Some programs are 
currently combined, others would like to combine, he said, and 
some of the same subjects are taught by the two colleges. The 
structure of the campus, he said, had made difficult the provi- 
sion of effective programs for student services. He said that 
financial aid had had to be centralized. He concluded by saying 
that it was his belief that the merger would be in the best in- 
terests of the students. 

Chairman Rowland asked for comment by the Committee, 
and Trustee Spiller said his major concern was the effect of 
the merger on students. As long as student services were not 
adversely affected and that as long as there was not a major 
thrust toward graduate programs, which is not what the Trustees 
intended, he felt the merger was desirable. 



Trustee Clark stated her concern that student services 
be maintained and improved. She said that extended-day programs 
were badly needed and that she had hoped these would have devel- 
oped more quickly. The Kennedy Library and the State Archives 
would undoubtedly mean there would be more resources for grad- 
uate work, but she did not want to see graduate programs increase 
at the expense of undergraduates. Trustee Rothenburger said 
that the students were concerned that the merger might mean a 
thrust toward graduate programs with a cutback in undergraduate 
student services. He said that if students were assured that 
counseling services and undergraduate studies would not suffer 
from the merger, then he felt they would not be opposed to it. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Breyer said the issue seemed to be whether the 
merger was in line with the long-range goals for the campus. He 
said that he was in favor of smallness, but in this case, he 
did not see that there was a choice. Mr. Callahan indicated that 
growth and access were the transcending factors and that the 
Committee was committed to both, as well as to limited develop- 
ment of graduate programs. He said that student services should 
get first priority in the implementation of the proposed merger. 
Trustee Rothenburger urged that both faculty and students be 
involved in the implementation process in order to make sure 
that student services were not cut. Trustee Breyer observed that 
the merger was not a retreat from established policy, but merely 
a thrust toward departmental centers rather than two groupings. 
Chancellor Golino emphasized that the proposed merger was not 
an attempt to do away with the idea of smallness. 

Chairman Rowland asked Professor Marshall, the faculty 
representative, to comment. Professor Marshall said that the 
faculty was deeply divided on the issue of the merger, a subject 
she will discuss at the meeting of the Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee to follow. On the subject of student services, 
she said, not many steps had been taken until the time of the 
Gage report. Attractive results had occurred in the college 
setting with regard to student services and the building of 
skills. In College I, she said, the faculty had made a great 
effort to become involved and the result was that services were 
tied to programs. The programs in the two colleges, she said, 
were quite different and the support services for students 
would differ. 

Trustee Morgenthau asked what changes would occur in 
student services with the merger. Vice Chancellor Tubbs re- 
sponded that for the past two and a half years he had been trying 
to get agreement on a structure for student services without 
success, but with the knowledge that a merger would be proposed, 
a committee had finally developed a proposal for student services 
under a merged plan. Up to now, he said, counseling had been 
done on an jid hoc basis. A committee of faculty, students and 
administrators are currently working to determine how counseling 
services should be administered. Chairman Rowland added that 
counseling services would be an item on the agenda of the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs when it meets in May and that the 
Board of Trustees is very much concerned that there be an improve 
ment in student counseling services. 

In response to Trustee concerns about specificity of 
plans, Chancellor Golino said that he had been reluctant to 
elaborate plans of the merger prior to action by the Trustees on 
his proposal because it seemed presumptuous. He reiterated that 
it was not his purpose to change any goals or policies, but 
simply to find the best way to achieve them. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rothenburger asked if it would be possible for 
the Long-Range Planning Committee to recommend to the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy that a campus committee includ- 
ing students as well as faculty be established which would be 
involved in the planning for the merger. Chairman Rowland said 
that since Trustee Breyer is also a member of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy and since Trustee Rothenburger 
would be attending that Committee's meeting, they could report 
the consensus of the Long-Range Planning Committee. Trustee 
Clark further recommended that it be conveyed to the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy that the Committee on Long- 
Range Planning believes that the priorities established by the 
Board of Trustees are adhered to by the Chancellor's proposal 
and that the continuation and improvement of student support serv- 
ices be of the highest priority with the implementation of the 
merger. 

Mr. Callahan suggested that the recommendation also 
include a statement that if the merger goes through, student 
services be the point of concentration. It was the consensus 
of the Committee that the recommendations of Trustees Clark 
and Rothenburger and Mr. Callahan be accepted. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 11:00 a.m. 



I 



COladyi) Keith Hardy 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



1 



I 



1 



ATTENDANCE: 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACUITY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

March 31, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Troy; President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer, Burack, Morgenthau, Shaler, Mrs. Bluestone 
representing Trustee Fielding, and Mr. Colby representing Trustee 
Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Gavin 



Other Trustees: Trustees Anrig, Clark, McNeil and Rothenburger 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice 
President for Analytical Studies; Mrs. Wolfman, Assistant Vice 
President for Academic Programs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Bischoff, Associate 
Provost; Mr. Chappell, Acting Dean of the Graduate School; Ms. 
Craig, Acting Associate Dean of the School of Education; Mr. 
Fischer, Acting Dean of the School of Education; Mr. Gulko, Bud- 
get Director; Professor Mellen, Chairman of Special Committee on 
the Future School of Education; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for 



Student Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative; 
Professors Blackwell, Brown, Hart, Patterson, and Schiavo-Campo 

UM/Worcester : Professor Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Pro- 



fessor Smith, Faculty Representative-designate 

Guests : Mr. Callahan, Department of Education; Milton Kirstein, 



UM/Boston Student Trustee Staff; Ms. Susan Tehan, Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 11:00 a.m. The 
first item of business was a proposal of the Chancellor of UM/ 
Boston for the Merger of Colleges I and II. President Wood spoke 
first, reporting that the Committee on Long-Range Planning had 
discussed this proposal at its meeting just previous in the con- 
text of the long-range enrollment guidelines (Doc. T74-105) and 
the Statement of Priorities (Doc. T75-167) adopted for the Boston 
campus by the Board of Trustees. The Committee had asked Trustee 
Breyer to report to this Committee on the discussion. The Pres- 
ident continued that Chapter 75 provided that the Trustees had 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a non-delegable responsibility to pass on such issues as estab- 
lishment and abolition of colleges, schools, etc. 

The President observed that, unlike the procedure by 
which the college division had been authorized in 1971 and 1972, 
the consultation of the campus had been carefully conducted 
prior to the request of the Chancellor to bring his recommenda- 
tion to the Board. President Wood said he had reviewed his 
position as of the time of the split, and indicated that he 
supported the Chancellor's proposal. He then deferred to the 
Chancellor. 

Chancellor Golino reviewed the reasons for his pro- 
posal. He said he believed that a college system on the Boston 
campus was essential to the proper service of the diverse clien- 
tele the campus endeavors to serve. In that spirit, the three- 
pronged thrust of the system was (1) programs in liberal arts, 
(2) programs in professional management, and (3) programs in 
public and community service. A critical question, he said, was 
how to best serve the needs of students in an effective manner 
when resources are less abundant than in the past . He said he 
had come to the conclusion that the division of the liberal arts 
component into two Colleges was detrimental to the goals of the 
campus, and was tending to fragment academic activities which 
should be as well-coordinated as possible. 

The Chancellor said that, although he did not view the 
fiscal and administrative arguments as overriding, they were 
real and worth considering. Resources were not being used as 
best they could be at a time when administrative effectiveness 
was sorely needed. The administrative picture was confusing, 
and there was a high degree of redundancy. 

Chancellor Golino observed that there were actually 
only a few departments that were split; only eleven disciplines 
out of 33 academic units on the campus. One of the eleven, math- 
ematics, had recently received Assembly approval for reunifica- 
tion, while biology was experiencing some ambivalence. Only a 
small number of departments are emphatically against reunifica- 
tion. 

He stressed that the split presented an almost insur- 
mountable obstacle to Trustee-mandated extended-day programs, 
because the split departments do not have the critical mass to 
mount programs for an extended day. Neither of the seven-member 
departments of political science, for example, could offer 
extended-day programs on its own. 

The split was also harmful to the Division of Student 
Affairs, said the Chancellor. The separate Colleges impeded the 
best utilization of counseling and support services. In some 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

cases, course enrollment limits had been carried out on a College 
basis, and he said he did not believe, if enrollment in courses 
was to be limited, that it should be done on this basis. 

Chancellor Golino recalled that when he had come to the 
campus in 1973, he had had serious reservations about the effec- 
tiveness of the split liberal arts component, but that he had 
felt that it would be best to give it a chance to work. The 
split was now four years old, and he was still of the view that 
it was a detriment to the realization of the campus's mission. 

He observed that some have said that the reunification 
of the liberal arts component would divide the campus. He said, 
however, that the campus was already deeply divided. In fact, 
when he had been interviewed for the position of Chancellor by 
the Search Committee, he had been warned that this was a campus 
with serious divisions about which he would need to exercise 
leadership as Chancellor. He said he may even have waited too 
long. In any case, he believed that he had not moved too fast 
in initiating this discussion and in making his proposal, and he 
concluded that the reunification of the two Colleges would estab- 
lish a structure that would bring a greater cohesion to the cam- 
pus and facilitate the realization of the mission and goals of 
the campus. As a point of information, he added that he had 
worked out an implementation plan, but felt it presumptuous to 
put it forward before the Trustees had expressed their judgment 
as to the concept. 

Trustee Breyer reported for the Committee on Long- 
Range Planning at the request of Chairman Troy. That Committee 
had discussed the proposal extensively from the perspective of 
the Board policies on enrollment guidelines and program priori- 
ties. It had taken no position with respect to the proposal as 
that was regarded as the role of this Committee, but had felt 
strongly that, if there is to be a merger, student needs and 
interest should receive surpassing attention, that the long- 
range plan for selected graduate programs should not be affected 
one way or the other. Another point of discussion, said Trustee 
Breyer, had been the question of student loyalties. One of the 
points made, though admittedly this was not a point without 
controversy, was that a merger might facilitate departmental 
loyalties of students. 

Mr. Callahan laid special stress on one of the points 
made by Trustee Breyer, that if the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy sanctions the merger, optimal protection 
should be afforded the interests of students. 

Chairman Troy next called on Professor Marshall. Pro- 
fessor Marshall said she was in a difficult position because, 
although she personally opposed the merger, the UM/Boston faculty 
was almost evenly divided. Therefore faculty members with views 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on both sides were at the meeting to make presentations. There 
was deep division on this point, she said, and unity was needed 
to avoid damaging effects on the students. She offered the Com- 
mittee a history and profile of the liberal arts fission. 

While she had always thought that the split-College 
system was an attractive way to serve students in an urban uni- 
versity, the system had suffered from the beginning with a starva- 
tion diet. There had never been an explanation of the concept 
in the catalogue, there had been no recruitment of students on 
a College basis and students have, until this year, been assigned 
to the two Colleges at random. So she agreed that the system 
had never functioned very well, although the concept she regarded 
as attractive and positive. 

Despite the problems, however, the divided Colleges 
had achieved much: the diversity of programs had been increased, 
the support of students for the sister Colleges had been increased, 
interdisciplinary programs had been facilitated, and there were 
many benefits which should not be undone lightly. She described 
three faculty concerns. First, that the commitment to smallness, 
which was at the heart of the concept, should be safeguarded. 
While the concept had had problems, these were mainly due to 
poor, uncoordinated planning. Second, that the proper procedure 
had not been followed by the Chancellor. The faculty did not 
view the consultation process as exhaustive. Third, that there 
had been insufficient planning. The faculty had not been aware 
that the Chancellor had a plan for implementation, and she be- 
lieved that such a plan should be discussed prior to a decision 
on the concept of the merger. The accomplishment of the change- 
over would be difficult and time-consuming at a time when the 
Boston campus would be subject to an accreditation visit by the 
New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 



Professor Schiavo-Campo, faculty co-Chairperson of the 
UM/Boston Assembly, reported on the results of the referenda 
among students and faculty. The results of the faculty referen- 
dum had been: for the merger, 158; against the merger, 162. 
The results of the student referendum had been: for the merger, 
239; against the merger, 1, 281. Trustee Morgenthau asked what 
the legal implications of these votes were, and Professor Schiavc 
Campo offered the view, based on his understanding of the Trustee 
approved University Constitution, that a Trustee vote should be 
conditional on the approval of students and faculty. 

At the request of the Chairman, Assistant Counsel 
Bench stated that he had studied the Governance Statement (Doc. 
T73-098) and the Assembly Constitution and had found nothing in 
either document which would prevent Trustee consideration of the 
Chancellor's recommendation. He stated that the matter was to 
a large degree a "planning" issue which would be the primary 
responsibility of the Chancellor, but that there would inevitable 
be consequences with respect to curricula and academic personnel 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

matters, in which the faculty has been assured a voice. The 
issue of the merger could not be clearly stated to be either 
wholly a planning matter or wholly an academic matter, but the 
faculty referendum appeared to be the appropriate forum for the 
expression of faculty views as required by the Governance 
Statement . 

At any rate, the establishment or consolidation of 
schools or colleges must be considered by the Trustees, since 
this is a non-delegable power under Chapter 75 of the General 
Laws. Therefore, this issue is appropriately before the Trustees 

Chairman Troy recognized Professor Blackwell, who 
spoke in favor of the merger. Professor Blackwell said he had 
opposed the College split in 1972 as precipitous and irrational. 
It was his view that any structure should be best suited to the 
needs and interests of students, and should facilitate the 
interests of faculty research, growth and development. He ob- 
served that only seven of 22 disciplines are now divided. It 
would be possible to maintain interdisciplinary programs and 
diversity within disciplines in a departmental structure; this 
takes place in many universities within the country. Further, 
he pointed out that interdisciplinary programs on the Boston 
campus had preceded the two-College split and could continue. 
He agreed that extended-day programs were a serious problem 
because of the difficulty of achieving a critical mass of fac- 
ulty with split departments. 

Professor Blackwell continued that he believed that 
graduate programs on the Boston campus were a necessity if it 
were to become a first-rate urban university in eastern Massa- 
chusetts. A merger would facilitate these programs. 

Another serious problem, he said, was the barriers 
which the split-College system erected to student access. Cross- 
registration has been a problem, so that not all students on the 
campus can receive equal access to all programs. 

Chairman Troy next recognized Professor Hart. Speak- 
ing of division, Professor Hart said, he himself had felt deeply 
divided about this issue, and had only this past week made up 
his mind. At this point, he had become convinced of two things: 
First, that the liberal arts structure was in need of reform, 
and he was in agreement with much of what Chancellor Golino had 
said. He said, however, that there seemed to be a confusion 
between reunification of departments and reunification of Colleges 
He was not convinced that the two ought to be tied together. 
Second, while he agreed that reform was needed, he had come 
to the conclusion that the proposal before the Committee did not 
represent the most efficient way to go about it. Indeed, 
there was reason to fear that this proposal might well destroy 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the liberal arts fabric as it exists, not to mention undoing 
several years of strenuous and uncompleted work. 

Professor Hart then addressed several of the issues 
which had been raised. As to the expectations for reduction of 
costs, he said he hoped that the Committee had had an opportunity 
to read, not just the Fenstermacher report, but the several 
critiques of that report which pointed to substantially lesser 
savings. The costs to be reduced, whatever they are, should be 
measured against the countervailing cost in time and effort over 
the next few years. 

He next observed that the development of a selected 
graduate program should in no way be impeded by the maintenance 
of the split-College system. He said he supported such develop- 
ment, but felt that it should and could be intercollegiate in 
character. 

As for fears of harm to extended-day programs by the 
continued existence of a split-College system, Professor Hart 
pointed out that the chairmen of College I had already endorsed 
an extended-day program for next year, and the difficulties of 
a year or two of reorganization might actually serve to delay 
these programs. 

Addressing next the question of the academic logic of 
the division, Professor Hart said that it makes more sense every 
year. To arbitrarily end the developing diversity of several 
years would be to end overnight one of the most promising cur- 
ricular evolutions in American higher education, which would be 
a tragic waste. In his memorandum of February 9, Chancellor 
Golino had upheld a College system reflecting "a variety of 
curricular options." Professor Hart applauded that statement, 
but he disagreed that liberal arts is one, basic curriculum. 
His own experience had convinced him that the liberal arts need 
not and should not be one, basic curriculum. He said that 
Colleges I and II were very different, and he cited some of the 
differences, including departmental majors, freshman programs, 
and tutorial services. To forcibly rejoin the Colleges would 
curtail, he feared, the continued existence and development of 
curricular options, and both students and faculty would pay the 
price. 

He agreed, in conclusion, that it was administratively 
simpler to deal with three Colleges than with four, but that if 
such considerations dictate changes in educational organization 
and programs, then the faculty's position would become even more 
demoralizing and frustrating than it is already. In his experi- 
ence, a large departmental structure is mostly an obstruction 
to diversity. He concluded, then, that the time and effort 
required to splice the two Colleges might be more efficiently 
used to perfect the present system. 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Tubbs said that discussions have been 
proceeding for more than two years about what should be the 
proper function of counseling on the campus. Recently, a com- 
mittee of students and faculty had finally agreed among them- 
selves about what such counseling should be, and in his view 
this committee was in favor of a merger of the two Colleges to 
facilitate the interests of counseling. Mr. Tubbs then pointed 
out that the tutorial staff had recently asked for and received 
funding as a single tutorial staff for the first time, elimina- 
ting the collegiate division of the tutorial function. 

Professor Patterson next addressed the Committee, and 
observed that there was a deep and even division of the campus 
on this issue, and that there was a need for the judgment of the 
Chancellor to be heard. The Chancellor had been given certain 
responsibilities and powers by the Trustees, and he had made a 
judgment and offered a thoughtful proposal after careful study. 
He said one of the critical issues for the Trustees to address 
was whether the assigned leadership of the campus would be heard 
by the Board of Trustees on this issue. 

Professor Brown addressed the Committee, first saying 
that he had been among the faculty who had not participated in 
the debate on the campus . But the discussion which had taken 
place before this Committee had persuaded him of the need to move 
with prudence. While the division of the Colleges had been done 
irrationally and precipitously, it would be unwise to rejoin them 
precipitously and painfully. He suggested that it would be un- 
wise to present the campus to the accreditation committee next 
year in the state of disarray which would be the case were the 
campus to be in the midst of a painstaking and painful reorgani- 
zation. He recommended the establishment of a committee to 
review, and provide its advice on, the unresolved issues of fact. 

Trustee Burack made several points: (1) that, while 
the Trustees certainly had a responsibility to hear the Chan- 
cellor, they were not obliged to accept his judgment in all 
cases, (2) the plan for implementation should be studied by the 
Trustees before they pass judgment on the concept, (3) that the 
question of reorganizing in the midst of an accreditation visit 
was a serious one, and (4) that whatever structure is in place 
at the Boston campus, the access of all students to all programs 
should be guaranteed. 

Trustee Burack also expressed concern about the 
barriers described by Professor Blackwell and asked for an ex- 
planation. Professor Marshall said that the flexibility was 
such that this was not really a problem; a student who could 
not get into a course in an opposite College could be compensated 
with a course in his own College. Barriers to access were more 
a function of overcrowding than deliberate limitations to cross- 
registration. President Wood pointed out that the division of 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Colleges had been based on the idea that they should be of 
equal size, and that therefore the extent of cross-registration 
is restricted by this principle. This is not always apparent 
to a student coming in. 

Chancellor Golino sketched the planning process he 
contemplated: A Task Force would be jointly appointed by the 
Chancellor and the Assembly by April 15, representing all points 
of view on the campus. The charge of this Task Force would be 
the supervision of the merger and the monitoring of activities 
which would have to take place. The force would work with both 
the Assembly and the administration, and report frequently to 
the Assembly. Its primary responsibility would be to see that 
the merger occurs according to a schedule. 

He stressed that no policies or personnel procedures 
would be changed, but only the College structure. Specifically, 
the following areas of change would be completed by September 
1976: the new accounting and budgetary structure for each 
department, reassignment of space in the few departments which 
would have to move, election of combined departments, chair- 
persons, renewal and assignment of space by chairpersons. Re- 
maining to be accomplished over the following academic year 
would be: curricular revisions and governance. Trustee Burack 
asked how the changes would affect students, how they would be 
counseled, notified, etc., and how their programs would be 
changed. Chancellor Golino replied that their programs would 
not be affected next fall. All present offerings would remain 
in place. 

Trustee Morgenthau made two points: (1) that the 
maximum consensus possible had not been arrived at at the campus 
level, and (2) that she was not convinced that it was proper for 
the Trustees to make such a decision; she said the campus was 
perfectly capable of making this choice on its own. A Univer- 
sity cannot function, she said, without the positive, willing 
consent of the faculty. If a restructuring is effected without 
their consent, she said, they will take it out on their stu- 
dents. If she were shuffled around on a campus against her will 
she would resign. She did not believe the Trustees should make 
this decision when the "corridors of the campus were bloodied." 

Trustee McNeil raised the question of whether every 
avenue of improvement and adjustment had been made within the 
split-College system prior to this recommendation to phase it 
out. She said she could see advantages to the College division 
in terms of access to faculty and programs, and expressed con- 
cern about the effects the creation of large classes and large 
departments would have on this access. She said she could not 
support this action without better and fuller information on the 
implications of this change for student access. Professor 
Blackwell observed that classes could not be any larger than 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

they are now because the rooms are too small; the campus is 
physically oriented toward small classes. 

President Wood emphasized again that when the Colleges 
split in 1972, they did so on strictly numerical grounds; some 
departments actually divided the faculty alphabetically. Since 
the split, he said, there had been a steady trend of departments 
toward reunification until now only a few remained divided. This 
raised two critical questions in his eyes: (1) the issue of 
critical masses with two departments of political science, psy- 
chology, etc., and (2) how to evaluate professional standards 
with split departments. The latter, he said, was the other 
side of the argument for flexibility of program offerings. The 
Colleges never became colleges in the English tradition or even 
in the model of some American universities, such as Santa Cruz. 

A discussion followed on the merits of further con- 
sultation in hopes of achieving a consensus on the campus, and 
on the arguments for Trustee action based on confidence in the 
best judgment of the Chancellor. Trustee Morgenthau called for 
further efforts to achieve consensus, while Trustee Breyer said 
it would be possible to authorize the merger as the best judgment 
of the campus chief executive, while calling for attention to 
the concerns expressed by its opponents. He mentioned specifi- 
cally the possibility of accommodating resistance to physical 
reunification of certain departments. Several Trustees expressed 
concern at not knowing more details of the implementation plan. 

Trustee Burack said the only principle she was ready 
to vote on was that the rights and interests of students should 
be safeguarded. A motion to accept the Chancellor's plan in 
principle, without specifics of how he proposes to put it into 
effect, would be too vague for her to support. She would have 
to see this plan in writing before she could vote to authorize 
the principle. 

Trustee Anrig stated that the overriding consideration 
should be what is best for the students. If there are problems 
in serving the needs of students in two Colleges of 3,000 stu- 
dents each, shifting to a single College of 6,000 would not 
automatically rectify the problems. Quality can be found in all 
sizes. There are high-quality institutions all over the country 
of both sizes, he observed. What will best serve the needs of 
the special kind of student who comes to UM/Boston should be the 
central concern, whatever numerical arrangement or structure 
is used. The students at UM/Boston are commuting every day and 
this fact presents a special obligation on the part of the campus 
he said, to organize itself in ways which maximize the educational 
experience of these students who are on the campus for a limited 
time. They must develop a sense of belonging and the institution 
has a special responsibility to serve that unique student. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rothenburger expressed doubts that students 
in a commuter college could ever develop loyalty toward colleges, 
but said that he thought they could develop it toward depart- 
ments and disciplines. But the quality of education, he said, 
was not a function of structure, but of faculty attitude and 
faculty-student ratio. 

After further discussion of the character of qualifica- 
tion desirable in any Trustee action, a motion was made and it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
accept the recommendation of the Chancellor of 
the Boston Campus that a single college of 
liberal arts be established by the merger of 
Colleges I and II, provided that the imple- 
mentation of the merger take place giving 
first priority to the resolution of student 
problems, including effective response to 
their needs and the expansion of their 
opportunities; provided further that the 
implementation of the merger should be 
flexible, taking appropriate account of 
differing procedures and differing patterns 
of development over the past five years; and 
provided further that the plan for implemen- 
tation be circulated to the Board of Trustees 
prior to such implementation. 

For the motion: four; against: two; abstaining: one. 

The Committee then moved to a Progress Report on the 
School of Education. Chancellor Bromery reported that the Spe- 
cial Committee on the Future School of Education had completed 
a final draft of a report, which was presently being circulated 
to the School. In the meantime, Professor William Mellen, Chair- 
man of the Committee, would make a report on its findings to the 
Committee. Chairman Troy recognized Professor Mellen. 

Professor Mellen first described the composition of 
the Committee, and described the kind of areas to which it 
addressed itself. It attempted to deal with the criticisms 
and weakness identified by the Goodlad and Faculty Senate reports, 
but noted that most of these were structural and organizational, 
and that they had been largely remedied. It had focused, then, 
on the strengths of the ways that the School of Education can 
be nurtured. He described the general view of the future: 

— The School of Education should continue to offer a 
comprehensive program. Even though the resources of the School 
may remain level or even decline, the Committee believed that 
the various components of the programs should be maintained. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

— The School of Education should reduce its pre-service 
educational programs, but this reduction should be carried out 
in cooperation with the campus as a whole, since not all students 
who plan to teach are found in the School of Education. However, 
the School should maintain its pre-service function in order that 
its most unique pre-service programs might serve as models for 
other institutions throughout the Commonwealth. In the next 
five years, the Committee foresaw that the pre-service education 
majors would drop from about 800 to about 400. 

— The in-service component, which serves working teach- 
ers as well as personnel from other agencies and institutions 
such as Human Services, should be expanded and enlarged, pri- 
marily to meet the needs of school systems in the Commonwealth. 
This effort would require support and guidance from the campus, 
the President's office and from the Board of Trustees, and would 
require close cooperation with the Department of Education. 

— The doctoral programs are the source of the School's 
national reputation, and it both is and should remain the cap- 
stone of the School. The placement of graduates of the doctoral 
program has been very high. The size of the doctoral program 
must be reduced, however; specifically, the number of graduate 
students in terms of FTE should remain the same, but a larger 
portion of these should be master ' s-level candidates. 

— The School has a good record in professional public 
service, and the Committee believed that selected, appropriate 
involvement in such public service should be maintained and 
given high priority, especially for agencies within the Common- 
wealth. 

— In conclusion, the Committee sees the School of 
Education remaining as a major comprehensive, professional school 
on the campus. It expects to hold a level of 90 faculty out of 
100 authorized. The tone of the report, said Professor Mellen, 
was positive, with caveats about limited resources and about 
the need to concentrate on the problems and needs of the campus 
and the Commonwealth, rather than the world at large. 

Chancellor Bromery added several points to Professor 
Mellen' s report. He said this study was timely, that it would 
have been due even without the problems the School had encoun- 
tered. He remarked that the report had addressed itself to the 
need to set priorities; it is no longer possible to think about 
what one might like to add in the way of programs without con- 
sidering what might be deleted. Finally, he observed that this 
report was in harmony with the directions being taken by the 
Campus Commission on Goals and Missions. 

Trustee Anrig spoke next as a member of the Committee 
on the Future School of Education. He began with two historical 



4907 



F&EP Comm. 
3-31-76 



4908 



F&EP Comm, 
3-31-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

items. First, he had been asked to come to the UM/Boston campus 
in 1970 to look into the future of teacher education on the Boston 
campus, and he said he was proud that no recommendation for 
another School of Education had emerged from that study. In 
fact, he said, he was generally inclined to be critical of Schools; 
of Education, although in the present situation he was pleased to 
be on the other side. Second, in 1965 he had served on a com- 
mittee to study the doctoral program of the Amherst School of 
Education. After careful study, that committee had been so 



negatively impressed by the quality of the doctoral program at 
that time, it recommended that it be closed immediately. He 
offered this observation as support for the need to contrast the 
present, solvable problems of the School of Education with the 
gross problems the School had had in earlier years. 

The Trustees should appreciate that the problems are 
problems of action, rather than of inaction: problems of inac- 
tion are far more difficult to correct. He said that he had 
been concerned that the possible malfeasance of two individuals 
in the School might be used against the School as a whole in a 
kind of McCarthyism. The School has had a great deal of vigor, 
and Acting Dean Fischer had done an excellent job of correcting 
many of the problems. The Trustees should be reassured that as 
a new Dean takes over, the administrative problem will be behind 
us . 

The programmatic problem was based on a central fact: 
a great change in the market for professional educators. In 
this context, there was a need to make a choice: to stop doing 
(or do less of) something, allowing a budget reduction, or to 
start doing something else. Usually, it is not possible for a 
campus to carry out this kind of reordering of priorities on 
its own, but he stressed that this Committee had "bitten this 
bullet." The report proposes that the School do less of some 
things, and more of some other things, and this Trustee Anrig 
said he enthusiastically supported. 

With respect to pre-service teacher education, he said 
he agreed that the program should be reduced (in the campus as 
a whole, however; not just in the School of Education) to a 
point lower than the student demand to place it in harmony with 
the job market. This should be done out of respect for the stu- 
dents going through the program. At the same time, he strongly 
urged that the direction of the School be focused on meeting the 
rising demands being made of the existing teacher force — such as 
implementation of Chapter 766. He believed that the state's 
public University in the land-grant tradition has the responsi- 
bility for meeting these needs. 

President Wood asked Trustee Anrig for his view of the 
undergraduate role of the School of Education with respect to 
that of the state colleges. Trustee Anrig replied that the Com- 
mittee had addressed itself to this question, and had felt that 



f 



r 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

it should not do what others are already doing, but should do 
what others are not doing; namely, doctoral programs. However, 
a certain undergraduate component is necessary to provide support 
for a graduate component. At the same time, the University had 
the resources to provide support and research for pilot programs 
in undergraduate teacher preparation which the state colleges 
can then adopt. Further, the School of Education's undergraduate 
program had pioneered in reaching out to populations that other 
schools had not reached, and it would be a shame, he said, to 
drop that commitment. 

President Wood agreed that the graduate program had 
achieved two major things under the guidance of the former dean: 
one was innovation in admissions and recruitment of faculty, and 
the other was innovation in the character of graduate instruction 
He asked if there was a conceptual basis on which the School 
could strive for a national position. 

Trustee Anrig said that he believed that the innovation^ 
of the School of Education had had a "spillover effect" to other 
Schools throughout the country. The School had attempted to be 
flexible, and any time an institution tries to be flexible, mis- 
takes will be made. But the fact that mistakes were made in 
reaching out to new frontiers should not cause the School to pull 
back; it should stay out there. He said there should remain a 
healthy mix between students who go directly on to graduate work 
and in-service teachers who return for graduate work. There 
should also remain a commitment to minority students, an area 
in which the University had accomplished much and in which it 
ought to be proud. He added, however, that he believed the 
rhetoric ought to be softened, that expectations ought to be 
tempered while ambition is maintained. 



A discussion ensued about the character of in-service, 
off -campus education. Vice President Lynton asked Trustee Anrig 
to comment on the possibility of such education not being degree- 
granting or credit-bearing. Trustee Anrig explained that school 
districts are less interested now in University degrees and 
credits than they are in the upgrading of their staffs; they will 
grant their own credit for purposes of promotion, compensation, 
etc. In this respect, they will grant their own form of credit 
for in-service study pursued by their teachers. Vice President 
Lynton observed that this was a problem in that the Commonwealth 
will not fund education which is not credit-bearing and degree- 
granting. Trustee Anrig said, however, that the General Court 
was interested in looking at this question. 

Trustee Anrig added that there was a danger, however, 
in not counting off-campus, in-service education as part of the 
FTE load of the School of Education. If such a distinction is 
made, there is a danger that such programs will be regarded as 
just another form of Continuing Education, with its implications 



4909 



F&EP Comm, 
3-31-76 



4910 



F&EP Comm. 
3-31-76 



UM/ Worcester — 
Department of 
Laboratory 
Medicine 
(Doc. T76-049) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for faculty attitude. If such programs are to be pursued, it 
would be important for the University to emphasize that this 
kind of effort by faculty will be recognized and rewarded. 

Vice Chancellor Alfange thanked Professor Mellen and 
Trustee Anrig for their reports, and he emphasized that one of 
the outcomes of the Committee's work would be the integration 
of the School of Education with the rest of the University. The 
School had come to regard the rest of the University and its 
standards and methods as hidebound; now the efforts of the 
School would be more closely coordinated with the rest of the 
University community. Chancellor Bromery added, however, that 
he did not believe that the innovations and achievements of the 
School would have happened if there had not been some degree of 
isolation and separation — an incubation period. Mr. Alfange 
agreed, and said that he was referring mainly to the application 
of University-wide standards. 

Trustee Burack asked that, when the final report of 
the Committee on the Future School of Education is presented to 
the Trustees, it be accompanied by a summary which compares 
what should happen with what is happening at present, and which 
suggests necessary changes in Trustee policy, if any. 

The next item was a proposed Department of Laboratory 
Medicine at UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-049) . Dr. Lynton explained 
that in June 1975, then Acting Dean Butcher had presented this 
Committee with a list of 28 departments at the Medical School as 
part of a proposed reorganization plan. Of those 28, Laboratory 
Medicine was the only one not in existence already. The Committee 
on Health Affairs had reviewed this proposal in depth at its 
February 24 meeting, and had endorsed it. There was no dis- 
cussion, and it was moved, seconded, and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
establish a Department of Laboratory 
Medicine at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Worcester, as set forth in 
Doc. T76-049. 

Because of the lateness of the hour, the Committee 
agreed to postpone the last item on the agenda, a discussion of 
centralization and organization within the University, to its 
next meeting. It was said that this matter should receive care- 
ful consideration, and should therefore be placed first on the 
agenda. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 



I 



I 




(6^( 




(lady sM Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



t 



ATTENDANCE : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

April 7, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 
The University Library- 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey, President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Robertson, Shaler, Spiller and 
Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, Assistant 
Secretary; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Member: Trustee Rowland 



Other Trustees : Trustees Abrams, Breyer, Burack, Clark, Cronin, 
Eddy, McNeil, Morgenthau, Rothenburger , Shearer, Mrs. Bluest one 
representing Trustee Fielding, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig, Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop , and Secretary 
Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President: Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 



ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President 
for University Policy; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Post, Assistant Vice President for Physical Planning 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; Mr. 
Melley, Public Affairs Director; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student 
Representative; Ms. Tillona, Special Assistant to the Chancellor; 
Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs , Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Hittelman, Acting 
Faculty Representative 

The meeting was called to order at 2:15 p.m. Before 
addressing the agenda, Chairman Healey informed the Committee 
that, in the interests of safety and orderly conduct of the 
meeting, no more persons would be admitted to the meeting room. 

The first item on the agenda consisted of Classifica- 
tions of Position Titles at UM/Worcester (Docs. T76-061, T76- 
058). Two of the positions to be created were: Vice Chancellor 
for Health Affairs and Vice Chancellor for Administration and 
Finance. 

Chancellor Bulger first addressed the position of 
Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. The person to occupy this 
position would be the senior campus official responsible to the 



4911 



UM/Worcester — 

Classifications 

of Position 

Titles 

(Docs. T76-061, 

T76-058) 



491- 



„A> 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor for all health care service activities as they relate 
to outside institutions and constituencies. Such a person 
would need to understand the policy issues, and would need the 
skill and tact essential for dealing effectively with these 
several constituencies and institutions. He or she would help 
the Medical Center determine what it could do to assist these 
outside interests without compromising its educational mission. 

Speaking next to the position of Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance, Dr. Bulger explained that this per- 
son would be responsible to the Chancellor for the management 
and business affairs of the entire Center. At present, one per- 
son holds the dual position of Associate Dean for Administrative 
Affairs and Hospital Director. Now that the Hospital has opened 
and is functioning, the Hospital Director's burdens have in- 
creased, while the need for a senior management and business 
officer for the Medical Center as a whole remains, and indeed 
becomes more imperative than ever. 

The next position was the Associate Dean for Scientific 
Affairs. Chancellor Bulger said a person was needed to provide 
plans and a focused thrust in basic and clinical research, since 
it was clear that the campus could not plunge "willy-nilly" into 
scientific research with finite resources. He recommended the 
appointment of Professor Reginald W. Butcher for this position. 
Professor Butcher had held the position of Acting Dean of the 
Medical School, and Chancellor Bulger said he wanted to keep 
his administrative expertise. 

President Wood asked Trustee Spiller to comment in his 
capacity as one of the Trustee members of the Organization Design 
Review Committee. Trustee Spiller reported that the ODRC had met 
during the previous week with Chancellor Bulger to review the 
positions summarized. The Committee had reviewed the material 
presented by Hay Associates and Mr. Kaplan, and had reviewed 
such other considerations as how the positions fitted into the 
administrative structure, salary maximums and minimums, etc. 
The Committee had found the presentations complete and satis- 
factory, and it recommended Board approval. 

Vice President Janis added that, from a management 
and organizational point of view, these positions had been dis- 
cussed with the campus for a period of several weeks. From 
this point of view, he said, these positions made good sense. 

Trustee Robertson, the other Trustee member of the 
ODRC, said he also recommended favorable action on these posi- 
tions. The Chairman said he appreciated the study and careful 
examination which had been applied to these positions. On 
motions made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the classification of two position titles as 
set forth in Trustee Document T76-061. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Exec. Comm. 

4-7-76 
VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the classification of position title as set 
forth in Trustee Document T76-058. 

Chairman Healey then asked Chancellor Bulger to address! UM/Worcester — 



4S13 



two proposed Personnel Actions for UM/Worcester (Docs. T76-062, 
T76-059) . The first was the appointment of Dr. Philip S. Caper 
as Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. Dr. Caper is a highly- 
accomplished person in medicine and health policy, indeed a 
national figure in health policy and, in Dr. Bulger's view, 
would always be concerned for the impact that health policy 
decisions would have on people. Dr. Caper was by far the first 
choice of the Search Committee. 

Mrs. Bluestone expressed the extreme pleasure of Com- 
missioner Fielding at this proposed appointment. She said he 
was "delighted" at the prospect of bringing Dr. Caper to the 
Medical School. 

The second Personnel Action was for the appointment 
of Dr. Butcher, as described earlier, to the position of Asso- 
ciate Dean for Scientific Affairs. Motions were made and sec- 
onded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the appointment by the Chancellor of the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester of 
Dr. Philip S. Caper as Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs, effective July 4, 1976, and 
to approve the personnel action as set forth 
in Trustee Document T76-062. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the personnel action as set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-059. 

The next item on the agenda was a proposed Reduction in 



the FY 1977 Budget Request for the University Hospital (Doc. 
T76-063) . Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance, explained the reasons for the reduction, which in- 
cluded the later-than-expected Hospital opening and changes in 
the data for calculating utility costs. Upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the recommendation of the President to 
approve the request of the Worcester campus to 
revise the Fiscal Year 1977 budget request for 
the University Hospital from $11,175,181 as 
appears in Doc. T75-033 to $9,500,000 as is 
summarized in Doc. T76-063. 



Personnel 

Actions 

(Docs. T76-062, 

T76-059) 



UM/Worcester — 
Reduction in 
FY 1977 Budget 
Request for the 
University Hos- 
pital 
(Doc. T76-063) 



4914 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-76 

UM/Amherst — 
Financing of 
Projects No. 
11 and 14 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman turned next to several proposed actions 
related to the Financing of Building Authority Projects No. 11 
; and No. 14 at UM/Amherst. He remarked that, since nearly all 
Trustees were present, he desired all discussion to take place 
at this meeting, and added that he would not recognize non- 
Trustees to speak on this subject at the full Board meeting. He 
recognized Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance. 

Mr. Carlson reported that the Committee on Budget and 
Finance had engaged in an extensive discussion of the financing 
of these projects and he would not, with the Chairman's permis- 
| sion, recapitulate the discussion which was fully reported in 
the minutes. He introduced a series of motions, eight in all, 
which would carry the financial arrangements into effect. 

The first motion would rescind a vote of March 3, 1976, 
and substitute a new action. In the substituted motion, the 
amount of the bond issue for Project No. 11 would be increased by 
$500,000 to $23 million. Of this increase, $250,000 would be 
for roof repairs to Project No. 11, while approximately $300,000 
would be for preliminary architectural and financing costs for 
Project No. 14. He pointed out that the motion also proposed a 
lease arrangement between the University and the Building Author- 
ity in an amount sufficient to repay the preliminary architectura 
and financing costs cited above. 

Mr. Martus was recognized and asked Trustee Carlson 
for the source of the funds to pay off the bond issue. Trustee 
Carlson replied that it was his understanding that the funds 
would come from the lease arrangements to be carried into effect 
by motions to be made later in the meeting. He then asked Chan- 
cellor Bromery for the source of the $300,000 in architectural 
and financing costs. Chancellor Bromery said the funds would 
come from the campus operating budget, but he could not identify 
the account because the operating budget did not yet exist. Mr. 
Martus argued that the source of the funds should be specified 
to ensure that they not be taken from students' pockets. 

After further discussion, it was agreed that a commit- 
ment could be made that rental payments under the lease would 
not be paid from student fee-based funds. The motion was sec- 
onded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees rescind 
the vote of March 3, 1976 pertaining to its Pro- 
ject 11 Financing request to the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority and to sub- 
stitute therefor: 

VOTED : That a request be made to the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority to 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

undertake permanent financing for Project 
11 (Campus Center and Campus Center Garage) 
at available rates for a total not to ex- 
ceed $23,000,000 including Building Author- 
ity preliminary expense of not more than 
$300,000; and with respect to the prelim- 
inary expenses, further to recommend that 
the University agree to enter into a lease 
with the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority for space in Project #11 
for an annual amount equal to that portion 
of debt-service attributable to the amor- 
tization of the aforementioned preliminary 
expenses ; provided that rental payments 
for such lease shall not be paid from the 
student fee-based budget. 

Trustee Carlson introduced six additional motions, 
about which there was no discussion, and it was accordingly 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it take 
the following actions: 

VOTED : That the making of a Fourth Amendment to the 
Contract for Financial Assistance dated as of 
January 31, 1967 between the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority pursuant to Chapter 773 of 
the Acts of 1960 as amended and providing, among 
other things, for inclusion of certain expense 
in the Cost of the Project and for an increase 
in the Maximum Cost of the Project to which such 
Contract pertains, be and the same hereby is 
authorized; that the form of such Amendment 
presented to this meeting and each term, condi- 
tion and provision therein contained be and the 
same hereby are approved; that said Trustees or 
a majority thereof be and hereby are authorized, 
in the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to sign, acknowledge if deemed 
advisable and deliver an Amendment in the form 
presented to this meeting and providing, among 
other things, for a Maximum Cost of the Eleventh 
Project, as defined in said Contract as hereto- 
fore amended, of Twenty-Three Million Dollars 
($23,000,000) and to cause the common seal of 
said University and of said Trustees to be 
affixed thereto; and that the taking of such 
action by said Trustees shall be conclusive 
evidence that the same is hereby authorized 
and that the form of Amendment so executed is 
as hereby authorized and approved. 



■r 



4915 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-76 



4916 



Exec. Coram . 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the making of a "Campus Center Project 

University Store Revenue Agreement" between the 
Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, acting in the name and on behalf of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority 
pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, 
as amended, pertaining to the Management and 
Services Agreement between the Trustees and 
the Authority relating to the Eleventh Project 
of the Authority ("the Campus Center Project") 
dated as of December 1, 1969, and the operation 
and maintenance of university store facilities 
at the said Eleventh Project, is hereby autho- 
rized; that the form of such Campus Center Project 
University Store Revenue Agreement presented 
to this meeting (Trustee Doc. T76-064) and each 
term, condition and provision therein contained 
be and the same hereby are approved; that said 
Trustees or a majority thereof hereby are autho- 
rized in the name and behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to sign, acknowledge if deemed 
advisable and deliver a Campus Center Project 
University Store Revenue Agreement in the form 
presented to this meeting and to cause the seal 
of the said Trustees to be affixed thereto; and 
that the taking of such action by said Trustees 
shall be conclusive evidence that the same is 
hereby authorized and that the form of the 
Campus Center Project University Store Revenue 
Agreement is as hereby authorized and approved. 

VOTED : That the making of a "Campus Center Project 
Food Services Revenue Agreement" between the 
Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, acting in the name of and on behalf 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the 
University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, 
as amended, pertaining to the Management and 
Services Agreement between the Trustees and 
the Authority relating to the Eleventh Project 
of the Authority ("the Campus Center Project") 
dated as of December 1, 1969, and the operation 
and maintenance of food and beverage services 
facilities at the said Eleventh Project, is 
hereby authorized; that the form of such 
Campus Center Project Food Services Revenue 
Agreement presented to this meeting (Trustee 
Doc. T76-065) and each term, condition and 
provision therein contained be and the same 
hereby are approved; that said Trustees or a 
majority thereof hereby are authorized in the 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

name and behalf of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts to sign, acknowledge if deemed advisable 
and deliver a Campus Center Project Food Services 
Revenue Agreement in the form presented to this 
meeting and to cause the seal of said Trustees 
to be affixed thereto; and that the taking of 
such action by said Trustees shall be conclusive 
evidence that the same is hereby authorized and 
that the form of the Campus Center Project Food 
Services Revenue Agreement so executed is as 
hereby authorized and approved. 

VOTED : That the making of a First Amendment to the 

Management and Services Agreement dated as of 
December 1, 1969 between the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, acting in the name 
and on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
and University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as 
amended, pertaining to the Eleventh Project of 
the Authority, be and the same hereby is autho- 
rized; that the form of such First Amendment 
to such Management and Services Agreement pre- 
sented to this meeting and each term, condition 
and provision therein contained be and the same 
hereby is approved; that said Trustees or a 
majority thereof be and hereby are authorized, 
in the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to sign, acknowledge if 
deemed advisable and deliver a First Amendment 
to such Management and Services Agreement in 
the form presented to this meeting and to cause 
the common seal of said University and of said 
Trustees to be affixed thereto; and that the 
taking of such action by said Trustees shall 
be conclusive evidence that the same is hereby 
authorized and that the form of First Amend- 
ment to such Management and Services Agreement 
so executed is as hereby authorized and approved. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

request the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority to take the following action on Pro- 
ject 14: to forthwith terminate Project 14 in 
accordance with Article Twelfth of the Contract 
for Financial Assistance between the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts acting by and through the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts and 
the University of Massachusetts Building Author- 
ity dated June 1, 1971. 



4917 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-76 



4918 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees authorize the Trea- 
surer of the University to accept a Deed from 
the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, 
pursuant to Chapter 773 of the Acts of 1960, as 
amended, to the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts relating to a parcel of land in 
Amherst, Massachusetts, being the premises de- 
scribed in the Deed of Fraternity-Sorority Park, 
Inc. to the Authority dated July 23, 1971, and 
recorded in Hampshire Deeds Doc. 5944, Book 1600, 
Page 715. 

Trustee Carlson then offered a motion which would 
authorize the payment of $364,000 from the Residence Hall Trust 
Fund to the purchase authorized by the previous vote. 

Trustee Cronin was recognized to make a presentation 
in opposition to the motion. He interrupted his presentation to 
relay a request that students demonstrating outside the building 
be admitted to the meeting. Chairman Healey stated the view 
that the elected student representatives were authorized to 
represent the student point of view, and that the Chair was not 
obliged to admit all students who might wish to attend. Presi- 
dent Wood added that there were provisions for the presentation 
of student views, and that the concept of an "open meeting" did 
not include a commitment to the direct participation of every 
student. Upon the advice of the Department of Public Safety, 
Chairman Healey reaffirmed his decision not to admit other 
students. 

Trustee Breyer observed that, with respect to the pro- 
posed lease arrangement in the previous vote, the students' 
position had prevailed in that assurances against use of the 
student fee-based budget had been incorporated into the action. 
He asked Trustee Cronin whether those students demonstrating 
outside the building were aware of this concession, and he 
suggested that it might well be explained to them. Trustee 
Cronin excused himself from the meeting at this time for the 
purpose of conveying this information to the students outside. 
He did not return until the meeting had adjourned. 

Trustee Eddy asked whether, with respect to the motion, 
there were any other funds which could be used to purchase the 
parcel of land. Vice President Janis replied that he and Trea- 
surer Johnson had conducted an extensive search to determine 
whether other Building Authority funds were available, and they 
had concluded that there were no other funds. If the residence 
hall trust fund were to become depleted, Trustee Eddy asked, 
what provision would the campus make for the renovation of 
residence halls? Chancellor Bromery pledged to make every 
effort to replace the funds in the residence hall trust fund. 
The problem in this case was that the University would default 
on its bonds if it did not take this action at this meeting. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The University must soon, he added, develop a long-range solution 
to the problem of maintenance of the residence halls. Vice 
President Janis made the point that there was a bright spot in 
this picture in that debt service on many of the residence halls 
would be completed in the next five to six years. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that in 
consideration for the Deed referred to in the 
preceding vote, it authorize the Treasurer of 
the University to cause to be paid from the 
Residence Hall Trust Fund account to the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority 
the sum of Three Hundred Sixty-four Thousand 
(364,000.00) Dollars upon delivery of the 
said Deed. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 



(/BladysJ Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trusteed 



4919 



Exec. Comm. 
4-7-76 



4S20 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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ATTENDANCE 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

April 20, 1976; 9:30 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Clark, Rothenburger ; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Committee Members Absent: Trustees Breyer and Spiller 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Spielman, Dean of the School 
of Food and Natural Resources; Mr. Whaley, Head of the Department 
of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Smith, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 



The meeting was called to order at 9:50 by Chairman 
Rowland, who introduced Mr. Whaley, Head of the Department of 
Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at UM/Amherst, who 
has been recommended as Dean of the College of Food and Natural 
Resources. She then welcomed Dean Spielman, who had returned to 
continue his report on the University Field Stations. Chairman 
Rowland then asked Chancellor Bulger to report on Health Affairs 
Planning at UM/Worcester . 

Chancellor Bulger opened his remarks by stating how 
pleased he was to talk about long-range plans since his activities: 
to date had been mostly concerned with short-term problems. He 
said he would not speak about what ideally the UM/Worcester Medi- 
cal Center should do, but rather about what he feels is possible 
under current conditions. He said that health affairs planning 
must take into account 1) the importance of medical students hav- 
ing an opportunity to learn and to work with people in fields other 
than medicine, 2) operation of the hospital and its part in the 
medical education of the students, and 3) the relationships of 
the Medical Center to other campuses of the University and other 
institutions in the area. He said that starting in September 
there will be 304 medical students at the campus, not counting 
residents. It is time, he said, to begin working on training 
programs beyond the M.D. and including the numbers served in our 
student count. 



4921 



UM/Worcester — 
Health Affairs 
Planning 



4922 



LRP Comm. 
4/20/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bulger said that plans are under way for co- 
operative arrangements to bring together into one program the resiT 
dencies in internal medicine, surgery and other specialties at 
the different Worcester hospitals. He said that this year there 
are over 100 residents in University-affiliated programs in the 
Worcester area. Such cooperative programs could mean better medi- 
cal education for students as well as improved care for patients. 
In answer to a question from Trustee Rothenburger , Chancellor 
Bulger indicated that 55 to 60 percent of the residency positions 
in the teaching hospital will be in primary care. He noted that 
40 percent of the physicians in the country are involved in pri- 
mary care. 



Chancellor Bulger reviewed the range of possibilities 
for non-physician training programs. The teaching hospital, he 
noted, when fully occupied will have the capacity to give clini- 
cal training to from 300 to 400 nursing students. Chairman Row- 
land asked Chancellor Bulger if he was anticipating a degree or 
diploma type program. Mr. Lynton commented that the trend is 
away from issuing diplomas and toward giving baccalaureate de- 
grees. Chancellor Bulger said that in addition to linking UM/ 
Worcester programs to programs offered at UM/Amherst and UM/Bostom, 
there was the possibility of a consortium arrangement whereby 
students would do their non-clinical work at other University 
campuses or at other schools in the area. 



In the allied health area he mentioned current work 
with Quinsigamond Community College in the training of X-ray tech-f- 
nicians and with the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy in train- 
ing pharmacists. Among other non-physician programs that might 
be considered are bio-medical engineer, medical social work, nu- 
clear medicine and medical technology. He said these programs 
could be joint efforts with other institutions in the area, such 
as Clark University, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and the 
Worcester Foundation. 

Trustee Carlson said that the proposed reorganization 
of higher education in the Commonwealth may impact on long-range 
planning for the Medical Center. Chancellor Bromery suggested 
caution in planning cooperative programs to make sure that poten- 
tial students are aware of all the facts, such as which institu- 
tion will award the degree. Trustee Clark also urged caution 
that the University did not become too generous in cooperative 
agreements and that care was given to the income-expense ratio. 
Chancellor Bulger said he would strive to ensure that the hospital 
would become self-supporting. To this end, he said, it is nec- 
essary to separate instructional from operational costs. 

Mr. Lynton stressed the importance of setting priorities 
for the Medical Center, particularly since there are so many in- 
teresting and innovative programs which could go forward. Chan- 
cellor Bulger expressed the view that a larger enrollment than 
just medical students mav be necessary to justify the cost of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

facility. He stressed the important role the Medical Center can 
play in augmenting programs at UM/Amherst and at area hospitals 
and state agencies. He said that the services which the Medical 
Center provides will generate more support for the facility. 

Among other future possibilities, Chancellor Bulger 
said consideration should be given to the training of "physician 
extenders" — physician assistants and associates — as well as hos- 
pital administration, particularly the development of middle- 
management personnel. Mr. Lynton added that the position of 
physician associate is a new field open to men as well as women, 
whereas nursing has traditionally been considered an occupation 
for women. 

Discussion ensued on other related areas of medicine, 
including the fields of dentistry, optometry, osteopathy, podia- 
try and veterinary medicine. Chancellor Bulger said that the 
federal government is interested in the establishment of regional 
centers for some of these fields. He said that the treatment of 
pain is an important area of current study and concern. The Uni- 
versity of Washington has already developed a very successful 
pain clinic and plans are currently under way for the establish- 
ment of a pain clinic at UM/Worcester , which is expected to be 
in operation in the very near future. 

Trustee Carlson said that he found the ideas presented 
very encouraging, but felt that the current economic climate in 
the state was such that any proposed expansion of the UM/Worceste:: 
Medical Center would not be well received. Mr. Callahan commented 
that, although he agreed that this was not a time for increased 
activity, he saw no reason why the Medical Center personnel shoul| 
not be considering how best to use the money it already has. 

In concluding, Chancellor Bulger said that continuing 
education should be a major activity of the campus. The campus, 
he said, could also carry on this type of program by sending 
faculty from the Medical School into the various communities to 
meet with practicing physicians and, hopefully, to develop "learn- 
ing communities" around certain local hospitals. 

Chairman Rowland thanked Chancellor Bulger for his re- 
port and asked him to keep the Committee up to date on campus 
thinking with regard to long-range plans for the Medical Center. 

Chairman Rowland next turned to the matter of the Uni- 
versity's field stations and asked Dean Spielman to continue his 
review of current programs and operations, which had had to be 
interrupted at the last meeting due to lack of time. 

Dean Spielman distributed additional data on the state 
funds, activities and staffing of the various stations. He indi- 
cated that the program directions mentioned were primarily his 
personal thoughts. 



4923 



LRP Comm, 
4/20/76 



University Field 
Stations 



4S24 



LRP Comm. 
4/20/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He then reported further on the Cranberry Experiment 
Station at East Wareham, suggesting that it had additional capa- 
city and could be used as a research and development faciltiy on 
water quality, land use and other environmental matters for the 
region. 

Various suggestions were made about additional financial 
support for the activities at the field stations, such as user 
charges for direct services and support from the industry as well 
as from federal and state governmental agencies. Chairman Row- 
land emphasized the value and importance of the services per- 
formed. 

Mr. Callahan asked if the University provided a list of 
the agencies to which people can turn for help in addition to the 
University field stations, such as the county extension services. 
Dean Spielman replied that a comprehensive listing was not pub- 
lished by the University but that it did publish a directory of 
all federal programs. Mr. Carlson asked how much support was 
provided to the Cranberry Station by the cranberry industry. 
Dean Spielman replied that the University received between 
$10,000 and $20,000 per year. 

At the conclusion of Dean Spielman T s report, Chairman 
Rowland asked Chancellor Golino to report on the Nantucket Field 
Station. Chancellor Golino gave a report summarizing the origin, 
facilities and present program of the station. Since assuming 
administrative responsibility in 1976, UM/Boston has initiated 
repairs and renovations at the station so that it can now be used 
on a year-round basis for biological research and education and 
public service programs. The field station staff serve as con- 
sultants to a number of Nantucket agencies and organizations, in- 
cluding the school system and the public health office. This 
year the campus, with the aid of grants, has sponsored a humani- 
ties program on the island which stresses the role of the human- 
istic disciplines in understanding the unique heritage of Nantuc- 
ket. Chancellor Golino concluded by indicating that a compre- 
hensive report on the station would be available in the fall. 

Chairman Rowland then asked Chancellor Bromery to re- 
view the history of the Gloucester Marine Station. Chancellor 
Bromery said that this station had been established as the result 
of the interest of a particular researcher in marine biology, who 
successfully secured a state capital appropriation to purchase 
the land and improve the facilities. He has now left the Univer- 
sity. The improvements are expected to go forward so as to pro- 
vide general purpose instructional, office and research space. 
Responsibility for administration of the station has recently 
been assigned to the College of Food and Natural Resources. 

President Wood suggested that the Committee should con- 
sider the adequacy of the stations in relation to multicampus 
use and continuing education programs. He said he believes that 



I 



Nantucket Field 
Station 



I 



Gloucester Marine 
Station 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

some analytical papers could be provided by the Planning Office 
which would be helpful. When the continuing education report is 
in, he said, trade-offs could be considered. He noted that the 
Gloucester Station was an example of the effective entrepreneur- 
ship of a single individual but in terms of investment, at a time 
when there is no money for repairs to dormitories at UM/Amherst 
or for landscaping at UM/Worcester , questions were legitimate. 
He raised the possibility of the station evolving as a "mini- 
campus. " 

Dean Spielman said that field stations are successful 
to the extent that they relate to organized industrial or com- 
mercial groups. He said he sees Gloucester as a station which 
could relate to the fishing industry and to experiments which are 
being conducted by the University of Rhode Island in the fields 
of aquaculture and marine biology. He added that Maine and New 
Hampshire had recently received sea grant contracts. Trustee 
Clark asked if recent legislation extending the shore rights to 
200 miles would affect the work at the Gloucester station. Trust- 
ee Carlson suggested that the proposed construction program at 
the station should be examined in terms of the long-range plans 
for the facility. Chancellor Golino added that UM/Boston is very 
much interested in the Gloucester facility and he hoped the Bos- 
ton campus could play an important role in planning for its future 

At the request of Chairman Rowland, Mr. Whaley commentec. 
on the discussion. He said he did not wish to speculate about 
the future of the facility, but as a means of gaining visibility 
for the University, it had the characteristic of being a coastal 
facility in a coastal state with a small land area. He thought 
such a facility could be used for solving problems which were 
unique to Massachusetts. He mentioned the growing concern with 
coastal zone management. President Wood added that the use of 
the coastal islands was another related matter of concern. 
Chancellor Bromery mentioned the work being done at Woods Hole 
and in Rhode Island related to land-water interface. He said the 
University has the expertise for such research but has no state 
or federal funding. 

Trustee Carlson said a policy is needed with regard to 
the University's field and research stations. President Wood 
added that a planning paper enumerating the options and the trade- 
offs would be helpful. He said the Committee also should con- 
sider ways in which to make more effective use of the various 
facilities . 

It was agreed that the Committee would renew its dis- 
cussion of these stations when additional information and analy- 
sis would be available in the fall. The meeting adjourned at 
12:00 noon. 



4S2i 



LRP Comm, 
4/20/76 




Cm. 



li ~~ J ir 



eith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4926 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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ATTENDANCE : 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

April 20, 1976; 1:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson, President Wood; 
Trustees Croce, Gordon, Rothenburger , Rowland, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson; Secretary Hardy; Ms. Judd, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Dennis and Shearer 

Other Trustees : Trustee Cronin 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cooley, Assistant 
Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Direc- 
tor; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Vice Chancellor Gage; Mr. 
Beatty, Budget Office; Mr. Dent, Director of Financial Aid 

UM/ Bo st on : Ms. Brennen, Director of Financial Aid; Mr. Drink- 
water, Controller; Mr. McNeil, Physical Plant; Mr. Spaulding, 
Director of Physical Plant 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Professor Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean for Administrative 
Affairs and Hospital Director 

Guests : Mr. Cook, Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland; Ms. 
Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. Martus, Co- 
President, Student Senate, UM/ Amherst; Ms. Guttenberg, Speaker, 
Student Senate, UM/Amherst; Mr. Federow, Graduate Student Senate, 
UM/ Amherst 



The meeting was called to order at 1:40 p.m. The 
first item for discussion was the Need-based Tuition Waiver Pol - 
icy (Doc. T76-071) on which Chairman Carlson asked President Wood 
to comment. President Wood reviewed the situation which led to 



4927 



formulation of the policy to be discussed at today's meeting 
prior to discussion by the Executive Committee. He said that 
the proposed waivers would be directed not towards those students 
in greatest need, but towards those who have undertaken reason- 
able levels of self-help assistance and those slightly below 
middle range of the student income profile. He asked Mrs. Hanson 
to review the policy in greater detail. 



Need-based Tu- 
ition Waiver 
Policy 
(Doc. T76-071) 



4928 



B&F Comm. 
4-20-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Hanson began by introducing the financial aid 
officers of the Amherst and Boston campuses, Mr. Richard Dent 
and Ms. Lana Brennen respectively. She reiterated a point made 
by President Wood that the policy had been reviewed by committees 
on all campuses and by the Multi-Campus Budget Committee. The 
program, she said, is proposed as a one-year trial in order to 
see its effects in practice and because of anticipated changes 
at the Federal level where programs of financial assistance, 
from which the University receives 85 percent of its aid monies, 
are now under review. It was felt that the formulation of a 
long-term program should await the Congressional review and its 
results. It is expected that the Trustees will be asked to 
review a revised tuition waiver program early next year. That 
revision will incorporate the results of the application of need- 
based tuition waivers and include a review of all of the tuition 
waiver policies now in force. 

She said the recommendation is that a value of not 
more than $250,000 in tuition waivers be granted in academic 
year 1976-77. This amount was determined on the basis of the 
best information available as to students who would need aid 
which could be met with waivers. It is estimated that approxi- 
mately 1000 to 1300 students will be requesting this type of 
aid. A financial aid package will be put together for each 
student who qualifies for assistance. Generally, such a package 
will first draw on the maximum amount of Federal and state aid 
available, scholarships, and a component of self-help through 
work; if there still is financial need after these resources 
have been explored, the University will try to meet that need 
through a tuition waiver. 

Chairman Carlson pointed out that, upon favorable 
action by the Executive Committee on this tuition waiver policy, 
the first year tuition increase as outlined in the vote taken 
in December 1975 would be activated. In another year, the 
availability of Federal funds would be reviewed. 

It was pointed out that the Legislature has eliminated 
the option of tuition waivers for out-of-state and foreign stu- 
dents. In reply to a question from Trustee Troy on how this 
would affect the number of out-of-state applicants, Mr. Dent 
said that probably fewer people would apply, particularly those 
in the low income level who are eligible only for Federal aid. 
Overall, he said, there may be a switch in the mix of out-of- 
state students to include those who are more affluent. Foreign 
students are not eligible for any state or Federal funds; this 
is the group most affected by the tuition increase and it is 
unfortunate that they may not be granted tuition waivers. Since 
the Legislature, as Mr. Lynton pointed out, is not sympathetic 
to the plight of undergraduate foreign students, the University 
is contacting their governments in hopes that assistance might 
be provided by them. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Martus then brought up the subject of student 
resource surveys through which the University formulates statis- 
tics about the student population. Since the response to the 
recent survey had been minimal, the Student Government Associa- 
tion has asked that a secondary survey be done. That request 
has not been met, and he therefore questioned the basis of the 
$250,000 tuition waiver funding without statistics from a more 
comprehensive survey. 

Mrs. Hanson replied that the figure was arrived at by 
estimating the number of students who would come forth on the 
basis of currently available data. She indicated that another 
survey is planned in the coming academic year. The relative 
paucity of responses could be a reflection of student interest 
in the matter. Mr. Dent pointed out that of a 42,000 survey 
distribution, returns to date are about 5,000. Trustee Cronin 
said that the survey itself was a long and complicated one and 
that perhaps students did not realize its aim. Chancellor 
Bromery added that this data was not the only instrument used 
for estimating the need for tuition waivers, but that extensive 
experience in financial aid matters played an important part. 

Mr. Lynton corrected Mr. Martus' s statement that the 
policy was aimed at a specific income group by saying that it 
is aimed at all students who have unmet needs. The estimate, 
because of various Federal scholarship policies, is that the 
group will be primarily middle income students, but it is not 
a policy which starts with theories of income distribution. 

Mr. Martus said that since student data would become 
more important as the gradual tuition increases were implemented 
in the coming fiscal years, he and Trustee Cronin would endeavor 
to publicize through area governments on the campus the need 
for more thorough population data. The Committee agreed that 
this would be most helpful. 

Mr. Federow raised the question of whether Teaching 
Assistant and Research Assistant tuition waivers (compensation 
for services) would remain at the same level. Mrs. Hanson replied 
that the present document did not intend to abrogate any policies 
contained in last year's document. The only provisions which 
are different are those which were specifically legislatively 
prohibited. The document under discussion does not involve the 
issue of non-need-based tuition waivers. 

A resolution was suggested by Mr. Martus to undertake 
an intensive review of the entire financial aid program; if 
resultant data indicated significant shortcomings in the aid 
programs, there would be no further tuition increases beyond 
the spring 1977 levels. Chairman Carlson pointed out that a 
commitment to review the policy was clearly stated in President 
Wood's April 14, 1976 memorandum and was implicit in the Board's 



4829 



B&F Comm. 
4-20-76 



4930 



B&F Comm. 
4-20-76 



UM/ Amherst, 
UM/Boston, 
UM/Worcester — 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T76-072) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

December vote. He stated his reluctance to recommend to the 
Executive Committee and the Board a resolution which modifies 
that vote. 

Dr. Smith of the Worcester campus said that the Medical 
School was happy to be included in the tuition waiver package 
and pointed out a correction to the document in that the Health 
Profession Scholarship program has been terminated. The only 
money available to medical students from the Federal government 
is in the form of loans. 

This concluded discussion of the Need-based Tuition 
Waiver Policy, and the Committee then turned to the matter of 
Fund Transfers for the three campuses (Doc. T76-072) . Chancellor 
Bromery reported for the Amherst campus, saying that the only 
transfer during the past year had been in the 15 account due to 
lack of an appropriation for equipment. The present major trans- 
fer is from the 13 account for educational supplies (purchases 
have been held back and projected into the next fiscal year) to 
the 01 and 03 accounts. Money has been transferred into the 15 
account although the figure still remains light considering the 
size of the Amherst campus. The transfer into the 14 account 
is due principally to telephone rate increases; likewise, funds 
have been transferred into the 12 account (maintenance) to meet 
the increased cost of maintenance contracts, supplies, and 
expenses . 

Mr. Lynton told the Committee that the University is 
moving toward a major crisis in equipment. For example, the 
single greatest problem in the School of Engineering is its 
obsolescence of equipment. Chancellor Bromery said that this 
and the renovation of the dormitories would be the two major 
problems for the future. Trustee Croce suggested looking into 
equipment rentals ; Chancellor Bromery said that this was done 
where possible, but some equipment has to be purchased outright 
and then has to be updated. He noted further the inadequate 
level of appropriated funds for equipment maintenance contracts. 



Mr. Drinkwater, Controller of the Boston campus, said 
that its transfers were focused on energy savings. Through a 
substantial conservation effort, savings in the utility account 
(08) will be transferred into the maintenance account (12) to 
modify existing control systems and into the equipment account (15) 



For the Worcester campus, Mr. Cathey said that the 
transfer into the 03 account was primarily to finance the Family 
Practice Program. The transfer into account 07 for medical and 
surgical supplies is part of a build-up of inventories and 
patient care expenses. As with the Amherst campus, money has 
been transferred into the 14 account because of increased tele- 
phone and postage rates. The equipment transfer encompasses 
items for the Family Practice Program and for audio-visual needs. 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Hanson pointed out that there is now pending in 
the Legislature a rescission bill to take back from the Worcester 
campus $1.3 million in order to help cover the Commonwealth's 
$100 million deficit in other areas. 

A motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

the fund transfers as set forth in Trustee Document 
T76-072. 

The Committee then turned to the New Fees and Fee 
Changes, Amherst Campus (Doc. T76-073) . After brief discussion 
of each item, motions were made, seconded, and it was 



4931 



B&F Comm. 
4-20-76 



VOTED 



1 



VOTED 



I 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees the establish- 
ment of a summer room reservation fee of $100 per 
room, effective July 1, 1976, for the following 
purposes and on the following conditions : 

(1) To permit students to designate their rooms 
not to be used for summer recess activity, 
and to use said rooms for storage of furniture 
or personal belongings. 

(2) That such permit be granted at the discretion 
of the Director of Residential Life. 

(3) That the student must have reserved said 
residence hall space for the following term. 

(4) That this permit does not allow personal 
occupancy of the room by the student during 
the summer recess. 

(5) That each student must have executed a waiver 
of any claim against the University for damage 
to or theft of any property stored in said 
student's room. 

That, effective September 1, 1976 the General 
Extension Trust Fund, the General Summer Trust 
Fund, and the General Conference Trust Fund be 
and hereby are established with the following 
fee structure: 

Schedule of Continuing Education Fees 



UM/ Amherst — 
New Fees and 
Fee Changes 
(Doc. T76-073) 



Description 



Fee Fund 



Fees for Service: 



4932 



B&F Comm, 
4-20-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Application/Matriculation $15 

Fee for processing applications for 
degree matriculation or certificate 
application programs. 

Change of Program $ 2 

Processing add/drop requests 



Deferred Payment 

Fee for processing deferred payment 
requests and to discourage unnecessary 
deferred payment requests. 



Recording $15 

Fee for maintaining and updating 
a student's records. This fee is 
applied when the student does not 
pay a program fee. 

Registration $ 5 

Fee to cover administrative and 
clerical costs of registration. 

Late Registration $ 5 

Fee is in addition to the regular 
registration fee and covers the 
additional costs of late regis- 
tration. 

Transcript $ 1 

Fee charged the second and each 
additional transcript copy. 

File Reproduction $ 2 

Fee for each reproduction of a stu- 
dent's file or a portion thereof. 
If this includes a transcript, a 
transcript charge will be assessed 
as above. 

Fees for Programs ; 

Day Enrollments $35 

Per credit hour fee for part-time 
and non-matriculated undergraduate 
students in underenrolled day 
courses. A portion of this fee equal 
to the regular session fee per credit 
hour is remitted to the Commonwealth. 



Extension 



Extension 



$ 5 Extension 



Extension, 
Conference 



I 



Extension, 
Conference 



Extension, 
Conference 



Extension, 
Conference 



Extension, 
Conference 



I 



Extension 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Description 



Fee 



$35 



$57.50 



Evening College 

Per credit hour fee for courses 
offered through the Evening College 
of the Division. 

Special Programs 

Per credit hour fee for those pro- 
grams designed to meet the needs of 
a relatively small group of students. 

Non-Degree Graduate Enrollment 
Per enrollment fee for non-degree 
students enrolled in graduate level 
University courses. 



Workshop, Conference By contract 

Programs arranged to meet the needs 
of various segments of the community. 
Fees range between $20 and $75. 



Fund 



Extension 



Extension 



$30 



Extension 



Extension, 
Conference 



Summer Session, undergraduate 
Fee charged to cover the direct 
instructional costs for under- 
graduate courses in the summer 
session. 

Summer Session, graduate 
Fee charged to cover the direct 
instructional costs for graduate 
courses in the summer session. 



$25 



Summer 



$40 



Summer 



VOTED 



VOTED 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976, the fees for students 
involved in the various foreign programs be 
and hereby are established as follows: 

Summer in Portugal $ 350* 

Oxford Summer 1,100 

Freiburg Summer 1,000 

Panama Tropical Zoology 150* 

Summer in Japan 75* 

Freiburg Year 350* 

*Does not include room, board, or travel. 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976 a fee of $10 be es- 
tablished for the Foreign Programs Adminis- 
trative Trust. 



4933 



B&F Comm. 
4-20-76 



4934 



B&F Comm. 
4-20-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976, a Student Dependent 
Health Fee be established at a cost of $110 
per year and $35 for the summer. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Valley Health Plan Trust Fund be, and 
hereby is, established. The revenue for 
this trust will be generated from the 
participants of the Valley Health Plan. 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following schedule of fees for child 
care services on the Amherst campus shall 
be in effect beginning July 1, 1976. All 
fees are on a per semester basis. 



University Laboratory School 



■ 



University Day School 



New World Day School 
North Village Day School 



$70 for two 2-hour sessions per 

week 

$110 for three 2 1/2-hour sessions 

per week 

$140 for four 2 1/2-hour sessions 

per week 

$160 for five 1/2-day sessions per 

week 

$320 for five full-day sessions 

per week 

Co-op fee remains same. 

$135 for five 3 1/2-hour afternoons 

per week 

$160 for five 4-hour mornings per 

week 

$155 for five 4-hour sessions per 
week (full fee) 

$125 for five 4-hour sessions per 
week (co-op) 

$210 for five 8-hour sessions per 

week (co-op) 

$245 for five 8-hour sessions per 

week (full fee) 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees establishment 
of a per diem rate of $3.50 to be charged for summer 
day care services, effective July 1, 1976. 



Grass Roots 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

if approved by the Building Authority, effec- 
tive September 1, 1976, the new rate for 
dormitory room telephone charges in all 
Building Authority dormitories shall be 
$23.50 per semester, or $47 per year. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the new rate for dormitory room telephone 
charges in all dormitories of the Residence 
Hall Trust Fund be $23.50 per semester, or 
$47 per year. These new rates shall be 
effective September 1, 1976. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976, the Credentialing 
Trust Fund be and hereby is established with 
a fee schedule of: 

A. $2 per credential set mailed (undergraduate) 

B. $3 per credential set mailed (graduate & alumni) 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976, the Transcript Trust 
Fund be and hereby is established with a fee 
of $2.50 per transcript request. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976, the Geology Micro- 
probe Trust Fund be, and hereby is, estab- 
lished with a fee of $15/hour. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

effective July 1, 1976, the following schedule 
of rates be and hereby is established for the 
Campus Center Accommodation Services. 



Fee Schedule 



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Twin Bed Rooms (112 rooms) 
Single Occupancy 
Double Occupancy 

One Room Suites (2) 

Single or Double Occupancy 

Two Room Suites (2) 

Single Occupancy 

Double Occupancy 
Student Rates (as available basis) 



Current Rate 



$15.00 
$20.00 



$24.00 



$30.00 
$35.00 
$10.75 



Proposed Rate 



$16.00 
$22.00 



$24.00 



$30.00 
$35.00 
$11.75 



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4-20-76 



Fidelity Bond 
Renewal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Group reservations of 10 rooms or more may receive a minimum 
rate of $10 per room single occupancy or $15 per room double 
occupancy. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1976, the fee for students 
participating in the Horseback Riding program 
be and hereby is established at $50 per semester. 

The Late Registration Fee Trust Fund vote was deferred pending 
further review by Counsel. 

With regard to the summer room reservation fee, Ms. 
Guttenberg and Trustee Cronin said that security conditions in 
the dormitories were not optimal and expressed their desire for 
better patrolling to safeguard students' belongings. Chancellor 
Bromery said that it was easier to secure the dormitories in 
the summer when they were closed rather than when there is 
partial access. The campus hopes to be able to store furniture 
in one or two residence halls and thereby maximize security. 

Treasurer Johnson then introduced Mr. Paul Cook of the 
Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland for a presentation with 
regard to renewal of the University's Fidelity Bond. This bond 
covers all employees of the University under a $250,000 Blanket 
Crime Policy. Mr. Cook recommended increasing coverage to 
$500,000 at a cost of an additional $486 per year. He further 
recommended first dollar coverage rather than a deductible since 
the University's fiscal system is based on trust funds which 
function on a self-supporting basis. The resultant higher pre- 
mium is off-set by operational considerations. He added that 
his company rates the University administration as first class. 
However, an accumulation of small losses can erode the premium 
base despite excellent management. In order to pay for first 
dollar losses and to reflect the University's growth, the 
renewal premium is substantially higher. One way in which to 
reduce costs, he said, is to consider a reduction in cash ex- 
posures; if this can be done, the company will re-rate that 
section pertaining to cash exposure (although premiums are 
usually frozen for a three-year period) , and thereby reduce the 
annual premium and revise the annual installment premium. For 
example, having a bank at the Campus Center would have a major 
impact in reducing cash exposure and thereby substantially 
benefit the University's premium rates. Chairman Carlson said 
that it was the sense of the Committee that anything which could 
be done to reduce the cash exposures should be explored. Both 
he and Treasurer Johnson concurred with the recommendation for 
higher coverage. Mr. Cook completed his report with a brief 
discussion of pending claims. 

Treasurer Johnson then informed the Committee that the 
Executive Committee of the University of Massachusetts Foundation 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

is recommending to its directors at its May meeting the estab- 
lishment of deferred giving programs for the University including 
annuity programs, unitrust programs, and pooled income plans. 
All of the legal work has been accomplished on these including 
clearance from the IRS and the Securities and Exchange Commission 
They will be offered immediately through a marketing program by 
the Associate Alumni Office at UM/ Amherst. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 3:10 p.m. 



Gladys flkeith Hardy ' 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

April 21, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shaler; President Wood; 
Trustees Eddy, Cronin and Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau 
and Ok in 

Other Trustees : Trustee Rothenburger 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice 
President for Analytical Studies; Ms. Gill, Staff Assistant to 
the President; Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant for Student Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery ; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 



UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs , Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Ms. Brennen, Director of Financial Aid 



UM/Worcester : Dr. Hays, Professor of Community and Family Medicine 

Guest : Margaret Zirker, UM/Boston student 

The meeting was convened at 10:10 a.m. Chairman Shaler 
recognized President Wood to open discussion of the first agenda 
item, the proposed reaffirmation of the 1973 Codes of Student 
Conduct at UM/Amherst (Doc. T73-005) and UM/Boston (Doc. T73-006) 
The President sketched the history of the codes and the reasons 
for them. He stressed that the campuses had been in the process 
of developing new codes for a considerable length of time, well 
before the December and April meetings of the Board. Beyond this 
the President said he felt strongly that a re-examination of the 
student affairs capability of the campuses as a whole was in orde 
He noted that the accreditation team which had recently completed 
its visit to the Medical School had called for an upgrading of 
the student affairs capability of the School, and he mentioned 
also the emphasis of the merger debate on student support service^ 
at UM/Boston. He continued that student Trustees had expressed 
concerns about student feelings of being disregarded and excluded 
from the governance process, and during a meeting with them he ha<jl 
stressed the need for the students to make a concerted effort to 
use the governance process rather than to address the Trustees 
directly on issues that concern them. 



UM/Amherst, 
UM/Boston — 
Codes of 
Student 
Conduct (Docs 
T73-005, 
T73-006) 



4940 



Stu. Affairs 

Mime 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This reaffirmation of the student codes would serve to 
accelerate the reactivation of governance concerns, and would re- 
invigorate the review committees which allow the Chancellors to 
make decisions about individual cases and to assure appropriate 
standards and forms of conduct. The President also asked whether 
it is desirable to have two separate codes of conduct rather than 
a University-wide code. 

Chairman Shaler expressed his understanding that the re-p 
affirmation of these codes would be necessary even had not the 
recent events happened. He then recognized Chancellor Bromery. 
The Chancellor explained that in 1973 or 1974 the Undergraduate 
Student Senate had devised a revision to the 1966 Code of Conduct 
(which had been revised in 1972) , substantially changing the picket- 
ing provisions. The Faculty Senate had challenged the new provi- 
sions because they had included the right to picket in the facultV 
office corridors and in classrooms. He had agreed with this anal- 
ysis and had charged the students and faculty to get together to 
try to work out their differences. But nothing had been accom- 
plished. 

Therefore, the Chancellor said, when the time came to 
make a decision on the Student Code of Conduct, he had concluded 
that the best thing to do would be to reaffirm the old code until 
such time as a new code can be developed which is acceptable to 
all parties. He believed that this would be difficult, however, 
since he understood the students and faculty to be farther apart 
than ever. 



Chairman Shaler asked whether he had heard correctly 
that the Student Matters Committee of the Student Senate had been 
abolished. Trustee Cronin explained that a controversial process 
of internal reorganization had taken place within the Senate dur- 
ing the fall. As part of the process, several Committees had been 
in limbo, but continued to operate without a formal charge. The 
Chairman strongly urged that the Senate put its house in order anp. 
reconstitute these Committees. The students were constantly call- 
ing for more student consultation in University policy decisions 
he said, but this was difficult to accomplish with the student 
governance structure in disarray. 



President Wood again asked for comment on the relative 
advantages of one code versus three. Dr. Gage strongly opposed 
a universal code, since the three campuses were so different from 
one another. Counsel Searson pointed out that the University was 
a single institution, and he thought it preferable to have a single 
code with sections applicable to certain campuses. Chairman Sha-j 
ler ventured a guess that the two codes were identical in most 
respects, anyway. Mr. Lynton suggested that a multicampus commit- 
tee, consisting of the student affairs committees of each student 
body, could attempt to reconcile any inconsistencies between the 
codes . 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm 

and adopt the Code of Student Conduct, UM/Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T73-005; Motor Vehicle Rules 
and Regulations, UM/Amherst, as set forth in Doc. 
T75-155; and Rules and Regulations Relative to the 
Possession, Consumption and Sale of Alcoholic Bev- 
erages, UM/Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T74-081A. 

Turning to the Boston code, the Chairman called on Chan- 
cellor Golino, who reported that a revision of the present code 
of conduct was in process. The campus Student Affairs Committee 
had approved a new code yesterday, and it will be considered next 
by the University Assembly. Chairman Shaler noted that the present 
code had been adopted before the position of Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs had been created, and that therefore the adminis- 
tration of the code had rested with the Chancellor. He said he 
assumed that its administration would now be delegated to the Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs. 

A long discussion ensued about the problems and disad- 
vantages of the UM/Boston governance system. Trustee Rothenburger 
wondered whether a separate student senate might be preferable, 
but then conceded that students' concerns might not be as effec- 
tively articulated as in a unicameral body. The Chancellor said 
the Assembly was not "a paragon of effectiveness," and said that 
some items had languished in the Assembly for more than a year. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm 
and adopt the Code of Student Conduct, UM/Boston, 
as set forth in Doc. T73-006; Motor Vehicle Rules, 
Regulations, and Traffic Signs, UM/Boston, as set 
forth in Doc. T74-045A; and Policies and Procedures 
Relative to the Consumption and Sale of Alcoholic 
Beverages, UM/Boston as set forth in Doc. T75-015A. 

The Committee expressed the sense of the meeting as 
follows: that the reaffirmation of these codes was an interim 
measure to be supplanted by new codes currently pending on the 
campuses. 

Dr. Hays was asked for his comments, and he said that, 
although there had never been problems with student conduct at th£ 
Medical School, it was clear that the campus should move in the 
direction of developing such a code. Chairman Shaler remarked 
that he was generally uninformed as to the ways in which student 
consensus is reached at the Worcester campus, and he asked that 
the Committee be given a report sometime in the fall about the 
process by which students' views are ascertained for purposes of 
governance. 



4941 



Stu. Affairs 
4/21/76 



4942 



Stu. Affairs 
4/21/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee turned next to discussion of the proposed 
Need-Based Tuition Waiver Policy (Doc. T76-071) . It was pointed 
out that the proposal had been discussed by the Committee on Budget 
and Finance for its fiscal implications, and would here be review- 
ed for its student affairs implications. The Executive Committee 
would make the final recommendation to the Board of Trustees. 

Vice President Lynton introduced the proposal, reminding 
the Committee that when the Board had voted a phased tuition in- 
crease in December, it had made the vote conditional on a finan- 
cial aid plan which would ensure that no student be denied access 
to the University because of the increase in tuition. The proposal 
before the Committee would set up a pool of tuition waivers which 
would be used as scholarships. He described this as the most 
flexible system which could be devised. The students would apply 
to the financial aid office, have their unmet need determined, 
and tuition waivers would then be allocated. 

It was believed that a pool of about $250,000 would be 
adequate to reduce unmet need to manageable proportions or to zero. 
He said that it was likely that those deriving the greatest bene-| 
fit from the proposal were not the lower-income bracket, which 
would be served by federal financial aid, but that group just above 
the lower-income bracket which would have insufficient resources. 
Mr. Lynton concluded by pointing out that the future of federal 
policy with regard to financial aid is uncertain. Therefore it 
was recommended that the Board adopt this tuition waiver policy 
on a one-year basis. 

Chairman Shaler recalled that there had been emphatic 
assurances at the December meeting which had raised tuition that 
federal financial aid would be available in large quantity. Now 
it seemed, he said, that the federal picture was much cloudier 
than was stated at the time. Mr. Lynton replied that the picture 
was not cloudy for 1976-77; it was the following and subsequent 
years that were in doubt. Mr. Cooley added that the University 
expects to receive $1.2 million more in federal funds this year, 
but that the law expires in June, 1977. This is why the one-year 
term of the proposal is recommended. 



Chairman Shaler recalled that the Trustees had tightened 
up the tuition waiver policy in 1975 because it was felt that the 
Legislature might be critical of the looseness with which waivers 
had sometimes been granted. The Trustees had then raised tuition, 
also to keep the Legislature happy, but now it was being proposed 
that the tuition waivers be more generously granted. How would 
the Legislature view this change? 

Vice President Lynton said tuition waivers had never 
before been granted as financial aid, but primarily as compensa- 
tion for service, such as teaching assistantships . Chancellor 
Bromery said he was certain the Legislature would have no quarrel 
with granting tuition waivers to persons genuinely in need. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Callahan said that whatever you chose to call it, 
this was, in fact, an expanded scholarship program using pooled 
financial aid resources. 

Trustee Rothenburger said there was a problem on the 
Boston campus of getting information to students not eligible for 
federal financial aid. He said the campus newspaper and radio 
station were not adequate conduits of information, and he hoped 
there could be some kind of commitment to an effort to reach thes£ 
students, and to supplement the staff in the financial aid office 

Vice President Lynton pointed out that this was not a 
new financial aid program, but an additional resource for the 
financial aid office to use. A student with an unmet need would 
still go to the financial aid office to see what help he or she 
could receive, and it would be for the office to assess the sit- 
uation and make a determination as to whether a tuition waiver 
would be appropriate. 

Ms. Brennen observed that 90 percent of the Student 
Resource Survey form which had been mailed to 7,800 UM/Boston 
students to help determine their unmet need had not been returned 
She suggested that perhaps a letter from the President would help 
bring the availability of resources to the attention of students. 

Trustee Cronin said that the SRS form had been distri- 
buted without explanation at UM/Amherst, and students did not knojr 
what it was for. This was why there had been such a low return 
on the mailing. He pledged the Student Government Association to 
lend its assistance to any effort to conduct another survey, with 
a better explanation of its purposes. 

Dr. Gage agreed with the needs expressed, but said it 
was the responsibility of the campuses to administer the surveys 
and the financial aid policies. If the campuses need the help of 
the President, he said, then they should ask for it, but he felt 
that it was unwise for the President's office or the Board of 
Trustees to get involved at this stage. 

Mr. Cooley remarked that it was expected that the fed- 
eral government would provide, in addition to increased aid, in- 
creased resources to administer it. Dr. Gage said he hoped that 
the President would communicate to the Legislature the adminis- 
trative pinch involved in administering these funds. The amount 
allocated for this purpose was pitifully inadequate. Chairman 
Shaler said he assumed that it was the consensus of this Committed 
that the Executive Committee would be asked for help in this re- 
gard. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit^ 
tee, and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 11:15 a.m. 



KiladyJ Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustee 



^O 



Stu. Affairs 
4/21/76 



4944 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

April 21, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 
Trustees Burack, Clark, Eddy, Winthrop ; Secretary Hardy; Miss 
Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Abrams, Dennis and Shearer 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Post, Assistant 
Vice President for Physical Planning 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Littlefield, Director of 
Planning 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Director of Planning 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Grieg, Director of the Physical Plant 

Guest: Ms. Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 11:15 by Chairman 
Spiller. He referred briefly to the interference with the 
Trustees' April meeting at UM/Amherst, and the Committee's build- 
ing inspection tour which had been scheduled that day. He sug- 
gested that the tour not be rescheduled until after the end of 
classes — if then. 

Chairman Spiller then turned to the first agenda item, 
the John F. Kennedy Library land transfer, asking President Wood 
to comment. President Wood said that Senator Kennedy had issued 
a statement to the effect that the land breaking for the Library 
would take place on May 29, the birth date of the late President 
Kennedy. He said that in addition to the transfer of the land 
by the Commonwealth to the Library Corporation, the Corporation 
has to resolve the disposition of the Cambridge site. A decision 
must be made, he said, whether to have a simple land transfer 
or to incorporate both matters into one piece of legislation. 
He said that Senator Kennedy had indicated he would like the 
May 29 ceremony to be a community gathering. Chancellor Golino 
stated that the community, both Columbia Point and Dorchester 
residents, are eager to sponsor this celebration. 

Mrs. Robinson said that the Kennedy family, the Library 
Corporation directors and the architects have now settled on a 
site in the northeast corner of the UM/Boston property. The land 



4945 



UM/Boston — 
John F. Kennedy 
Library 



4946 



B&G Comm. 
4-21-76 



State Archives 
Proposal 



Pumphouse 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

parcel to be transferred consists of 9.5 acres above the high 
water mark and possibly three acres of tidal flats. Access to 
the Library will be via campus accesss roads with necessary 
modifications. The land for the Library will be transferred 
to the General Services Administration, under a legislative 
statute "authorizing and directing" the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity to make the conveyance. Mrs. Robinson said it is hoped 
that the actual transfer can be made either before or at the 
time of the ceremony. There being no further discussion, on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of a special 
act of the Legislature (enacted or pending) , 
to recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the President of the University to 
execute a deed and such other documents as may 
be necessary to effectuate a conveyance of the 
parcel of land at the Harbor Campus described 
in the Act to the United States of America to 
provide a site for the presidential archival 
depository of the John Fitzgerald Kennedy 
Library. 

President Wood said that Secretary of State Guzzi has 
moved forward with plans for building the State Archives at UM/ 
Boston, but that the scarcity of money is a problem. Mrs. 
Robinson added that the Boston Redevelopment Authority is working 
with the Archives Building Commission and that a brochure has 
been published, copies of which she distributed to the Committee. 
She said that the site and design shown in the brochure is 
simply a preliminary concept and that the final site would still 
have to be determined in relationship to the new site for the 
Kennedy Library. Trustee Burack suggested that the Archives 
should be located as near to the campus as feasible for the 
convenience of students and faculty who will use the facility. 

With regard to other developments at Columbia Point, 
Mrs. Robinson said that the architect for the Boston Housing 
Authority had selected an $8 million modernization project. He 
will prepare plans for a prototype building and then estimates 
will be prepared on how many buildings will be included . Chan- 
cellor Golino commented that the isolation of the current housing 
project residents has contributed to the untenable conditions 
there. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Chancellor Golino 
brought the Committee up to date on the proposal for renovating 
the "Pumphouse" — more formally the Calf Pasture Pumping Station — 
as a facility for combined University/Community use. The build- 
ing, he said, has historic interest and would complement the 
Kennedy Library and the State Archives as well as the UM/Boston 
campus. The campus, he said, is presently looking for ways to 
fund renovations to the building, indicating that the work would 
probably have to be privately funded. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Spiller next asked for a brief report on the 
proposed busway. Mrs. Robinson informed the Committee that Mr. 
Post and Mr. Meehan had been working with the Department of 
Public Works on a proposal by the Executive Office of Transporta- 
tion for a bus-only road between Mt . Vernon Street and the campus 
perimeter road. Such a road would permit MBTA buses from Forest 
Hills to serve the Columbia Point community as well as the 
campus, and present service on Route 8 to include the campus when 
classes are in session. A mechanically operated gate is proposed 
so as to prohibit other traffic on the road. Buses from Forest 
Hills would come into the campus in the morning via the current 
access road and leave the campus via Mt . Vernon Street, reversing 
the process in the afternoon. Mrs. Robinson said that a number 
of students now walk over to Mt . Vernon Street to get the bus to 
Andrew Station and she believes the busway would have a potential 
advantage for the campus. Trustee Clark asked what sort of com- 
munication had taken place with members of the community since 
she said originally residents in the housing project were con- 
cerned about UM/Boston traffic on Mt . Vernon Street. Chairman 
Spiller commented that the University should look at the EOTC 
proposal from the position of how it affects students and should 
weigh the advantages against the risks involved. Trustee Clark 
felt the route would be of more value to visitors to the Kennedy 
Library than to UM/Boston students. Chancellor Golino said 
that although the benefits to the campus are small, he is of the 
opinion that the busway should be given a trial. Since the pro- 
posal anticipates stops in the housing project, he feels it 
would tend to lessen the sense of isolation felt by people 
living there. 

It was the consensus of the Committee that the pro- 
posal should be given further consideration before a decision 
was made to endorse the project since there were serious reserva- 
tions as to its effect on the campus. Trustee Winthrop sug- 
gested that information be provided listing the advantages and 
disadvantages of the busway from the point of view of the 
University. 

Chairman Spiller then asked for status reports on the 
selection of designers for various projects. 

Mr. Meehan reported first on the problem of corrosion 
in the airconditioning system at the Harbor Campus. He said that 
two respected designers in this field had been ranked first and 
second by the designer selection board. One of these, Francis 
Associates, has been chosen to study the redesign of the system. 
Funds have been requested in the capital outlay budget to cover 
the cost of these repairs. 

Mr. Littlefield reported on three projects at UM/ 
Amherst now before the designer selection board. With regard to 
the Marine Science Station at Gloucester, a designer will be 



4947 



B&G Comm. 
4-21-76 

Busway 



Selection of 
Designers 



4948 



B&G Comm. 
4-21-76 



Building Author- 
ity Bond Issue 



UM/Amherst — 
Bus Transit 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

chosen for the repairs to the dock and the seawall, and the 
renovation and construction of limited instructional and research 
facilities. He noted that adjacent property owners are very 
much concerned as to how this site is developed. A designer 
will also be chosen for certain renovations to increase access 
to UM/Amherst buildings by handicapped persons. He said that 
$160,000 had been allotted by the Commonwealth to the campus 
for design and construction purposes. 

Mr. Littlefield then informed the Committee that $2 
million has been included in the "most urgent" capital budget 
for renovations at UM/Amherst, and an architect will be appointed 
to do a feasibility study to determine how this amount of money 
can be put to the most effective use in renovations to the 
Goodell Building. 

Chairman Spiller asked next for a report on the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authorit}'' bond issue. Mr. 
Post responded that the Building Authority had successfully 
negotiated a bond sale for Project #11, the Campus Center, at 
a rate of 7.48 percent. A portion of the costs of Project #14, 
Fraternity/Sorority Park, was part of this sale, and this pro- 
ject has now been terminated by the Building Authority. 



age Facility 
(Doc. T76-074) 



The next item to be discussed, said Chairman Spiller, 
was the matter of the Bus Transit Agreement/Storage Facility — 
Agreement / S tor- ' UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-074) . He asked Mr. Littlefield to report 

on this item. Mr. Littlefield said that the campus bus shuttle 
system had been originated by the students, and had later been 
supplemented by a demonstration grant from the federal govern- 
ment with the intent of providing a pedestrian core on the 
campus. The shuttle bus system and the service provided by 
the demonstration grant had been successful in lessening both 
the amount of vehicular traffic on campus and in the town of 
Amherst. The buses were originally owned 1/3 by the University 
and 2/3 by the government. Now, he said, the University would 
like to take ownership of the buses and the storage facility 
and to use state transit money rather than the operating budget. 
The law is such that in order to do this, the University must 
ask the town of Amherst to join with the University in requesting 
the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority to hire the University to 
provide bus service to the town and the campus. The town is in 
favor of the proposal as long as it has the assurance of the 
University that the town will incur no cost. Trustee Eddy 
stated that the town is supportive of the proposal and that 
she had prepared a statement to that effect, which included 
two very important codicils - 1) that when the town is billed 
for the bus service, the University will reimburse the town, and 
2) that the level of service will remain at the present level 
or be enhanced. She added that one of the positive effects of 
the bus system had been the reduction in the number of people 
hitchhiking through the town. She said that the town also 
supports the no-fare system, but that she felt it might create 



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problems with the PVTA and the state. There being no further 
discussion, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

it authorize the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, in consultation 
with the President of the University, to nego- 
tiate and execute an agreement with the Town 
of Amherst, to submit with the Town of Amherst 
a joint petition to the Pioneer Valley Transit 
Authority for the funding and operation of a 
transit system, and to negotiate and execute 
operating contracts with the Pioneer Valley 
Transit Authority to provide bus services as 
described in the agreement with the Town of 
Amherst, the joint petition and Trustee Docu- 
ment T76-074. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

it authorize the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, in consultation 
with the President of the University, to nego- 
tiate with the Pioneer Valley Transit Author- 
ity for the submission of an application for 
funds to acquire buses to replace and expand 
the existing bus fleet, for the construction 
of a bus maintenance facility, and for the 
use of land at the Amherst Campus for the 
construction and operation of said bus main- 
tenance facility, as described in Trustee 
Document T76-074. 

Mr. Littlefield next reported on the status of nego- 
tiations for the DPW by-pass at UM/Amherst, whereby a section 
of North Pleasant Street which runs through the campus would be 
closed to vehicular traffic. He said that a new source of 
opposition to the by-pass has recently developed in the community 
and the matter will come to an Amherst town meeting in May. He 
said this would be the sixth time in a period of eight years 
that this matter will have come to a town meeting. The current 
proposal is a compromise between a proposal by the Town, the DPW 
and the University. He said that an environmental impact study 
had taken three years, but was now completed. In the meantime, 
conditions in the town had changed, as had the town officers. 
Trustee Eddy said that the Town had been supportive of the by- 
pass, but the recent elections may mean a change in the posture 
of the Town, and the proposal was again in question. 

Chairman Spiller asked Mr. Grieg to report on energy 
conservation measures at UM/Worcester . Mr. Grieg said that the 
administration at the Medical Center has proposed an alternative 
approach to the problem of incompatibility in the supervisory 



4949 



B&G Comm. 
4-21-76 



UM/Amherst— 
DPW By-pass 



UM/Worcester — 
Energy Conserva- 
tion 



4950 



B&G Comm. 
4-21-76 



UM/Amherst- 
Fine Arts 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

data systems of the Medical School and Hospital. This approach 
would be less costly than that proposed by BBC. He said that 
Commonwealth Gas has indicated that gas service will be restored 
to the Medical Center later in the spring, which should permit 
fuel cost savings. 

In response to a query regarding the site work, Mr. 
Grieg said that the contractor should be finished with the south 
parking lot by May 20, and the landscaping will be in place 
during the summer . 

Chairman Spiller said that although this completed 
the formal agenda, Mrs. Robinson had been requested by Trustee 
Rowland, Chairman of the Long-Range Planning Committee, to ask 
for a report from the Buildings and Grounds Committee on the 
status of various items at the Fine Arts Center since the Long- 
Range Planning Committee would soon be meeting with members of 
the Advisory Council on the Fine Arts. 

Mr. Littlefield reported that there were still some 
unresolved problems. The hydraulic lift to the stage in the 
concert hall was not functioning properly, there were leaks in 
the heating system which caused heating problems in some of the 
music rooms, and the lighting and sound contracts were still 
not completed. The lighting contract, however, had been 
successfully bid, and there should, therefore, be money for 
the sound contract. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 1:00 p.m. 



^Ladys leith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



ATTENDANCE : 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 21, 1976; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Cronin, Morgenthau, Shaler, Winthrop 
and Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Secretary 
Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 



Committee Members Absent 



None 



Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical 
Studies; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization 
and Management; Ms. Frankel, Staff Assistant for Management and 
Business Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Wilkinson, 
Faculty Representative; Professor Mainzer, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Campus-Central Office Relations 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Professor Hittelman, Acting Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. Kenneth Somers , UM/ Amherst student; Ms. Susan 
Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 1:10 p.m. The 
first item of business was a discussion of faculty reports on 
Centralization and Organization within the University. President 
Wood reviewed for the Committee the Board votes inspired by the 
Hay Report which implemented some aspects of the Report on an 
interim basis. The results of those votes were: certain execu- 
tive salary policies were applied to senior executive positions; 
The Advisory Committee on Measurement and The Evaluation Review 
Committee were formed but have not met; and the Organization 
Design Review Committee was formed and has met on several impor- 
tant matters. He described some structural changes relating to 
MIS/ADP, the Treasurer's Office, and the hiring of the Vice 
President for Management and Business Affairs. President Wood 
concluded by saying that Congressman Conte's action in releasing 
a draft HEW report on the audit of federal grants to the School 
of Education showed that there was still concern in some quarters 



4951 



Centralization 
and Organization 
of the Univer- 
sity 



4952 



F&EP Comm. 
4-21-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

about the administration of the University. He said he had con- 
veyed his concern at the Congressman's action, since the report 
was only a draft, and since its findings are still subject to 
discussion. He then asked Vice President Janis to speak to the 
Committee. 

Mr. Janis said he had met with the UM/Boston Special 
Committee on Campus-President Relations, the Council of Deans 
at UM/ Amherst and the Rules Committee of the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate for the purpose of discussion and exchanging views on 
the issue of centralization. He then set forth four principles 
in his approach to business management in the University: first, 

i that each Chancellor must have available to him on his own campus 
the resources necessarv to administer his own institution ef fee- 
tively; second, that the Chancellor should be free from day-to- 

: day business in order to deal with the primary mission of the 
campus; third, that the President's office and campuses need to 
work closely together to build strong university-wide business 
subsystems (which would entail the appointment on each campus 
of a vice chancellor for administration and finance); and fourth, 
that the Board of Trustees' mandate for increased accountability 
requires a clear understanding of who is responsible at each 
management level and what is expected. 

Mr. Janis then discussed six business functions — 
automated data processing and management information systems; 
accounting; grants and contracts administration; purchasing; 
budgeting; and personnel/payroll — and situated them on a cen- 
tralization/decentralization continuum. The first three he 
placed near the centralization end of the continuum, and the 
last three he placed closer to the opposite end. He stressed 
that these positions were approximate and subject to different 
interpretation, but he believed that they fit properly where he 
had placed them. 



Chairman Troy asked how many new positions would be 
needed. Mr. Janis replied that he was seeking at present an asso- 
ciate vice president for business services to assist in accounting, 
audit, purchasing, grants and contracts and auxiliary enter- 
prises. He said he would need two or three more people in his 
own office as well. Some additional personnel might also be 
required for common services outside the President's office 
relative to ADP/MIS. He said, in addition, that he planned to 
make a strong argument, at the appropriate time and place, for 
considerably greater resources in the accounting and auditing 
area. This was essential, he said, especially in light of the 
draft HEW audit report. Some areas, he said, were being ade- 
quately administered at present — the accounting of state funds, 
for one — while other areas were in need of upgraded administra- 
tion. He cited the area of grants and contracts as an example 
of the latter. The greatest obstacle to this upgrading was 
insufficient resources. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Burack said she had carefully read all of the 
material which had been sent to her on the question of centraliza 
tion. She had found Mr. Janis's presentation interesting, but 
she felt that it had nothing to do with the organization of 
academic matters, which she had thought was a central faculty 
concern. Chairman Troy agreed that the matters discussed by 
Mr. Janis were not central to the issues with which this Com- 
mittee was concerned, but he did find them useful. Professor 
Wilkinson, however, disagreed with the Chairman, and said that 
he believed these matters to be crucial, and said he hoped they 
could be tied in with the more explicit concerns in the faculty 
reports . 

Trustee Morgenthau asked why no UM/Boston faculty 
representative was present. She said faculty governance was the 
reason that the issue of centralization had been raised before 
this Committee, and she wondered how it would be possible to 
proceed. Chancellor Golino explained that Professor Marshall, 
the former faculty representative, had resigned and no replace- 
ment had yet been named by the faculty, which was scheduled to 
meet for this purpose in a week. He said that Mrs. Marshall 
had also been concerned that there be faculty representation at 
this meeting, and she had personally called each member of the 
UM/Boston Special Committee on Campus-President Relations, but 
that none of the members were able to attend. She had indicated 
in her letter of resignation to the faculty, Secretary Hardy 
added, that this matter would be before this Committee and that 
a faculty representative should be present. 

Chairman Troy praised the Committee reports which had 
been circulated, and suggested that the Committee might aim today 
at the establishment of a multicampus committee to discuss the 
points which had been raised in the reports; he did not feel 
that it was appropriate for this Committee to try to address the 
details. Chancellor Golino observed that the UM/Boston report 
had called for such a multicampus committee. Chairman Troy 
asked whether Professors Wilkinson or Hittelman wished to reply 
to this suggestion. 

Professor Wilkinson asked to respond to a different 
issue. He observed that this was the Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee, but that neither the President nor Mr. Janis 
had once mentioned the teaching function of a University in 
their statements on management and business affairs. Teaching 
and research should be the heart of the University operation 
and the management aspect, while important, should be of concern 
to this Committee insofar as there is direct faculty participation 
in the allocation of resources to them. He expressed concern 
that such resources not be "taken off the top," and that the 
administrative function be given some kind of priority ranking 
with respect to the teaching function when the allocation of 
resources is made. He continued that there is a tendency for 



4953 



F&EP Comm. 
4-21-76 



4954 



F&EP Comm. 
4-21-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

faculty to distrust administrators and vice versa, and the faculty 
report had specifically called for greater harmony and trust 
between the two interests. His purpose here, he said, was not to 
continue to kick the administration, but to make the point that 
allocations of resources to administration should not be based 
on the assumption that it is possible to completely and clearly 
separate the managerial, accounting function from the classroom 
function. He described this assumption as dangerous. 

Mr. Janis responded that he had thought, when he made 
the point that the Chancellors should be free of day-to-day 
managerial decisions, that his acknowledgement of the primary 
importance of the academic mission was implied. Mismanagement, 
he said, could have the effect of damaging academic freedom. 

Trustee Burack said she was puzzled. When the Trustees 
had met with the Rules Committee of the Faculty Senate, Secretary 
Booth had called for a discussion of the "academic concerns" of 
the Hay Report. She expressed her displeasure that this dis- 
cussion had been delayed a great length of time. 

Chairman Troy stated that these concerns had been dis- 
cussed; the faculties had made oral reports at the November meet- 
ing of the Committee, and he himself had made a full report at 
the February Board meeting. He again offered the view that it 
was not possible for this Committee to resolve the specific fac- 
ulty concerns articulated in these reports. President Wood 
reminded the Committee that the Hay Report was not directed 
toward academic concerns. In his view, the faculty's real con- 
cern was with faculty participation in the planning and budgetary 
aspects of governance. The question, he said, was how to address 
this problem. 



Trustee Breyer agreed that the Hay Report is about 
management, and he said that Mr. Janis' s report had been interest 
ing, but he suggested that the real controversy lay in many 
small faculty irritations which were not manifest in the faculty 
reports. The seventeen points for discussion listed in the UM/ 
Amherst report were very general, he said, and it would be diffi- 
cult for this Committee to intelligently discuss more than a few 
of them because they were not accompanied by clear options. It 
was necessary, in his view, for the campuses and the President 
to get together and formulate options which could form the basis 
of the Committee's deliberations. As an example, he cited the 
statement in the Hay Report (page 70, //4) that the role of the 
Academic Vice President should grow. He sensed that this con- 
cept was worrisome to the faculty, but he doubted whether the 
Committee could say much about it without the information nec- 
essary for determining whether it was a good or bad development. 

Chancellor Bromery said that the faculty was not really 
concerned as to whether the data management system was located 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on the campus or in the Office of the President; what they were 
concerned about was the possibility that the system could grow 
swiftly, that they would have no influence over decisions as 
to how much would be allocated to it, and that they would receive 
the leftovers for academic programs. He added that, while the 
Committee could discuss the seventeen points in the Amherst fac- 
ulty's report, if this allocation decision question could be 
resolved, the others would be for the most part eliminated. 

Vice President Lynton pointed out that there was a 
natural tension between faculty and administration, whether 
within a campus or between campus and central office, but that 
it could be a creative tension. He suspected that the faculty 
felt that it was better able to maintain this creative tension 
on the campus because of proximity and because there were mech- 
anisms for both formal and informal faculty participation on the 
campus. He suggested the faculty felt, however, that there were 
not adequate mechanisms for direct participation in the informal 
decision-making process at the University level. There was no 
"solution" to this problem, he said, but perhaps it would be 
possible to take steps to enhance the faculty presence at the 
University level, such as with a multicampus campus-central 
office relations committee or by improved faculty representation 
to the Board. 

Mrs. Bluestone offered a medical analogy. Physicians, 
she said, tend to think that administrative functions happen 
magically: that a patient appears at the door and there are 
space and supplies adequate for his needs, and that nobody has 
to think about how this is to happen. But at the same time, 
they are inclined to complain if they think there are too many 
administrators or if too much money is being allocated to ad- 
ministrative functions. This, she said, is what appears to be 
happening here. Faculty want certain things to happen and don't 
want to be preoccupied with the housekeeping arrangements, but 
they can only complain about their fears, in part because of 
lack of information. 

She doubted that this Committee, or indeed a multi- 
campus committee, could solve this problem. What is needed, she 
suggested, is for an educational process to take place on the 
campuses so that the administrators and the faculty each under- 
stand the necessary roles of the other. In this way, an adminis- 
trator can become a strong advocate of a program if he or she 
is involved with planning from the start, and at the same time 
the faculty can come to understand what is necessary administra- 
tively for a program to be successful. But she doubted that 
another committee would be serviceable. 

Responding to Mr. Lynton 's suggestion, Trustee Morgen- 
thau said that communication was only one part of the problem; 
the other part was power. She said she had been struck, when 



4955 



F&EP Comm. 
4-21-76 



4956 



F&EP Comm. 
4-21-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

she had joined the Board of Trustees, at how much more power in 
public universities was in the hands of administrators than in 
private universities. President Wood interposed here the remark 
that it was not just a public-private difference, but a differ- 
ence based on stage of development and on whether a university 
had one campus or several. Trustee Morgenthau continued that 
she was concerned about the 'different types of processes and 
about the speed with which the University's processes were 
"going helter-skelter toward crucial decisions fundamentally 
altering power relationships without an adequate flow of communi- 
cation back and forth." This breakdown in communication, she 
said, and the lack of understanding of the necessity for these 
decisions had led to the strong feelings expressed. 

Trustee Morgenthau said the lack of UM/Boston faculty 
representation at this meeting demonstrated how thin the contact 
between the faculties and the central office and Board of Trustee 
was. Documents alone, she added, sometimes serve only to obscure 
communication. She requested, then, that two or three alternative 
formulae for faculty representation be presented to this Committee 



Trustee Cronin wondered whether this Committee should 
discuss the Harrington bill to reorganize public higher educa- 
tion, since that might make moot all the issues under discussion 
at this meeting. The President responded that it was important 
to separate University governance from the proposals for re- 
organization. He observed that the University's governance 
system was much farther along in terms of student and faculty 
participation than those of the other segments of higher 
education. 

Professor Mainzer was recognized, and he reiterated 
the position that administration and academic matters were not 
separable. The faculty's concern, he said, was about how to 
get the proper relationship between the faculty and the central 
office. He expressed approval of the Chairman's suggestion for 
a multicampus committee on campus-central office relations. 

Trustee Burack said that such a committee should dis- 
cuss the substance of these issues, and not just mechanisms. It 
should have a clear agenda, and the Trustee Committee should 
make clear what it wants to come out of such discussions. 

Trustee Breyer offered a hypothetical situation as an 
illustration of the issue. When a tenured faculty member in a 
certain academic department retires or resigns, by what mech- 
anism is the decision made as to whether the slot will be filled 
in that department, in another department or in another college 
of the University? He described several model methods used by 
different universities, and observed that there was a protec- 
tionist instinct among all faculty which made it unwise for those 
with a vested interest to make the decision, particularly in 
times of fiscal stringency. What then was the best method, he' 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

asked, for ensuring that the best choice is made from the educa- 
tional point of view? This was the critical issue here, he said, 
and it was not possible to answer it by reference to such broad 
generalities as being for or against centralization. 

A long discussion then ensued about problems of gov- 
ernance on the Boston campus, about possibilities for informal 
contacts between Trustees and faculty and the hazards thereof, 
and of the necessity for student participation in the proposed 
new multicampus committee. On the second point, Trustee Shaler 
said he would welcome such contacts, as long as they were informal 
sessions and not problem-solving sessions. To this Trustee 
Morgenthau responded that she suspected informal sessions were 
often the means by which problems were solved. 

Trustee Cronin stated that students tend to see Trus- 
tees as lofty, distant persons, and that contacts between Trus- 
tees and students could address general issues without necessarily 
resolving specific issues. Chairman Troy replied by urging the 
student Trustees to report fairly and accurately the frequently 
narrow constraints within which the Trustees must make their 
decisions. If they fail to do this, he said, the ill will which 
results can damage the University irreparably. 

Summarizing the expectations of the Committee, the 
Chairman reiterated that the campuses would make recommendations 
for the enhancement of faculty representation to the Board of 
Trustees. He recommended also that the faculties discuss and 
debate the possibility of setting up a multicampus committee to 
consider these issues. The campus committees could continue to 
meet, he proposed, but then would meet with their counterparts 
on the other campuses. Chancellor Bromery proposed that the 
several faculties get together and set up a subcommittee which 
would design a mandate for the multicampus committee. This 
mandate would be brought to the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy at its June meeting. 

President Wood said that communication will not work 
at any level if it is exclusive. Trustees will be overwhelmed 
with information if they do not have the benefit of a hierarchical, 
process. Further, the Chancellors' positions will be undermined 
if they become more conveyors of information from campus groups. 

Finally the President, as a personal comment reflecting 
his individual professional views as to the character of the 
Amherst faculty report and appended questions, indicated his 
deep disappointment in the quality of analysis and prescriptions. 
In his view, the maintenance of conditions of mutual trust and 
respect which the report adopted as a central theme seemed diffi- 
cult to realize, when the subsequent exposition was marred by 
internal contradictions within the report itself. Trust and 



4957 



F&EP Comm. 
4-21-76 



4958 



F&EP Comm, 
4-21-76 



UM/Amherst — 
Departmental 
Transfer and 
Name Changes 
(Docs. T76- 
068, T76-069, 
T76-070) 



UM/Amherst— 
Preliminary 
Graduation 
Lists (Doc. 
T76-075) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

respect were also marred by the use of inappropriate analysis 
drawn from government and business, the omission of specific 
information about university administration which was easily 
obtainable, and the introduction of normative and personal com- 
mentary which unfortunately was often of an implicit character 
that sometimes bordered on innuendo. He hoped that the new 
Multicampus Committee, which he said he both recommended and 
supported, could go about its work with a more substantial regard 
for academic standards. 

As the discussion concluded, Trustee Burack commended 
Chairman Troy for the openness with which he had conducted the 
meeting. 

The Chairman turned next to three changes in academic 
organization on the Amherst campus: Ph.D. Program in Spanish 
(Doc. T76-068), Transfer of Dance (Doc. T76-069) and Department 
of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Doc. T76-070) . The 



first and third items were name changes, and the second was 
approval of a change already carried out administratively at 
the Trustees' request. There was no discussion and, upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees redesignate 
the Five-College Cooperative Ph.D. Program in 
Spanish as the University of Massachusetts/Amherst 
Ph.D. Program in Spanish, as set forth in Doc. T76- 
068. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the transfer of the Dance program of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst from the School 
of Physical Education to the Faculty of Humanities 
and Fine Arts, as set forth in Doc. T76-069. To 
recommend further that the Department of Music be 
redesignated the Department of Music and Dance, 
and that the Department of Professional Preparation 
in Physical Education and Dance be redesignated 
the Department of Professional Preparation in 
Physical Education. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees redesignate 
the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineer- 
ing in the School of Engineering at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst as the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering, as set forth in Doc. T76-070 

The final item was approval of Preliminary Graduation 
Lists for May 1976 on the Amherst campus (Doc. T76-075) . Upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Preliminary Graduation Lists for the May 
1976 commencement at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. 
T76-075, subject to the completion of all re- 
quirements as certified by the Recorder of 
that campus. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 



4959 



F&EP Coram. 
4-21-76 




£^££- \ir&—M. 



Keith Hardy 



Y 



ecretary to the Board of Trustees 



4960 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



I 



ATTENDANCE : 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

May 4, 1976; 3:00 p.m. 
Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 
Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Spiller and 
Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Shaler 

Other Trustees : Trustees Cronin, Rothenburger , McNeil and Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academi 
Affairs; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cass, Special Assistan 
to the President; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assis 
ant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. White, 
The Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Dent, Director of Financial 
Aid 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Gaffney, Faculty Observe 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost 

Guests : Ms. Theresa Conti, UM/Boston Student Trustee-elect; Mr. 
Kirstein, UM/Boston Student Trustee staff; Ms. Tehan, Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 3:06 p.m. Chairman 
Healey recognized President Wood, who addressed the first matter, 
a proposed Need-Based Tuition Waiver Policy (Doc. T76-071) . The 
President recalled that the Board of Trustees had included, as 
part of the December 1975 vote raising tuition, a condition that 
incremental raises would not begin until the Trustees had approved 
a financial aid program to provide for student needs. The process 
of doing this had included the development of projections on the 
extent of unmet need, the sources of financial aid presently avail- 
able, etc. It had been ascertained, he said, that the Basic Op- 
portunity Grants and other existing aid programs funded by the 
federal government would cover the needs of the lowest income 
groups and the majority of students eligible for financial aid 
while the needs of the students ineligible for the BOG's and othef: 
federal and state programs — particularly middle-income students — 
could be met by the use of tuition waivers. 



4961 



Need-Based 

Tuition 

Waivers 

(Doc. T76-071) 



4962 



Exec. Coram. 
5/4/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President said that work to identify needs and re- 
sources should continue, but that the proposed one-year policy 
was adequate in its present form. He then asked Mrs. Hanson to 
elaborate the program further. 

Mrs. Hanson said that the plan, which proposed the 
allocation of tuition waivers for use by financial aid offices, 
had been drafted cooperatively by the President's Office and the 
campuses. It had been reviewed in its formative stages by the 
Multicampus Budget Committee, and later by the Trustee Budget and 
Finance Committee, in both instances without substantial disagree- 
ment. She reported what she described as good news with respect 
to federal financial aid in FY 1977: an expected $1.2 million 
increase for the University over FY 1976. She said she expected 
that bills would be filed in Congress after the elections to re- 
establish multi-year programs and that, when these are enacted, 
it will be possible to present the Trustees with a more long-range 
financial aid program, sometime in the spring of 1977. 

Speaking to the projected $1.2 million increase in fed- 
eral aid, Trustee Rowland asked whether she was correct in under- 
standing that this increase was made possible by the conditional 
raise in tuition in December. Mrs. Hanson replied affirmatively, 
and said that as a result of the December vote, the President's 
Office was able to amend its application for aid in time to meet 
the deadline. Chairman Healey commented that this was one of the 
reasons that the Board of Trustees had had to raise tuition when 
it had. 



Mrs. Hanson asked Mr. Dent to explain the use of waivers 
in the financial aid process. Mr. Dent reported that his office 
had received about 11,000 financial aid applications to date. The 
office would review the students' resources carefully, and would 
provide as much aid as possible from standard sources. If these 
resources proved inadequate to cover a student's need, a tuition 
waiver could then be provided. In other words, the waivers would 
be used in the same way as other resources, but would be used to 
fill the gap when others were exhausted. 



Mrs. Hanson explained that certain categories of courtesy 
waivers contained in Doc. T75-075B would need to be reviewed again 
next year in the process of developing a comprehensive tuition 
waiver policy. But she stressed that the $250,000 worth of waived 
tuition was a new resource above existing, non-need based waivers 
Chairman Healey commented that the Trustees would have to conduct 
a comprehensive review of all types of waivers presently being 
granted. The President added a point of clarification: that 
need-based waivers could be granted only to resident students. 

Chancellor Golino informed the Committee that the foreign 
students on the Boston campus had asked him to relay to the Com- 
mittee their serious plight. He said he was aware of, and was 



I 



I 



4963 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

grateful for, the action of the Board on January 7, 1976, in re- 
lieving the problems of some foreign students (see Executive min- 
utes of January 7, 1976), but said there were still serious prob- 
lems. Trustee Robertson asked for further information about this, 
and Mrs. Hanson explained that only nonstate scholarship funds 
could be used for foreign students. She said that the allocation 
of the limited funds available for such students should be deter- 
mined by the campuses. She agreed it would be difficult to main- 
tain the foreign students already at the University, and said the 
University was writing to the foreign governments in an effort to 
get some help for the students. The Chancellor said forty to fiffy 
foreign students were in a very precarious position. Some, he 
said, do not have enough money to return home. 

President Wood alluded to the rising barriers of state 
universities against nonresident students. He said this phenom- 
enon was evidence of an increasing and deplorable provincialism. 

Trustee Cronin asked whether it would be possible to 
revise this proposed policy annually, and the Chairman answered 
that, while the Board has committed itself to restudy the policy 
in 1977, it could not place such a commitment on a future Board. 

Professor Smith said that a group of medical students 
had asked him to relay a memorandum to the Committee. The sub- 
stance of the memorandum was that the medical students were appre- 
ciative of the tuition waiver aid being extended to them by this 
policy, but that serious problems in financial aid for medical 
students remained. He commented that the Medical School has fort^ 
students with debts in excess of $5,000. 

Mrs. Hanson said that first-year medical students could 
expect relief in that an increase is expected in the amount of 
National Direct Student Loans. When these funds are being distri- 
buted across the campuses, she said, the President's Office can 
ensure that an increase is allocated to the Medical School which 
would take up slack created by the elimination of the Health Pro- 
fessions Loan programs. 



As a final point of information on tuition waivers, Mr. 
Lynton revealed that, as a result of the tuition waiver policy 
adopted by the Board in February 1975 (Doc. T75-075B) , $700,000 
less in tuition waivers as compensation had been granted in the 
current academic year than in the previous year. 

There was no further discussion, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
establish and approve a program of financial 
need-based tuition waivers to be administered 
by the Financial Aid Offices in accordance with 
the guidelines set forth in Trustee Document 



Exec. Comm, 
5/4/76 



4964 



Exec. Comm. 
5/4/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

T76-071 provided that the standard need analysis 
referred to on page 12 of said document shall 
conform to federally approved procedures; further 
that said program shall be reviewed as part of an 
overall review of University tuition waiver programs 
and shall be revised as appropriate. 

UM/Amherst — The next matter was the proposed Appointment of Ross 

Dean of College Whaley as Dean of the College of Food and Natural Resources at 
of Food and UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-076) . Vice President Lynton said that Dr. 
Natural Whaley, presently Head of the Department of Landscape Architecture, 
Resources was one of the outstanding faculty members on the Amherst campus, 
(Doc. T76-076) and added that the campus had been fortunate in being able to re- 
tain him and appoint him to this position, since he had had attrac- 
tive offers from the State of Colorado and from Purdue University 
Chancellor Bromery reported that this position was extremely im- 
portant in that it interfaced with the Farm Bureau and the state 
Extension Service. Dr. Whaley had held meetings with Commissione:: 
Winthrop and with the Farm Bureau, said the Chancellor, and they 
were supportive of this appointment. 

President Wood underscored the previous remarks and said 
that, while this appointment represented a departure from the 
usual recruitment approach for such positions, the bridge between 
the College of Food and Natural Resources and other professional 
schools such as landscape architecture was a healthy development. 



I 



Proceeding from this appointment, the President informed 
the Committee that he would be placing before it at its June meet- 
ing a proposal for an executive compensation policy for the Uni- 
versity administration. He noted in this context three sets of 
pressures which come to bear on this issue: (1) the gradual closing 
of the gap for compensation between senior professors and deans 
and other principal academic officers that came about as a result 
of increases in faculty compensation in recent years, (2) the need 
to establish differentials, at least between department heads and 
deans, in order to successfully recruit deans in the future, and 
(3) the effects of these increases on the interface between deans 
and vice chancellors , between vice chancellors and between chan- 
cellors and other senior administrative officers. 

There was no other comment and, upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur with 
the President in the appointment by the Chancellor 
of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst of 
Dr. Ross S. Whaley as Dean of the College of Food 
and Natural Resources, Director of the Experiment 
Station and Director of the Extension Service 
effective August 1, 1976. 



I 



I 



Exec. Comm. 
5/4/76 

UM/Amherst, 
UM/Boston 
Codes of Stu- 
dent Conduct 
(Docs. T73-005 
T73-006) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman then turned to the proposed ratification 
of the Codes of Student Conduct at UM/Amherst and UM/Boston (Docs 
T73-005, T73-006). President Wood cited three incidents which 
had revived efforts to put into effect up-to-date codes of studen 
conduct: (1) the character of recent Board meetings, (2) the 
emphasis in the UM/Worcester accreditation committee's report on 
the need to upgrade student affairs services, and (3) the heavy 
stress during the UM/Boston merger debate on the need to safeguarji 
student support services. 

The President continued that there are differences be- 
tween the Amherst and Boston codes but that they are in agreement 
in major respects. The campuses had indicated the importance of 
maintaining separate codes, he said, in view of the difference 
between them, but counsel had suggested the desirability of com- 
posing a single code which contained within itself sections which 
take into account the differences between the two campuses. Wor- 
cester also, he said, ought to move to develop such a code. 

President Wood added that this reaffirmation would be 
of an interim nature, since the campuses were working on new code£ 
to bring to the Trustees. These codes, he added, had been origi- 
nally voted in 1966 and slightly revised in 1972. 

He then called on Chancellor Bromery. Chancellor Brome 
reported that the students had devised a new student code in 1973 
which substantially changed provisions for picketing. Certain 
aspects of these changes had provoked faculty opposition which he 
had felt compelled to support. The students and faculty had en- 
deavored to iron out their differences, but had not yet done so. 
On the subject of a single code, the Chancellor agreed with the 
concept, but suggested that such would be the proper charge to a 
multicampus committee. 



Trustee Spiller asked Chancellor Bromery for a summarized Conduct of 



4965 



comment with respect to the events at the April 7 Board meeting. 
The Chancellor said that his forthcoming recommendations would be 
forward-looking, dwelling mainly on what should be done in the 
future rather than on what should or should not have been done in 
the past. 

The Chancellor said that there needed to be a greater 
awareness on the campus that there was a procedure by which mat- 
ters of interest could be brought to the Board's attention. 
There needs to be an understanding that having input into Trustee 
deliberations does not necessarily mean that the Trustees must 
agree with the advice given. There are some on the campuses, he 
said, who have a simplistic idea of power: they think that since 
Chapter 75 gives all power to the Trustees that they need not 
bother with the levels of authority in between. People need to 
realize that "end-running" the Chancellor is an unworkable tactic 
for the realization of student or faculty objectives. They need 



Trustee Meetings 



4S66 



Exec. Coram. 
5/4/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to realize that a meeting of the Board of Trustees is not a New 
England Town Meeting. 

Chairman Healey stated that the Board had understood 
the need for some mechanism by which campus constituencies could 
have input into the policy-approval process. A compromise solution 
had been the liaison committee route, which had been modified and 
reaffirmed at the March meeting. Chairman Healey said he was dis* 
tressed at the deterioration in the character of Board meetings, 
that meetings had been taken over by audience participation. 
Board meetings had become like a lightning rod, he said, and unti". 
he received absolute assurance that meetings could be held on the 
campuses in an orderly fashion, meetings would be held elsewhere. 
He said a cooling-off period was needed. 



Chancellor Bromery said that part of the problem lay in 
the lack of understanding on the part of many that there is, in 
fact, considerable participation in Trustee deliberation. He said 
the student leaders were aware that this was so, but there seemed 
to be insufficient filtering down of this information to the stu- 
dents as a whole. People don't realize how much participation by 
constituencies does take place, he said. 

Trustee Cronin reported that he had tried to make the 
point to students that the real work of the Trustees is done in 
the Committees, not before the full meeting of the Board. One 
problem was the difficulty of getting information prior to the 
Committee meetings so that the students could study it and offer 
viable alternatives, when necessary. Another problem was the view 
of many students that the governance system doesn't work. He 
added that there is always a great deal of disrespect for the Stu- 
dent Government Association on the part of some parts of the stu- 
dent body, and said the SGA cannot be held responsible for the 
actions of an unofficial minority. 

Trustee Spiller mentioned a recent direct mailing to 
Trustees of a set of demands signed by the President of the 
Graduate Student Senate, the Speaker of the Undergraduate Student 
Senate and others. He stated in the strongest terms his intentioi}i 
as a Trustee never to respond to any document prefaced with the 
phrase, "We demand." He said that the Trustees should take a 
strong stand on this . 



A long discussion followed about the proper response, 
if any, which the Trustees should make to communications of this 
kind, and about the status of the communication. Trustee Cronin 
confirmed that the document had been voted by the Student Senate, 
and that it was therefore official and did not represent merely 
the personal views of the signatories. Chancellor Bromery pointed 
out that this document had not been officially transmitted to him 
through the governance procedure, therefore it would not be appro- 
priate for the Trustees to respond directly. 



4S67 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary Hardy explained that concern had been express 
ed at the March Executive Committee meeting about the need for 
Trustees to be kept informed about what happens on the campuses. 
For that reason, she makes a practice of forwarding to the Trus- 
tees items which are addressed to them and sent to her office. 
She does not submit them, however, as items for the Board or Com- 
mittee agendas. Chairman Healey said that the Trustees could not 
respond to this document because it had not followed the proper 
procedure, apart from the language in which it was couched. 

Trustee Croce observed what he called a gap between the 
student leaders and their constituencies. The proper place for 
the students to make their representations is before the Committed 
of the Board, with the Committee Chairman's permission. Trustee 
Carlson said, however, that most of the work is done even before 
a matter comes to the Committee — it is done on the campus, and 
that is where student participation is most appropriate. 

Trustee Troy pointed out that there had been considerable 
participation of both graduate and undergraduate students in the 
Trustee debate on tuition by the Executive Committee and full 
Board in November and December. The students had, he said, the 
examples of the moderation of the phased increase in contrast wit 
the ruthless action of the Legislature in raising tuition for non- 
resident students. And yet the student leaders had showed no goo 
will whatsoever in their reports to their constituencies; their 
reports had been distorted with the deliberate aim of creating th£ 
confrontation which had occurred at the December meeting. 

The student position at the December meeting, he contin 
ued, was that the Trustees' expressed intention to devise a tuitifcy 
waiver policy to mitigate the effects of the tuition raise was a 
fraud, yet here was the policy, just as promised. This troubled 
him very seriously, he said; the Trustees had showed good faith 
and good will, but the student leadership had not reciprocated. 
The document sent to the Trustees, he concluded, was immature and 
insincere. 

What must happen, the Chairman commented, was that the 
general student body, and not just a vocal minority, must get 
involved in student governance or else institutions such as the 
University will be destroyed. It would become impossible to get 
individuals of good will to serve on Boards of Trustees under such 
conditions. 

Trustee Rothenburger stated that there would always be 
a disruptive minority among students on the campuses, a minority 
which would not listen to either the administration or the studen 
leadership . 

President Wood observed that Trustee Rothenburger 's 
understanding of student behavior was somewhat timebound, in that 



Exec. Comm. 
5/4/76 



4968 



Exec. Comm. 
5/4/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the politicization of the American University dated roughly from 
the beginning of the Vietnam War. Before that, students seldom 
became aroused unless a popular professor failed to receive tenure 
He added, however, that he would not favor a return to the apoli- 
tical student mentality. 

During the Vietnam period, as now, the highly active 
students were a minority geared primarily toward revolutionary 
politics. The key difference between that period and the present 
however, was that at that time the minority had the capacity to 
express the views of the majority in many respects. This was why 
there had been little administrative action against disruptive 
persons. Today's minority, however, does not have the power of 
influence to turn on the mass of students with its orientation 
toward neo-Marxist economics and unionization. And, the Presiden 
remarked, meetings which are dealing with University life are not 
the place to debate neo-Marxist economics. The President contin- 
ued that, in his view, the administrative response on the campuses 
would not be what it was during the Vietnam era. Chairman Healey 
then commented that the events of recent meetings had called into 
question the representational character of speeches made before 
the Board. Such speeches represented only a handful, said Trus- 
tee Carlson. 

A discussion followed about student unionizing activi- 
ties. Chairman Healey commented that establishing a union would 
be only a structural change, and would still not resolve the prob- 
lem of representation of students. President Wood added that he 
did not believe that collective bargaining was a sensible mode of 
action for students: their position was more like consumers and 
the proper mechanism for advocating such an interest, he said, was 
not a labor union. He pointed out that the principal weapon of a 
union was a strike, and such an action would be completely inef- 
fective in advancing student interests. The only effect would be 
to alienate the public whose taxes in large measure subsidize the 
education which the students receive. 

Trustee Gordon remarked that, if the principle were 
accepted that those who "consume" higher education should have 
all power over it, then the Board of Trustees would be eliminated 
He doubted that the students could do a better job in advocating 
the interest of the University before the Legislature than the 
Trustees . 



Trustee Cronin agreed that the type of union the studen 
contemplated was more like a consumer advocacy organization than 
a labor union. Such a union would enable the students to address 
such issues as class size and degree requirements, which the 
faculty strongly believes to be its exclusive area of expertise. 

The Chairman observed that students come and go, but 
the Board of Trustees is in a position to take the longer view 



P 



I 



P 



4369 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of what is in the best interest of the University. As an example 
he said, there had been fierce student and faculty opposition to 
building the Boston campus on Columbia Point. Now, he said, most 
of them agree that it was the right move. The Trustees had not 
always been right, he said, but their record in governing the Uni- 
versity had been pretty good. The governance document provides 
for cooperation in good faith between the different communities 
in the University, and the Trustees were committed to listen to 
those who genuinely represented the students. 

The Committee turned briefly to a discussion of the 
extremely low turnout of students for the UM/Boston Student Trus- 
tee election. Chairman Healey took this opportunity to introduce 
the new Student Trustee-elect from UM/Boston, Theresa Conti. Var4 
ious points of view on the election were put forth, such as that 
the Trustees ought to set some minimum level of participation for 
certification of a Student Trustee. Trustee Rothenburger pointed 
out, however, that such a procedure would be highly undemocratic. 
The Chairman asked Ms. Conti for her views on this issue. Ms. 
Conti observed that the election turnout, while admittedly low, 
was not unusually so. She said that the campus Student Affairs 
Committee intended to look into the ways in which elections are 
held on the Boston campus. Chairman Healey offered the suggestion 
that when there are several candidates and the winner gets only a 
small plurality, a runoff election might be an improvement. 

Speaking to his statement that many students feel that 
the governance system is not working, Trustee Rowland asked Trus- 
tee Cronin to provide a report setting forth detailed reasons as 
to why it was not. She hoped that this could be discussed soon. 
Trustee Cronin indicated his intention to document this issue. 

There was no further discussion, and, after motions 
were made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm 

and adopt the Code of Student Conduct, UM/ Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T73-005; Motor Vehicles Rules 
and Regulations, UM/Amherst, as set forth in Doc. 
T75-155; and Rules and Regulations relative to the 
Possession, Consumption and Sale of Alcoholic Bev- 
erages, UM/Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T74-081A. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm 
and adopt the Code of Student Conduct, UM/Boston, 
as set forth in Doc. T73-006; Motor Vehicle Rules, 
Regulations, and Traffic Signs, UM/Boston, as set 
forth in Doc. T74-045A; and Policies and Procedures 
Relative to the Consumption and Sale of Alcoholic 
Beverages, UM/Boston, as set forth in Doc. T75-015A. 

Finally, the Executive Committee heard a report from 



Exec. Comm. 
5/4/76 



UM/Boston— 
Student 
Trustee 
Election 



4970 



Exec. Coram. 
5/4/76 

Faculty 

Collective 

Bargaining 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Assistant Vice President Kaplan on developments with regard to 
faculty collective bargaining. He described the issues which had 
been resolved by hearings before the State Labor Relations Com- 
mission, and set forth the issues remaining to be resolved. 

This concluded the business before the Committee, and 
the meeting was adjourned at 5:05 p.m. 



Gladys feeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



1 



■ 



ATTENDANCE: 



4971 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

May 11, 1976; 12:00 p.m. 
Room SF1-4 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Robertson; Trustees 
Abrams, McNeil, Mrs. Blues tone representing Trustee Fielding; 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Croce and Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for University Polic^; 
Ms. Veith, Staff Assistant 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Susan Smith, Faculty 
Representative; Mr. Brennan, Student Representative; Dr. Andrew 
Canada, Director of Pharmacy and Clinical Pharmacy; Dr. Louis 
Fazen, Department of Community and Family Medicine; Dr. Milford 
Greene, Assistant Dean of Students and Affirmative Action Officer 
Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hos- 
pital Director; Mrs. Janis, Office of the Chancellor 

Guest : Ms. Susan Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was convened at 12:35 p.m. Chairman Robert 
son reversed the order of the agenda, and asked the Chancellor to 
report, not only on accreditation, but also on the Medical School 
Group Practice and on anything else which he believed to be of 
interest to the Trustees. Speaking first to accreditation, the 
Chancellor said the Accreditation Committee had made two major 
recommendations: (1) that the Medical School's student affairs 
capability be expanded (although he added that this would probably 
be a valid recommendation for the whole of the Medical School's 
administration), and (2) that the Medical School develop graduate 
programs in the biomedical sciences. 

A second item of information the Chancellor put forth 
was that open heart surgery would be performed soon at the Univer- 
sity Hospital. He told the Committee that 100 to 150 open heart 
operations are performed for Worcester area residents per year at 
Massachusetts General Hospital. The MGH cannot expand its capac- 
ity, and there is therefore a long line of such persons. For thi| 
reason it was felt that open heart surgery would be necessary at 
the Medical Center and the planning of the Hospital from the begin- 
ning had taken this expectation into account. Surgeons from the 
MGH would perform the surgery at the University Hospital, coming 
out in four to six-month rotations. He commented that the Chief 
of Cardiac Surgery at MGH was Dr. Gordon Buckley, a resident of 
Worcester, and reputedly the best cardiac surgeon in the world. 
He went on to explain some of the details of the program, and ex- 



Report of 

Chancellor 

Bulger 



4972 



Health Affairs 
5/11/76 



Poison 
Control 



Affirmative 
Action 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

plained that, although open heart surgery has an average mortality 
rate of 8 percent, the University Medical Center's program is ex- 
pected to have a mortality rate of 1 percent. This will be because 
the Hospital will begin with only the simplest cases. 

Chancellor Bulger then briefly reviewed the rules and 
purpose of the Group Practice Plan (Doc. T75-144A) for clinical 
faculty. He described the current funding status of the Group 
Practice, and described some of the aspects of the plan which 
would have to be monitored carefully. He then responded to some 
technical questions about the role of associate members of the 
Group Practice. 

The Chairman next recognized Dr. Canada, who had ex- 
pressed a desire to update the Committee on the progress of the 
proposed Poison Control Center at the Medical Center. Dr. Canada 
had distributed a memorandum to the Committee which he and Dr. 
Fazen then summarized. Should the Medical Center be chosen as 
the state Poison Information Center, there would be approximately 
two years' worth of hard money funding at about $100,000 annually. 
There had been a commitment in principle from the Department of 
Public Health to continue financial support after the initial 
period expires. 

Chairman Robertson next recognized Dr. Milford Greene 
to make a presentation on the Affirmative Action status of the 
Medical Center which had been requested by Trustee McNeil at the 
February meeting. A document had been prepared and distributed 
at this meeting, which was now briefly summarized. After running 
through the figures, Dr. Greene said the number of minority faculty 
and staff was low and revealed that he was now chairing a search 
committee for an Affirmative Action director, a position for which 
money had been requested in the FY 1977 maintenance budget request 
Speaking to the figures, Dr. Greene observed that, of 131 full- 
time faculty, 14 were female and 3 were black, each a male. The 
picture with respect to students was more favorable, although the 
University had the problem of serious competition from the several 
private medical schools in the state. 



Dr. Greene recalled a question from one of the Trustees 
at the February 24 meeting of the Committee about early identifi- 
cation of high school students interested in medical school, and 
an effort to give such students special help in their undergradu- ' 
ate studies with the eventual aim of admitting them to medical 
school. He said an application for federal funding for such a 
program had been made to the Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare, but he added that he doubted it would be funded. There 
was a brief discussion of the outline of such a program. 

Mrs. Blues tone said she shared the concern for minority 
recruitment in faculty and students, but observed that the Medical- 
Center had not done well in beginning recruitment at any level. 



4973 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

She asked what the plans were for recruiting personnel for staff 
positions in the Hospital and Medical School. Dr. Greene replied 
that he had been in touch with many community organizations, and 
that these organizations had sent many individuals for interviews 
Unfortunately, he said, when recruiting persons for positions 
critical to the opening of the Hospital, the Center could not take 
people who were untrained. He said an "unbelievable" number of 
persons came in "who could do nothing but sweep", and he said 
training programs were needed which would help bring about an up- 
ward mobility. The Medical Center could recruit all it wanted, 
he said, but would not come up with the needed personnel without 
training them itself. 

Chairman Robertson said that the document which had 
been distributed was fat, and he had not had a chance to study it 
Verbal reports were interesting, but he believed it was necessary 
for the Trustees to have something written in advance which they 
could study. He advised the administration to "take a picture" 
of the Center's personnel profile as it was at present, then ana- 
lyze what steps it should take to make improvements. He asked 
that such a report, coupled with a specific implementation plan, 
be submitted to the Committee well in advance of a future meeting 

Chancellor Bulger told the Committee that figures gathe^: 
ed by the American Association of Medical Colleges showed that 11 
percent of first appointments to medical schools nationally in the 
early fifties had been female. In the last five years, 20 percen 
of such first appointments had been female. The University had 
made its first appointments in the past five years, he said, but 
it was clear that it had not done this well. What had happened 
at the Medical School, he said, was that there had been an air of 
constant crisis with the opening of the Hospital — such as the 
hiring of 300 persons in five weeks. Now, however, with the pros- 
pect of hiring 400 to 500 more persons over the next year, the 
Medical Center could expect to have a reasonable set of approaches 
which it would try to present to the Committee. 

Trustee McNeil, addressing the question of skill level 
of minority persons in Worcester, said she knew that there were 
skilled persons in Worcester, but that there had perhaps been a 
failure of communication between the community organizations and 
the Medical School. She suggested that the School get in touch 
with persons in the community who were in touch with skilled per- 
sons. Dr. Greene agreed that there were undoubtedly skilled per- 
sons, and added that he had identified some. He looked forward 
to the next hiring phase which Dr. Bulger mentioned as an opportu- 
nity to make clear gains. 

Trustee Abrams said that Dr. Greene's proposal for early 
identification of high school students was the first he had heard 
about this idea since the Trustees had passed such a proposal 
three years ago. 



Health Affairs 
5/11/76 



4974 



Health Affairs 
5/11/76 



UM/Worcester — 
New Appoint- 
ments with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T76-079) 



Hospital 

Management 

Board 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Robertson asked that the report on implementa- 
tion and goals for affirmative action be filed with the Committee 
for the September meeting. Secretary Hardy remarked that for a 
report to be ready for the Committee in time it should be sent to 
I the Secretary before the end of August. 

The next agenda item was a discussion of several proposed 
New Appointments with Tenure at UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-079). Sec- 
retary Hardy explained that these were all Medical School faculty ! 
and, although it was the responsibility of the Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy to recommend concurrence of the Board, it 
was felt to be appropriate that these proposed appointments be 
reviewed by this Committee before they are considered by F&EP. 
I Vice President Lynton reported the President's enthusiastic en- 
dorsement of these recommendations. After a brief discussion, the 
Committee 



VOTED : To recommend that the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy recommend to the Board of 
Trustees its concurrence with the President's 
New Appointments with Tenure at the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester, as set forth in 
Doc. T76-079. 

The final matter was the composition of the Hospital 
Management Board at UM/Worcester. The Committee had asked for 
nominations to this body in the period since its last meeting, 
and had received a list of 21 nominations. Chairman Robertson 
j initiated the discussion with the statement that he did not be- 
lieve the Committee or the Chairman of the Board should be limited 
to the distribution of professional categories on the list. The 
mission of the Committee was to review these persons and to come 
to whatever consensus it could with respect to the names before 
it. Associate Vice President Eller briefly reviewed the mandate 
of the Hospital Management Board. He told the Committee that 
Chairman Healey had reviewed the original list of nominations 
totaling 51 names and that he looked forward to the Committee 
members' guidance and advice on the 21 names. 

There followed a series of comments on the individuals 
nominated, none of which were unfavorable with respect to the 
merits of the individuals, but some of which questioned whether 
the individuals would have enough time to devote to the Board. 
It was stated that any individuals chosen should be prepared to 
commit themselves to a demanding role on the Board. The point 
was made that some of the individuals were aware of their nomina- 
tions, while some were not. Trustee Abrams asked whether it would 
be appropriate to add names to the list, and Chairman Robertson 
replied that he did not think it would be appropriate at this 
late stage. After further discussion of the individuals, the 
sense of the Committee was expressed as follows: that all of the 
individuals nominated were acceptable to the Committee. 



4975 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 



Health Affairs 
5/11/76 



AiU.Uyr k^3C IW— L 



Chladyi Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4976 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



ATTENDANCE: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 18, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 

Fourteenth Floor Conference Room 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Cronin, Morgenthau, Shaler and Mr. Colby 
representing Trustee Winthrop ; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, 
recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Fielding 

Other Trustees : Trustee Conti 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Ms. Crosson, 
Staff Associate for Academic Affairs; Ms. Weiner, Assistant Vice 
President for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel- 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Associate 
Provost; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. James, Assistant Provost; Pro- 
fessor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Edgar Smith, Associate Dean 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Susan Smith, Faculty 
Representative 

Guests : Professors Maki, Boudreau, Zahn and Chavous , all members 
of the Ad Hoc Multi-campus Academic Personnel Policy Committee; 
Mr. Ed Harris, Director of University Without Walls, UM/Amherst; 
Mr. Rothenburger , Mr. Martus and Ms. Guttenberg, all students; 
Mr. Kirstein, UM/Boston Student Trustee Staff; Ms. Tehan, Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 10:00 a.m. The first 
item of business was Tenure Awards at UM/Amherst, Boston and Wor- 
cester (Doc. T76-080A) . Chairman Troy called upon the President 
for his opening remarks. President Wood began, with the Chair- 
man's permission, by discussing the process followed at UM/Boston 
He observed that the Committee had received the documentation sup- 
porting the campus's recommendations, as well as his own decision^. 
This was the third year that the tenure awards had been carried 
out under the University Governance Policy (T73-098) , and he de- 
scribed this year's process as the most orderly and characterized 
by the most critical review of the three years. 



4977 



Tenure Awards 




4978 



F&EP Comm, 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There remained work to be done, said the President, on 
bringing tenure recommendations into line with long-range depart- 
mental and college plans. This was a process which had been af- 
fected by last year's budget crisis when there had been doubt a- 
bout the possibility of keeping all the faculty already at the 
University. The long-range planning would soon begin again, how- 
ever. 

The President regretted the lateness of these tenure 
appointments, but said that the Academic Policy (T75-125) requirec 
that a decision on any level be communicated back down to each 
level below, thus prolonging the process. He commented, finally, 
that he was holding several cases without prejudice pending the 
provision of further information, and would deal with other remain- 
ing cases at a special meeting to be held June 2. He then asked 
Vice President Lynton to speak about the process which had been 
followed. 

Mr. Lynton briefly reviewed the steps in the process 
from the submission of materials by the candidates, to the departs 
mental personnel committee's recommendation, to the school or 
college's personnel committee's recommendation, up through the 
Chancellor, who makes his recommendations to the President. The 
President then makes his decisions. The Chancellor's negative 
decisions are not forwarded to the President. 

The Chairman recognized Chancellor Golino. The Chancel- 
lor said that this year's process had been speedier and more effec- 
tive than that of the year before. All of the cases appointed by' 
the President for the Boston campus were solid and amply justified, 
in his view. At the same time, he said, he believed that the de- 
partmental level was still the weak link in the chain. He would 
be more than happy to comply with the AAUP standard that only in 
"rare and compelling" instances should a faculty's judgment be 
reserved, but it was difficult to do so when some departments 
indiscriminately recommend tenure for every person scheduled for 
a decision. There simply must be more responsibility assumed at 
the departmental level. 



Trustee Burack asked whether, in the cases of brilliant 
persons who were serving in departments fully or almost fully 
tenured, there were alternate ways of keeping them. Mr. Lynton 
commented that in such a case, it has been the practice to appoint 
the person to tenure, even if it brought the department to full 
tenure, because it was felt not to be in the University's interest 
to lose such a person. The University holds to the AAUP guide- 
lines and does not keep people on indefinitely without a decision 
of tenure. However, it is good practice for departments to keep 
one or two slots open for visiting professorships or the like. 

Trustee Morgenthau said she was concerned at the pros- 
pect of seven, eight, or nine persons in the same department re- 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ceiving tenure at the same time. Such people will grow old to- 
gether, she said, and the effect is to exclude the addition of 
young, talented persons. whenever young talent is excluded, she 
said, the quality of the University suffers. 

President Wood said that the University was being force[i 
to raise the issue of institutional self-discipline. While it 
was not in as serious a situation with respect to the tenure per- 
centages as Berkeley or Wisconsin, it was getting close. Mr. Lyn- 
ton agreed, and remarked that there was reason to wonder whether 
it was possible for a faculty to exercise the kind of rigorous 
review necessary by self-discipline alone. This was a problem in 
the departmental level in Boston and on the decanal level at Am- 
herst. 

Trustee Breyer said this and Trustee Morgenthau's con- 
cern about the numbers raised a very serious issue: do we want 
a University with 80 percent of its faculty tenured? President 
Wood said he would like to see injected into the system compari- 
sons with other universities, at least in this area, and some 
attention to who is coming along behind those candidates schedule 
for a decision in a given year. 

Trustee Morgenthau said that while she believed it un- 
wise for the Trustees to be making tenure decisions themselves, 
she believed that it was proper for this Committee to set the ton^ 
of the rigor that is required in times of fiscal stringency. Thi 
is also a time when the capacity for recruiting good faculty is 
better than ever, and that capacity should be reflected in the 
data sent to the Board. She said she missed evidence of good re- 
search, rather than just a statement of research. She said the 
vague statements about qualifications of individuals were not 
enough. Vice President Lynton pointed out that full information 
about research and professional activity was contained in each 
tenure file and, as noted in the President's advance memorandum, 
was available for inspection. 

Chancellor Bromery said that the Board should set policy 
and let the campuses apply it. It was not reasonable for the 
Trustees to be examining publications. A policy should be set on 
tenure so that an individual can be advised of what is expected 
of him when he is appointed, not when he is being considered for 
tenure. In other words, inferred Trustee Breyer, a faculty mem- 
ber should know when he or she comes to the University whether 
this is a University wherein 80 percent or 40 percent of the fac- 
ulty gets tenure. 

The President responded that the Board did say in 1973 
that it was going to get more stringent without adopting quotas, 
and that stringency was only now beginning to be felt. If you 
adopt quotas, he pointed out, you face the probability of strength 
ening the movement toward collective bargaining. 



4979 



F&EP Comm. 
5/18/76 



4S80 



F&EP Comm, 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Alfange said he was disturbed by the talk of a quota 
by the Committee. He pointed out that exploration of the idea of 
a quota had been suggested four years ago, and the faculty response 
had been devastating. Their response had been, "I won't bother tq 
commit myself to this University if there is not a realistic change 
of getting tenure. This university is merely a way station and ifl 
I'm going to be looking for a job in seven years, I'm going to cor. 
centrate on my publication list." Junior faculty, in particular, 
began to pull out of Faculty Senate Committees, interdisciplinary 
activities and advising. 



Trustee Breyer said that he was not suggesting that the 
University set a 40 percent quota, but that it decide whether "by 
and large" 40 or 80 percent get tenure. Mr. Alfange responded 
that stringency to a degree of 40 percent would have the same ef- 
fect. Trustee Morgenthau said it would be a mistake for such fac~ 
ulty to suppose that universities consider a person for appoint- 
ment on the publication list alone, apart from collegiality , serv- 
ice to students, etc. She said that, while she did not believe in 
a 40 percent tenured faculty, she believed that much over 60 per- 
cent was dangerous . 

Chairman Troy recalled that discussions of this sort 
had taken place in this Committee before. The Trustees had agree4 
in 1973 on a policy of greater stringency, but he remarked that 
the pressures were enormous. The litigation alone had increased 
dramatically. 

Associate Dean Smith said that the Medical School was 
in a somewhat different position from the Amherst and Boston cam- 
puses. Most of its faculty was young, and would be due for tenure 
decisions at approximately the same time. President Wood said 
that the Medical School was still in an "institution building" 
stage, and that an institution just starting up always had to be 
considered differently. At the same time, a medical faculty al- 
ways had a much larger percentage of part-time faculty and turn- 
over. 



Professor Boelcskevy expressed the view that establish- 
ing a quota would be unfair, because it would put a great burden 
on the persons who had happened to be hired last. Secondly, he 
said the departments were under constant pressure to come up withl 
"neat formulations" which would make unnecessary the kind of indi- 
vidual considerations which had been carried out in this year's 
review. He submitted that it was better to go the individual re- 
view route. The President replied that, while he did not differ 
with Professor Boelcskevy 's statement, he warned of the eventual- 
ity of budget becoming the overriding criterion when the cumulative 
effect of individual decisions is disregarded. Each tenured indi- 
vidual costs the University roughly a million dollars, he pointed 
out . 



I 



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4981 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy commented that, while it might be thought 
cruel by some to deny tenure to an individual, consideration must 
be given to the rights and talents of those outside the walls and 
those coming along behind. Trustee Morgenthau added that if the 
departments carry out their responsibilities, no quota should be 
necessary. 



Trustee Breyer doubted strongly the wisdom of permitting 
a presumption on the part of a faculty that most people can expect 
tenure. Chancellor Bromery called this a difference in philosophy 
he believed that it was healthy for a faculty to have a reasonable 
expectation of tenure. 

After further discussion along similar lines, at 11:25 
a.m. a motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss individual 
tenure cases. 



The executive session ended at 12:30 p.m. 
tions made and seconded, it was 



and upon mo- 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the President's award of tenure to those faculty 
members named in Doc. T76-080A at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, Boston and Worcester. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointments with tenure 
of the persons named in Doc. T76-079 at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Worcester. 

The Committee briefly recessed, and recommenced at 1:00 
p.m. The Committee next took up the proposed Academic Personnel 
Policy (Doc. T76-081) . Mr. Lynton reviewed briefly the history 
of the development of the policy. A Multicampus Academic Person- 
nel Policy Committee had been established in December 1973. The 
Committee had labored in the spring and fall of 1974 to devise a 
draft (T75-125) , which had subsequently been reviewed by the fac- 
ulty governance bodies. While the Amherst faculty had been satis 
fied with the policy in general, the Boston faculty had had seri- 
ous reservations. A compromise had been worked out whereby the 
policy would be adopted by the Board and be reviewed by the Board 
on or before September, 1976. The policy was therefore voted by 
the Board on June 4, 1975. During the current year, the Commit- 
tee had focused on clarifying the issues raised, especially the 
role of the faculty and the administration in personnel decisions 
In this respect the policy was clarified to state that it was the 
responsibility of the faculty to initiate recommendations and of- 
fer convincing evidence in a candidate's favor. The administra- 
tion's responsibility was to review the strength of the evidence 
and recommendations made by the faculty and to base its recommen- 



F&EP Comm. 
5/18/76 



Executive 
Session 



Academic 

Personnel 

Policy 

(Doc. T76-081) 



4982 



F&EP Comm. 
5/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

dations or decisions upon them. 

For the sake of clarity, Mr. Lynton said, it had also 
been decided that a new policy with a new Trustee document number 
would be assembled, rather than to try to laboriously amend the 
old document. However, most of T76-081 consisted of unchanged 
material from T75-125. 

One of the critical issues for the Committee to deal 
with, he said, was a recommendation of the Multicampus Committee 
that the criteria for tenure be changed from the requirement of 
excellence in two of the three criteria (teaching, scholarship 
and service) and strength in the third, to excellence in one of 
the three and strength in the other two. The Multicampus Commit- 
tee had felt, he said, that it would be more reasonable to try to 
enforce this formulation than that of T75-125. This had engender' 
ed much discussion on the campus among faculty and administrators 
as well as in the President's office. The President, he said, be- 
lieved that the previous formulation should be left in place, at 
least for two or three years, before it is changed. Mr. Lynton 
made other comments about specific details of the policy, among 
them the continued presence of the words "rare and compelling" as 
the standard governing Presidential rejections of faculty recom- 
mendations, which he said faculty are comfortable with but which 
counsel finds abhorrent. 

Chairman Troy asked what the policy omitted, and Mr. 
Lynton replied that a lack of time had made necessary the exclu- 
sion of specific provision for grievances, appeals, and part-time 
! faculty. Professor Maki added that the proposed policy dealt with 
; personnel policy in its narrowest sense; it left to governance the 
resolution of the other issues. 

A discussion followed about the issues of excellence in 
one versus two of the tenure criteria. Several Trustees, includ- 
ing the Chairman and Trustee Morgenthau, expressed opposition to 
the dilution of standards for tenure. The Chairman, in particular, 
commented that with the shortened academic calendar, faculty have 
more time than ever before for research and scholarly publication 
Trustee Breyer suggested that such a formulation of excellence in 
one category might enable a person to receive tenure on the basis 
of excellence in committee work and mere strength in teaching and 
scholarship. Professor Zahn remarked that the Multicampus Commit-- 
tee's formulation was actually a return to a previous policy, not 
something entirely new. The Chairman said, however, that he could 
not recall such a formulation in his years on the Board. 

Professor Chavous reminded the Committee of the somewhat 
unconventional composition of the faculties of the UM/Boston Col- 
leges of Public and Community Service (CPCS) and Professional 
Studies. Some of the members of these faculties were not academi- 
cians by experience, and scholarship could not reasonably be ex- 



i 



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4E83 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pected of them. The Chairman remarked that Section 4.9a should 
be interpreted, in the case of these Colleges, so that "profes- 
sional activity" would stand in place of traditional scholarship, 
at least with respect to no n- academicians on the faculty. Speak- 
ing to the language of this section, Trustee Morgenthau objected 
to the formulation, "...creative or professional activity," since 
in her view professional activity should be creative. She sug- 
gested the alternate formulation, "...creative professional activ 
ity." 

A discussion also took place on the procedure by which 
information about a candidate was ascertained, maintained and 
relied upon in personnel decisions. Trustee Breyer asked whether 
it would be possible for an administrator who sees an ambiguous 
letter in a file to make an informal telephone call to the author 
of the letter to seek clarification. According to the policy, 
several present replied, he could do that, but the record and sub- 
stance of the call must be included in the file if the informatioti 
is to be relied upon in a decision. Chancellor Golino added that 
if he were to see some inconsistency in the file, he would ask 
the Vice Chancellor to ask the faculty, at whatever level, to ex- 
ercise its responsibility to resolve this inconsistency; he would 
not do so himself. 

Mr. Lynton remarked that at Boston, unlike most senior 
institutions in his experience, the departmental committee appear^ 
to be regarded as the point of most critical judgement. He sug- 
gested that Trustee Breyer was saying that the higher the level 
of the committee, the more seriously its judgements should be 
taken by the administration. And the less, interposed Trustee 
Morgenthau, the burden that would fall on administrators. Mr. 
Lynton felt that this viewpoint was beginning to evolve. 

Chancellor Bulger asked if he was correct in his under- 
standing that the campuses could not interpret these policies in 
a manner appropriate for their particular situations: "Creative 
or professional activity," for example, meant something different 
to ballerinas than it did to clinicians . The Chairman said he 
believed, however, that the campuses could develop policies conso- 
nant with the general policy. For the record, Mr. Lynton pointed 
out that Section 4.3 did not require uniform campus-wide policies 
a point of concern with some faculty members of Colleges III and 
IV at UM/Boston. In fact, Section 4.3 provides only that the cam- 
puses may develop supplementary policies; it is then up to the 
campuses to provide for differences between schools and colleges. 

Counsel O'Leary expressed his and Counsel Searson's con- 
tinuing concern with the vagueness of the words "rare and compel- 
ling." Chairman Troy replied that the Committee had focused on 
this when it had approved the previous policy and had decided tha 
the words should remain. Mr. Alfange agreed with the wisdom of 
keeping the words, but suggested that the Board take a position 



F&EP Comm. 
5/18/76 



4984 



F&EP Comm. 
5/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to clarify them. Mr. Lynton said that his office had telephoned 
the AAUP to ask whether it had, in fact, a suggested definition 
of the words "rare and compelling." It turned out that it did 
not. The representative did say, however, that the Association 
did not interpret the words to mean that administrators cannot 
make judgements, but only that they should not make capricious 
and arbitrary ones. He suggested that the Multicampus Committee 
study this issue and report to this Committee in the near future 
on a suggested definition. 

Trustee Burack asked that a report of the successes and 
failures of the policy should be made to this Committee in May 
or June of next year. This was agreed. Trustee Breyer added that 
he hoped that such a study would also focus on the role of the 
school or college personnel committee, since it appeared that there 
was a tendency for departmental committees to be too lenient. 
There was no further discussion, and after motion was made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To accept for recommendation to the Executive 
Committee all of the revisions to the current 
Academic Personnel Policy (T75-125) as set forth 
in Trustee Document T76-081 except the proposed 
section 4.9(a) and to substitute therefor the 
text of section 4.10(a) of Trustee Document T75- 
125: 

"Convincing evidence of excellence 
in at least two, and strength in the third, 
of the areas of teaching; of research, 
creative or professional activity; and of 
service, such as to demonstrate the possession 
of qualities appropriate to a member of the 
faculty occupying a permanent position." 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee recommend 
that the Board of Trustees adopt the Academic Per- 
sonnel Policy as set forth in Trustee Document T76- 
081, as amended; further, that Docs. T63-050, T64- 
061 (except for Part II, Articles 5-7), T73-069, 
T75-125 and any other policy, rule or regulation 
incompatible with Doc. T76-081, as amended, be 
rescinded. 



UM/Amherst — 
University 
Without Walls 



The final item was the proposed Establishment of a Uni- 
versity Without Walls at the Amherst campus (Doc. T76-077) . Mr. 
Lynton explained that this program had been given a two-year man- 
(Doc. T76-077) date, subsequently expanded to three years, after which time the 

Faculty Senate was to review it. That review had taken place and 
had yielded the report which was before the Committee. Mr. Lynton 
praised the report and said that the President recommended that 
the program be removed from its temporary status. Trustee Burack 



I 



4985 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

said she had been troubled, when reading the report, to find that 
many of those students who drop out of the program did so because 
of a shortage of faculty sponsors. She asked if there were any 
way to rectify this lack. 

Mr. Harris questioned the statement of the report that 
43 percent of the dropouts from the program could be accounted 
for through lack of a faculty sponsor. He agreed that there had 
been more difficulty in finding faculty sponsors of late, but sug 
gested that this was a function of increased workloads with the 
budget crisis. He said what should be studied was the possibility 
of finding ways to budget in the cost of faculty time. Mr. Lynton 
agreed that this service could no longer be carried as a voluntary 
overload by individuals or as an overload by departments. He 
added, in one context of what had been said earlier about faculty 
willingness to involve themselves in service activity, that this 
was the kind of thing that faculty begin to fall away from if 
tenure criteria became too closely focused on scholarship. Mr. 
Woodbury added the information that a total of 200 faculty mem- 
bers had voluntarily offered their services in this fashion since 
the program began. There was no further discussion and after mo- 
tion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
the University Without Walls at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as described in Doc. T76- 
077. 

There was no other business to come before the Committe 
and the meeting was adjourned at 2:55 p.m. 



F&EP Comm. 
5/18/76 



fyla&yi Keith Hardy • 
Secretary to the Board of Trustee 



4986 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



NOT USED 



I 



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ATTENDANCE: 



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4987 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

May 18, 1976; 3:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shaler; Trustee Cronin 
and Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Mr, 
Mehegan, recorder 

Trustees Absent : Trustees Gordon, McNeil, Morgenthau, Eddy and 
Okin 

Other Trustees : Trustee Conti 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant 
Counsel; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Ms. Gill, Staff Associate; 
Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant for Student Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Fitzpatrick and Mr. Cochrane, Office of 
Residential Life; Ms. Green, Student Affairs Staff 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino ; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

Guests : Ms. Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. 
Martus, Co-President, Amherst Student Government Association; 
Mr. Horowitz, Mr. Starr, Legal Services Office 

The meeting was called to order at 3:35 p.m. Chairman 
Shaler stated at the outset that a large portion of the meeting 
would be devoted to discussion. Turning to the first item, Fee- 
Based Budget at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-056) , he recognized Vice 
President Lynton. 

Mr. Lynton recalled that a review of fee-based budgets 
by this Committee had been the usual procedure over the last cou- 
ple of years. The three matters of especial interest were the 
residence and food service budgets, the Student Activities Trust 
Fund (SATF) and the Legal Services Office, funded from the SATF. 
He went on that the only change in the residence hall and food 
service budgets was an across-the-board, $40 rent increase as an 
interim measure while the campus develops a long-term solution to 
the critical problems of financing the residence halls. Chairman 
Shaler then asked Chancellor Bromery to speak. 

Chancellor Bromery said that it was imperative for the 
campus to discover some way to carry out minimal refurbishment 
and renovation of the residence halls other than by continual rent 



UM/Amherst — 

Fee-Based 

Budget 

(Doc. T76-056) 



4988 



Stu. Affairs 
5/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

increases. Otherwise within five years the rents will be at least 
$200 higher than at present. A second problem beyond that of ren* 
ovations was that of density, particularly in the high-rise dormi- 
tories in Southwest. A study of financing must go hand-in-hand 
with a study of environmental improvements, so that the residence 
halls will not be in the same condition in five years as they are 
in now. whatever decision is reached on a long-range plan, it 
should be reached before the end of the fall 1976 semester, to al- 
low time for implementation. 

One possible solution was to institute some form of gen- 
eral fee which all students would pay, such as is used at the Uni- 
versity of Connecticut. Dr. Gage offered the principle that, 
I since the benefits of the residence halls redound to the entire 
community, there was no reason for them to be supported solely by 
those students who live in them. 

Another possibility that the Chancellor suggested was 
a capital outlay appropriation to pay for a major renovation pro- 
gram. This would require $11-12 million in the next five years. 
The rationale being offered for such an approrpiation was that th£ 
students pay for the debt service and normal maintenance through 
their rents, but they should not be obligated to pay for major 
renovations, since the buildings will become the property of the 
Commonwealth. The proposed $40 increase in rent would not solve 
anything; it was only a stop-gap measure. He added that the in- 
crease was $25 less than that originally contemplated by the cam- 
pus. The reduction was intended to fulfill his commitment to the 
students that funds transferred from the residence hall trust fund 
for the purchase of Project 14 would not come out of the pockets 
of the students. 



The Chancellor briefly outlined an unofficial idea which 
he had developed for upkeep of the residence halls. If the Uni- 
versity could receive half of the revenue raised by the tuition 
increase over the next three years, rather than having it go to 
the General Fund, it would provide $13 million. This way, the 
money which students contribute would be used for the renovation 
of state property. He said he dreaded tying the budget to tuition, 
but he felt something had to be done about the residence halls. 
If capital outlay was to be the solution, he added, it would need 
to be enacted in the legislative session. 

He concluded that he believed that such an appropriation 
would be a possibility if it had the Secretary's and the Governor rs 
support. Chairman Shaler asked Miss Tehan to convey to Secretary 
Parks the Committee's hope that the Secretary could be of some 
help in this problem. 

Trustee Cronin recapitulated the contents of a memoran- 
dum which the Student Government Association had transmitted to 
the Chancellor on this matter. Among the statements in that memo- 



s 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

randum was that any rent increase should be reduced by an amount 
equal to the transfer of $364,000 from the Residence Hall Trust 
Fund approved by the Board on April 7 . He recalled that the 
Chancellor had earlier proposed a $70 rent increase, and that a 
reduction in this figure to compensate for the transfer would be 
$35, leaving a rent increase of $35. He suggested that an archi- 
tect might find ways to improve the conditions in Southwest. A 
management consultant might also work with the Office of Residen- 
tial Life and Physical Plant in the area of maintenance and work 
orders so that these offices would have a performance index to worl 
against and be able to evaluate their own work. On the subject 
of stop-gap rent increases, he said he hoped that the architectural 
and management study could develop a four- or five-year program 
so that students will know when they enter the University what 
cost escalations are likely. Chancellor Bromery revealed that a 
management audit team was being put together at present. But no 
matter who audits the residence halls, he said, if rent is the 
only means of support, the auditor would recommend a $100 increasje. 
This was why some other means of support was the only way out of 
continuing rent increases. 

Mr. Martus repeated some of the points made by Mr. Cro- 
nin, and said that some study should be done to determine the 
true cost of the residence hall system, and to establish the real 
priorities. It seemed irrational to him to state that $11-12 mil- 
lion was needed before the priorities had been established by sucp 
a study. 

Mr. Lynton agreed that there was not enough available 
information on priorities and real costs to make possible at this 
time a four- or five-year projection of needs. The immediate 
question was, what are the immediate needs and how far will $45 
go to meet these? Chancellor Bromery responded that this was 
exactly what had been done ever since he had become Chancellor: 
passing rent increases year by year to take care of the immediate 
needs without looking down the road. The information he had pro- 
vided was not for the purpose of a Trustee vote at this time on 
a long-range plan, but to make certain that everybody understood 
that when this increase is voted, all it would do is "give us 
three steps past the last stumble." He believed, he said, that 
the need for a long-range program was germane to a $45 increase. 

To further substantiate Chancellor Bromery 's remarks, 
Dr. Gage unveiled a series of graphs to illustrate the cost esca- 
lation in the residence hall system over the past several years. 
A discussion ensued also about the cost of vandalism to students. 
The point was made that the cost of repairs comes out of the pock^ 
ets of other students; it is not paid for by the administration 
or the Commonwealth. 

One student charged that the administration was trying 
to ram this increase through while the students were away for the 



4989 



Stu. Affairs 
5/18/76 



4990 



Stu. Affairs 
5/18/76 



UM/ Amherst — 
Student Affairs 
Trust Fund 
(SATF) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Legal Services 
Office 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

summer. He said the administration had not discussed these issued 
with the general student population, but only with the co-presi- 
dents. Chancellor Bromery responded that it was difficult to negc 
tiate and discuss with the students when the Student Government 
Association had dismantled the Rents and Fees Committee, which 
would have been the normal vehicle for such discussions. 

Chairman Shaler said it was the hope of the Committee 
that the cost of supporting the residence hall system could be 
removed from the hands of the students. He asked that the campus 
provide a report on its long-range plans in the fall. 

The Committee turned next to the subject of the Student 
Affairs Trust Fund. Chancellor Bromery began the discussion by 
saying that he was not at all concerned about the relative apathy 
on the part of students where the actions of the Student Govern- 
ment was concerned. He said that if some students choose not to 
exercise their option, that is their privilege. What he was con- 
cerned about was that the administration of the SATF conform to 
the accounting standards applied to the rest of the University. 



Trustee Callahan asked whether the Trustees had the same 
fiscal responsibilities with respect to this trust fund as they 
had for the others under their supervision, and Mrs. Hanson replied 
that they did. However, she pointed out, this trust fund was ac- 
counted differently. She then asked the students whether there is 
any outside auditing done, and they replied that they did their 
own auditing. 

Chancellor Bromery pointed out that, of the $1 million 
SATF budget, $650,000 goes to support wages, salaries and contracts 
The campus must be able to assure the Trustees that University 
standards for grants and contracts and for accounting generally 
are observed. It is in the students' interest that this be done, 
he said. Mr. Lynton added that no one was questioning the right 
of the students to budget this money as they see fit; the question 
was one of the representativeness of the small group of students 
making decisions. One student, responding to a question about 
compliance of the SATF with federal affirmative action guidelines 
explained that the students had their own affirmative action plan 
Chancellor Bromery stated, however, that it was not enough for 
the students to satisfy themselves that they were carrying out 
their responsibilities; they must satisfy the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare. 

Chairman Shaler then introduced the required review of 
the Legal Services Office, funded by the SATF. The mandate of 
this office to represent students in criminal matters and in liti- 
gation against the University was to expire June 30, and the Office 
had been required to report on its first year of such activities 
for this mandate to be continued. Chairman Shaler and Vice Pres-| 
ident Lynton praised the report which had been submitted, and after 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : Upon review of the authorization granted to 

attorneys in the Student Legal Services Office 
to represent students in criminal matters and 
in litigation against the University, as pro- 
vided by vote of the Board of Trustees on October 
1, 1975, to recommend that the Board of Trustees 
confirm such authorization. 

The Committee next took up the Fee-Based Budget of UM/ 
Boston (Doc. T76-086) . Chancellor Golino explained some of the 
figures in the information submitted. He said the campus could 
account for every cent spent by the Student Affairs Committee 
Trust Fund, and said he could give assurances that funds were be- 
ing expended within the law and with University accounting stand- 
ards. There was no discussion. 

The next matter was the proposed continuation of the 
Residence Halls and Dining Commons Policy at UM/ Amherst (Doc. T76 
078) . Chancellor Bromery said that such an extension was needed 
until such time as the campus could put forth the long-range pro 
gram discussed earlier. Trustee Cronin agreed that the extension 
was necessary, but said the improvements mentioned earlier might 
serve to entice students to live in the residence halls voluntar- 
ily. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees extend for 
one year, beginning September 1, 1976, the provi- 
sions of its vote of June 4, 1975 with respect to 
on-campus residency of undergraduate students at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees extend for 
one year, beginning September 1, 1976, the provi- 
sions of its vote of June 4, 1975 with respect to 
use of dining commons by undergraduate students at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

The final item on the agenda was a report from the Stu- 
dent Affairs Division of the Boston campus. Chairman Shaler said 
he had read the report carefully and been disappointed by it. He 
described it as bland, and lacking any kind of long-range goals. 
It was no different from the report made more than a year ago, he 
said. 

Chancellor Golino said he believed that the campus had 
achieved a great deal in student affairs in the last year, consid 
ering the magnitude of the budget reductions. The Chairman disa- 
greed, and said the report showed more interest in mechanisms than 
in a commitment to a specific philosophy to student services, suci 
as an outreach approach to student affairs. He asked for a revised 



4991 



Stu. Affairs 
5/18/76 



UM/Boston — 

Fee-Based 

Budget 

(Doc. T76-086) 



UM/ Amherst — 

Residence Halls 

and Dining 

Commons 

(Doc. T76-078) 



UM/Boston- 
Report on 
Student 
Affairs 






4992 



Stu. Affairs 
5/18/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

report to be made at the next meeting of the Committee which in- 
cluded a clear statement of goals with respect to student affairs 

Chancellor Golino said he would do so, and emphasized 
that there seemed to be a problem in communication, and that he 
had sincerely endeavored to provide all the information which had 
been asked by the Committee. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 6:30 p.m. 



d&ladyf Keith Hardy • 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



I 



ATTENDANCE: 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

May 19, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Conti, Croce, Rowland, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer 
Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Dennis, Gordon and Shearer 

Other Trustees : Mr. Callahan, representing Trustee Anrig 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Managemen 
and Business Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Cahill, Staff Assistant, Student Affairs; Ms. Frankel, Staff As- 
sistant, Management and Business Affairs; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assist 
ant, Budget Office; Mr. Brunell, Student Intern 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Camerino, Office 
of Grants and Contracts; Mr. Hogan, Assistant Controller; Messrs. 
Cochrane, Fitzpatrick, Ganguli and West, Office of Residential 
Life 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Cathey, Controller 

Guests : Ms. Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs; Mr. 
Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Counsel; Messrs. Doyle, 
Federow, Horowitz, Martus, O'Keefe, Pill, Ms. Gavin, Ms. Gutten- 
berg and Ms. Smith, UM/Amherst; Mr. Kirstein, UM/Boston 

The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson, who asked Chancellor Golino to introduce the newly 
elected faculty representative from the Boston campus. Chancellor 
Golino expressed his pleasure in having the opportunity to intro- 
duce Professor Andrew Boelcskevy of the College I German Depart- 
ment . 

Chairman Carlson then asked Mr. John Wood, of Standish, 
Ayer & Wood, Investment Counsel, to report on the status of the 
University Endowment fund. Mr. Wood reported that the stock posi- 
tions had been reduced from 65.8 to 63.0 percent and the average 
maturity of the bonds had been reduced from 13.7 to 11.8 years in 
accordance with discussion at the April 20 meeting of the Commit- 
tee. He circulated to the Committee updated economic projections 



4993 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



4994 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 



Purchase of 
Property at 
Hodgkins Cove 
(Doc. T76-083) 



H.T.U. Smith 
Memorial Geol- 
ogy Endowment 
Fund 
(Doc. T76-084) 



Status Report 


on Grants and 


Contract Ad- 


ministration 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

calling attention to the substantial increase in business invento- 
ries as indicated in the GNP report. He said that there would be 
no revision to the forecast of Investment Counsel at this time; 
however, if the figures in the GNP report hold up, a revised fore- 
cast would be forthcoming at a later date. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Treasurer Johnson to report 
on the status of the property at Hodgkins Cove, Gloucester. Treas 
urer Johnson said that the University of Massachusetts Foundation 
had taken the necessary actions to convey the property to the Uni^ 
versity. The land has been appraised at $225,000. The cost to 
the University will be the balance of the mortgage, approximately 
$32,366, and the cost of the legal work involved, around $500. 
Secretary Buckley has authorized the State Comptroller to allocate 
$35,000 for the purchase of this land. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Treasurer Johnson to address 

I 

the next item on the agenda, the H.T.U. Smith Memorial Geology 
Endowment Fund (Doc. T76-084) . Treasurer Johnson said that H.T.U. 
Smith had been a professor at UM/Amherst and the head of the geol- 
ogy department. Chancellor Bromery added that he was considered 
to be the world expert on sand dunes (migration of sands in deserts) 
He had been killed in an accident about five years ago. Upon mo- 
tion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend acceptance of the H.T.U. Smith Memorial 
Geology Award, in the amount of $3,352.50, as an 
Endowment Fund for the purpose of making one or more 
awards annually from income earned during the preced- 
ing fiscal year to undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents (including freshmen and graduating seniors) 
regularly enrolled at the University of Massachusetts 
Amherst Campus. Awards shall be for tuition, fees, 
research and to defray expenses in connection with 
geological field work. Selection of recipients shal!. 
be made by a faculty committee appointed by the Chair- 
person of the Geology/Geography Department; said com- 
mittee shall determine the number and amount of 
awards which shall be made to students majoring in 
Geology on the basis of scholastic achievement and 
merit of research project. Income may be carried 
forward from year to year or returned to principal 
at the direction of the committee. 



Chairman Carlson turned next to the Status Report on 
Grants and Contract Administration , noting that members of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy had also received the 
report and had been invited to join the Budget and Finance Commit 
tee to hear Mr. Janis's explanation of the organizational pattern 
being evolved for the area. Mr. Janis said a review of grants 
and contract administration had been initiated as a result of the 
problems at the School of Education — UM/Amherst. He added that 



I 



I 



I 



4395 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the charge to the President from the Committee on Budget and Fi- 
nance at their February meeting was specifically to report on the 
status of the Coopers & Lybrand audit of the School of Education. 
He said that he would discuss this report briefly and summarize 
the major recommendations. He would then do the same for both 
the Hay report and the HEW audit. He hoped to show 1) the inter- 
relationship of the three reports, 2) how business functions or 
subsystems were being reorganized to provide an accountability 
structure, and 3) the extent of centralization and decentralization 
involved in these functions. He said that Coopers & Lybrand had 
indicated in their report that there were weaknesses in other 
areas as well as in the administration of grants and contracts. 
Certain controls were lacking and there was need for an account- 
ability structure. 

He then outlined the four major recommendations of the 
Coopers & Lybrand report as follows: 

1) Each campus should have an Office of Grants and 
Contracts Administration and this office should 
report to the Vice Chancellor for Administration 
and Finance on that campus . 

2) There should be more active review by department 
heads and others during the proposal stage of a 
proposed grant, or contract. 

3) Numerous strong and specific steps should be taken 
to strengthen business subsystems for processing 
of transactions. 

4) A new position of Vice President for Management and 
Business Affairs should be established forthwith. 
This person should be concerned with formulation 
and recommendation of policy, design of uniform 
systems and procedures, and overall direction of 
the business area. 

Mr. Janis then summarized the Hay Associates report, 
which he said was essentially a management report. It deals with 
the administrative and business aspects of the University and not 
with academic functions. He said that it recognizes the fact 
that the teaching, research and service functions are the primary 
mission of any university and that the administrative function 
should support and enhance that role. The Hay report also deals 
with executive level compensation and makes important recommenda- 
tions in that area. It deals also with the organizational struc 
ture of the University in the business and finance area, particu- 
larly with the lead agent concept and generally with the relation 
ship and role of the President's Office vis a vis the administra- 
tive functions on the campuses. 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 



4996 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Janis explained a key concept contained in the Hay 
Report by means of a chart which depicted the stages of adminis- 
trative policy as follows: 

1) Policy conceptualization. 

2) Policy development and guidelines for implementation 

3) Program implementation (development of procedures) . 

4) Evaluation feedback. 

He said that the Hay Report cautioned against the dange 
of drawing a hard line between policy development and program im- 
plementation, thus resulting in the first becoming exclusively a 
central office function, and the second becoming solely a campus 
responsibility. The report stressed the need for a flow in both 
directions — that is, central office concerns with implementation 
and campus involvement in policy formulation. 

The HEW audit, Mr. Janis said, dealt essentially with 
the School of Education and other units at the Amherst campus. 
Since the report was still in draft form and the campus had not 
yet had time to respond to the questions raised by the audit, he 
said, he could not discuss it except to say that the draft report 
contained no indication of fraud or theft. All contracts were 
performed well; everyone had been satisfied with the results. 
The questions raised all concerned questionable procedures or in- 
adequate justifications which HEW felt had occurred. Mr. Janis 
said that the University could probably justify many of the rec- 
ommended disallowances by HEW. One of the most important findings 
resulting from the HEW audit, he said, was that the controls that 
are applied by the University to state funds must also be applied 
by the University to federally-supported projects and, with Trus- 
tee mandate and support, to other nonstate trust funds, fee-based 
budgets, etc. 

The thread which ran through all of the reports indi- 
cated that: 

1) Business subsystems must be strengthened. 

2) Controls must be extended. 

3) Increased policy direction must be provided from 
the President's Office. 

Mr. Janis then turned to the Status Report on Grants 
and Contract Administration which had been forwarded to the Com- 
mittee. The report, he said, was divided into three sections. 
The first part dealt with the status of the implementation of the 
Coopers & Lybrand report. The second was a chronology of the 



I 



I 



I 



4897 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

events that had occurred and the steps that had been taken by the 
President since the School of Education problem first came to 
light through to the present time. The third section consisted 
of backup data from the campuses indicating the specific actions 
they had taken related to the areas of concern expressed by Coopers 
& Lybrand, particularly those dealing with grants and contracts. 

Mr. Janis then explained with the aid of a chart the 
evolving business subsystems being developed to provide account- 
ability. He also indicated the relative degree of centralization 
and decentralization of the various subsystems, beginning with th 
Administrative Data Processing Center (the most centralized opera 
tion) , through internal auditing, accounting, grants and contract 
administration, purchasing, labor relations, management and organs 
ization, budget and ending with the auxiliary enterprises, which 
is the most decentralized of the areas. Mr. Janis said that the 
Board of Trustees had mandated the strengthening of the auditing 
function, particularly by the use of outside auditing firms. Re- 
garding management and organization, he said, the University was 
highly decentralized, with the campuses responsible for developing 
their own management systems. There is, however, an Organization 
Design Review Committee, which was established by the Board of 
Trustees in June 1975, (to review organizational relationships to 
a rational structure among the top executives in the system.) 
The budget area, he said, is highly decentralized. By improving 
the interface among accounting, budgeting and auxiliary enterprises, 
Mr. Janis said, he hoped to provide more accountability in this 
area. 

President Wood emphasized the importance of sound man- 
agement in the overall operation of the University. He added tha 
the Governor's Management Task Force report, which was just issue I, 
had cited the Amherst campus for its efficient operation. He saia 
that in the current economic situation, efficiency in operation 
was not only highly desirable but absolutely essential. 



Trustee Troy asked what the implementation of these 
organizational patterns and controls would mean in terms of man- 
power. Mr. Janis replied that it probably would require the addi- 
tion of three or four people to the Office of Management and Busi 
ness Affairs and would require additional personnel on the cam- 
puses, but that it would not result in a major growth in staff. 
President Wood reminded the Committee that the position of the 
Vice President for Management and Business Affairs was not an ad- 
ditional position, but simply a redesignation of an area of empha 
sis from the earlier need for the position of Vice President for 
Policy, held by Peter Edelman, to the current need for control 
capability in management and business affairs. Chairman Carlson 
thanked Mr. Janis for his report. 

Chairman Carlson next turned to the matter of the Audit 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 



of Campus Center and Division of Continuing Education — UM/ Amherst 



4998 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 

UM/Amherst — 
Audit of Cam- 
pus Center and 
Division of 
Continuing 
Education 
(Doc. T76-088) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(Doc. T76-088) . Mr. Janis explained that because of the magnitude 
of the revenue-based operations on the UM/Amherst campus, Chancel- 
lor Bromery had proposed that an annual external financial audit 
be made. This, he said, was in accordance with the vote of the 
Board of Trustees in June 1975 and it was hoped that such external 
audits would assist the campus and University administration in 
making management decisions. Mr. Janis said that should this ap- 
proach for these two activities prove successful, external audits 
of other activities would probably go forward. Because of its 
experience in the field of university auditing, the firm of Peat, 
Marwick, Mithcell & Co. had been proposed for this initial effort, 
Since the cost of the audit would exceed the authority of current 
delegations, approval for the audit was being requested of the 
Committee on Budget and Finance and the full Board of Trustees. 
In response to a query from Trustee Cronin, Chancellor Bromery 
said that the cost of the audit would be borne by the activity be-- 
ing audited; and, in the case of the Campus Center, would be paid 
for by student fees, but he emphasized that it would be money weli. 
spent. There being no further discussion, on motion made and sec- 
onded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the President to take the necessary 
steps to engage Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 
to perform an annual audit of the Campus Center 
and the Division of Continuing Education, such 
contract not to exceed $25,000 plus documented 
out-of-pocket expenses. 

Chairman Carlson next turned to the subject of the fee- 
based budgets, informing the Committee that at the meeting of the 
Committee on Student Affairs the previous day, there had been a 
long discussion on the residential hall rent increase and the mat- 
ter of deferred maintenance of the buildings. Since rent increases 
to alleviate this problem were at best stop-gap measures, he said 
Trustee Shaler, Chairman of the Committee on Student Affairs, fol- 
lowing Chancellor Bromery' s suggestion, had requested that the 
Amherst administration present to that Committee in the fall a 
long-range plan for dealing with the total cost and schedules of 
needed repairs, as well as the continued maintenance of the resi- 
dence halls. However, since this matter had been thoroughly re- 
viewed by that committee and on the campus, Chairman Carlson said 
there was no need at this time for the Committee on Budget and 
Finance to hold further discussion at this meeting. President 
Wood added that this Committee needed to be concerned with the 
process of the development of the fees, rather than with the amount 
of the fee involved. He said that the Committee and the adminis- 
tration must rely on the advice of the campus as to the magnitude 
of the fees. 



Chairman Carlson said that the Committee on Student Af- 
fairs had also discussed the Student Legal Services Office and 



I 



I 



I 



1 



4999 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS B&F Coram. 

5/19/76 
had agreed that the services it provides to students are proper 
The Committee had, therefore, voted to recommend that the limited 
mandate given to the Student Legal Services Office last fall be 
renewed. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Mrs. Hanson, Budget Directojr, UM/Amherst — 
to comment on the new fees requested by the Amherst campus as set New Fees 
forth in Doc. T76-085. Mrs. Hanson said that three of these fees] (Doc. T76-085) 
had been deferred at the time of the last meeting to allow for 
further legal review, which had now been completed. 

The first, she said, concerned the establishment of a New York 
Trust fund and a fee to cover the cost of the New York Outreach Outreach 
Program, a program in which student interns are able to partici- Program 
pate in art-related institutions in New York. It is less expensive 
for the University to provide a living facility for students in 
the Outreach program than for them to find their own accommodations. 
The fee covers the cost of the facility, administrative and postage 
expenses, and transportation costs for the Outreach staff. In 
response to a question from Trustee Troy, Mrs. Hanson said that 
this program is similar to the program in Washington, D.C., as 
well as to the various overseas programs . 






The second fee under consideration, she said, was a 
Late Registration Fee. This is actually a request for an increas< 
in the current fee from $5 to $25. The purpose of the proposed 
increase is to encourage students to register at an earlier date. 
The fee increase should encourage a reduction of the number of 
late registrants, thus reducing the cost in the registrar's office 
for temporary help needed to handle large numbers of late regis- 
trants. The increase in this fee, although punitive for the of- 
fender who does not register in the specified period, is not in- 
tended to penalize so much as to discourage lateness. In any 
case, the additional revenues collected from this fee increase 
must go to the Commonwealth and therefore would not enable staff 
increases for that office. It was suggested by Treasurer Johnson 
that the vote contain a provision to allow for discretionary waiv- 
ers of the fee. 



The third item, Mrs. Hanson explained, would establish 
a Trust fund and charge for Research Services provided by the 
University. This is a users' fee which would cover the cost of 
glass, chemical and electronic laboratory services, standard 
procedure at universities. 

There being no further discussion of the foregoing pro- 
posed trust funds and fees, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that, effective July 1, 1976, the 
New York Outreach Trust Fund be established. 



Late Registra- 
tion 



Research 
Services 



5000 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 



Residence 
Hall Rent 
Increase 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that, effective July 1, 1976, the fee 
of $350 ($273 for rent and $77 for program costs) 
for the New York Outreach Trust Fund be established, 

VOTED : To recommend that, effective July 1, 1976, the 
charge for Late Registration and/or Payment be 
established at $25.00 per student, said fees to 
be remitted to the Commonwealth, and the Chancellor 
or his designee be authorized to waive this fee in 
individual cases of unusual or extenuating circum- 
stances . 

VOTED : To recommend that effective July 1, 1976, the 
Research Council Services Fund be established. 
The purpose of the Trust Fund will be to support 
the glass, chemical, electronic and other research 
services available to faculty and students engaged 
in sponsored and unsponsored research and to act as 
the depository for revenue generated from such serv- 
ices. 

VOTED : To recommend that, effective July 1, 1976, the 

fee schedule as detailed on p. III. 71 of Section 
III of Doc. T76-056 be established for the Research 
Council Services Fund. 



Chairman Carlson then turned to the proposed increase 
! in room rents. This is the item, he said, which was discussed ex- 
tensively at the Student Affairs meeting the previous day. Trus- 
tee Cronin asked for clarification as to how the $45 increase was 
determined. Chancellor Bromery explained that this is the amount 
in addition to money from the operating budget which would be nec- 
essary in order to make the necessary short-term renovations and 
repairs to the residence halls. This money would replace the 
money transferred from the Residence Hall Trust Fund for the pur- 
chase of Fraternity/Sorority Park. The cost of the renovations 
would amount to considerably more than the fees collected, but 
the $45 increase would be used to assist in paying for renovations, 
some of which have been mandated as a result of the suit brought 
against the University by a group of students. Chancellor Bromery 
said Student Affairs personnel, the Student Government Association 
and the residence hall governance bodies need to make it understood 
by students that any damage to residence halls will result in in- 
creased maintenance and renovation costs for which they must pay. 
He said that the campus would be working through the summer to 
develop long-range financial solutions and plans for the mainte- 
nance and renovation problems of the residence halls. 

President Wood said entering students should be advised 
of multi-year fee schedules so that they can anticipate and plan 
their finances. He also stated that, since repairs had been de- 
layed during the last several years because of the limited funds 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

available, physical conditions were such that postponement of re- 
pairs and renovations cannot continue and it would be necessary 
now to invest money in the residence halls. 

Trustee Croce asked if the residence buildings were in- 
sured. Treasurer Johnson replied that the dormitories which are 
owned by the Building Authority and the Building Association are 
insured, but those owned by the state are not. However, he said, 
as the debt service is paid off in the next few years, the Univer 
sity can look forward to money becoming available for other uses, 
such as maintenance. 

Trustee Cronin said that the Student Government Associa 
tion had sent a memorandum to Vice Chancellor Gage, asking that 
the rent increase be put to specific uses. Some of these propos- 
als had been incorporated into Chancellor Bromery's memorandum, 
he said, and others had not. Since this matter had been thorough 
ly discussed at the Student Affairs meeting, it was the sense of 
the Committee that further discussion was not warranted by the 
Committee on Budget and Finance. It was then moved, seconded and 



VOTED: 



[ 



To recommend that, if adopted by the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority, the following 
per occupant charges reflecting a $45.00 increase 
in all projects be approved, effective September 1, 
1976: 



Project 

Project I 
Projects II, IV, 

VI, VIII, X 
Project XII 



Annual 
Charge 

$690.00 

$750.00 
$770.00 



Semester 
Charge 

$345.00 

$375.00 
$385.00 



VOTED: 



To recommend that effective September 1, 1976, the 
following charges be established for student accom- 
modations in dormitories in the Residence Hall Trust 
Fund: 



Condition 

Renovated 
Unrenovated 



Annual 
Charge 

$750.00 
$690.00 



Semester 
Charge 

$375.00 
$345.00 



Trustee Conti was recorded in opposition to the above 



votes 



1 



Chairman Carlson then turned to the matter of the fee- 
based budgets for FY 1977. 



5001 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 



5002 



B&F Comm. 
5/19/76 

UM/ Worcester — 

Fee-based 

Budget 

(Doc. T76-087) 



UM/Boston — 

Fee-based 

Budget 

(Doc. T76-086) 



UM/Amherst — 

Fee-based 

Budget 

(Doc. T76-056) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Cathey reported briefly on the FY 1977 Fee-based 
Budget — UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-087) . He said the Health Fee and 
the Equipment Fee are just now starting to show activity since 
the University Hospital is now handling the health service, and 
the equipment is now experiencing more wear and tear as a result 
of the increased usage. He said that money lent to the Student 
Housing Trust Fund is now in the process of being repaid. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fees as set forth in the FY 1977 Fee-based 
Budget, UM/Worcester, dated May, 1976 (Doc. T76- 
087). 

Chancellor Golino reported that the FY 1977 Fee-based 
Budget — UM/Boston (Doc. T76-086) contained only one new fee, for 
the fee-assisted summer program, which had been approved at an 
earlier meeting. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fees as set forth in the FY 1977 Fee-based 
Budget, UM/Boston, dated May, 1976 (Doc. T76- 
086). 

Chancellor Bromery reported that the FY 1977 Revenue- 
based Budget — UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-056) contained for the most 
part on-going fees, and that the new fees and fee increases had 
already been discussed and approved by the Committee. He called 
the attention of the Committee to the SATF tax, which had been 
discussed at the Student Affairs meeting. He stated his concern 
that with the rapidly growing portion of the SATF tax being used 
to pay student and nonstudent salaries and consultation fees, 
hiring practices be in compliance with University policies and 
state and federal affirmative action guidelines. He added that 
plans were being made to have the activities supported by the 
SATF tax comply with the accounting and auditing practices of 
the regular University accounting system. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

the fees as set forth in the FY 1977 Revenue-based 
Budget, University of Massachusetts, Amherst cam- 
pus, dated June 1976 (Doc. T76-056) . 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 11:45 a.m. 



AladysP Keith Hardy • 



I 



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Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



ATTENDANCE : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

May 19, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Rowland; President Wood 
Trustees Breyer, Carlson, Clark; Mr. Callahan representing Trusted 
Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Committee Members Absent : Trustees Conti and Spiller 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mr. Richard Bru- 
nell, student intern, Office of the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative 

Guests : Professor James Ackerman, Chairman, Advisory Council on 
the Fine Arts; Mr. John Hite, student, UM/Amherst; Mr. Milton Kir- 
stein, Student Trustee staff, UM/Boston 

Chairman Rowland called the meeting to order at 2:00 p. in 
She said that the agenda would be taken up in reverse order so 
that Professor Ackerman could comment on the Draft Report of the 
Advisory Council on the Fine Arts before the Committee opened dis- 
cussion on continuing education programs. 

Chairman Rowland commented that the Advisory Council 
had been established by the Board of Trustees in February 1974, 
upon the recommendation of the Committee on Long-Range Planning. 
She then read the charge to the Council. She said the draft re- 
port of the Advisory Council would be available in the near futur 
and at the August meeting of the Committee, the report would be 
discussed and members would be asked to consider the University's 
long-range commitment to the arts. 

At Chairman Rowland's request, President Wood commented 
He thanked Professor Ackerman for the work done by the Council in 
identifying key issues, such as the need for congruity between 
faculties and activities and in identifying differences between 
the Amherst and Boston campuses. 

Mrs. Robinson added that UM/Boston is now at a critical 
stage in planning for the arts. Site studies are under way for 
the new arts and sciences building and a possible relationship with 



5003 



Advisory 
Council on 
the Fine Arts 



5004 



LRP Comm. 
5/19/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Massachusetts College of Art has been proposed. 

Mr. Cooley stated his concern about the size of the in- 
vestment necessary to mount an outstanding arts program and suggest 
ed that ways be explored for obtaining funding from sources exter- 
nal to the University, as well as determining the revenue that 
could be generated through performances. He also suggested explor 
ing cooperative and exchange programs with other resources in the 
vicinity of UM/ Amherst such as Tanglewood, the Saratoga Performing 
Arts Center and the new College of Dramatic and Performing Arts 
in Purchase, New York. 

Chairman Rowland then asked Professor Ackerman to sum- 
marize the conclusions of the Advisory Council. 

Professor Ackerman said that the introduction to the 
draft report which had been circulated to the Committee contained 
the major issues addressed by the Council. He said that each sub- 
committee would submit its own report and make recommendations in 
its particular field of expertise. 



The Advisory Council, he said, had found a great imbal- 
ance between UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston, not in quality of faculty, 
but in funds invested. The program at Boston, he said, was gross- 
ly underfunded. Faculty members carry extremely heavy teaching 
loads, and the breadth of the programs is so thin that graduates 
from the programs would find it difficult to get into graduate 
school. The program in Theater was particularly weak. 

At UM/Amherst, he said, the drift is away from liberal 
arts toward specialization. Art programs are under pressure to 
admit more people. The council suggests that a ceiling be put on 
majors in the specialized degree programs. Limiting enrollment 
in specialized programs would make it possible to encourage stu- 
dents in other programs with an interest in the arts to take the 
more general arts courses. 



Professor Ackerman said that the departments of music 
and dance at UM/Amherst have been successful in advertising their 
accomplishments by performing for the public. The Five-College 
programs are working well. There is a need for scholarships or 
tuition waivers for exceptionally talented students in the arts 
since the capacity to recruit and keep outstanding artists upgrad 
the whole institution. In the current budget situation, the Coun- 
cil saw little possibility for the development of cooperative pro- 
grams between UM/Amherst and UM/Boston. 



The most urgent problem at UM/Amherst, Professor Acker- 
man said, was improvement in the organization and coordination of 
the activities for the Fine Arts Center. A study of these prob- 
lems should be undertaken and from it should come a clarification 
of authority and organization. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The program at UM/Boston is quite distinct from that at 
UM/Amherst, as it should be, he said. It would be interesting, 
he added, to compare expenditures per student at the two campuses 
The Council suggests that the arts building at UM/Boston should 
be constructed to provide maximum flexibility. The Council would 
like to see the arts programs extended to evenings and the summer 
and to see the library open for longer periods. They suggest 
greater use of part-time faculty from the professional ranks of 
various art fields. 



Professor Ackerman thought it might prove helpful if the 
Council's report could be circulated to administrative officers, 
deans and department heads on the campuses as well as to the Long- 
Range Planning Committee. 

President Wood agreed that wide circulation of the re- 
port by the Council would allow campus personnel to reflect over 
the summer on its conclusions and recommendations and be in a 
position to react to it in the fall. 

Chairman Rowland asked Committee members to respond to 
Professor Ackerman 's report. 

Trustee Carlson commented on the Council's statement 
that the Fine Arts Center was not administratively or physically 
conducive to smooth operation. He expressed the opinion that the 
design of the building was not so much the problem and asked if 
a reorganization which could identify clear lines of authority 
would not alleviate this situation. Professor Ackerman replied 
that the design of the building could tend to either divide or 
pull together the various programs. Chancellor Bromery added 
that interdisciplinary programs were needed. 

In response to a query with regard to the value of the 
professional performances versus educational activities, Profes- 
sor Ackerman said, there was a need for balance so that one com- 
plements the other to the best interests of both. 

Chancellor Golino said that he agreed with Professor 
Ackerman that arts programs at UM/Boston were inadequate. He 
said the faculty is overworked and underfunded, and relief is 
needed. He would welcome a mandate from the Trustees to move to 
establish more arts programs. He asked Professor Ackerman how he 
perceived a center for the arts at UM/Boston. Professor Ackerman 
replied that he would suggest a building that is flexible as to 
the activities it can house supplemented by possible use of facil- 
ities in the surrounding communities, such as unused warehouses, 
and the development of cooperative programs. Trustee Clark sug- 
gested that the Strand Theater might be a part of such a program. 

President Wood said that whereas UM/Boston had the capa 
ity to modify physical plans for the arts, UM/Amherst did not. 



LRP Comm, 
5/19/76 



5006 



LRP Comm. 
5/19/76 



Continuing 
Education 
Programs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Clark asked whether the Committee on Long-Range Planning 
would merely vote to accept the report of the Council or would us£ 
it as the basis for developing a statement of long-range policy. 
Chairman Rowland replied that she would ask the Committee to rec- 
ommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm its commitment to the 
arts and approve a statement outlining future directions for the 
campuses in the arts. 



President Wood commented that the Committee up to now 
has dealt with fixing magnitudes in its policies for enrollments 
at the two campuses. It has not as yet considered issues which 
link the effect of a capital budget on the operating budget. 
Fine arts, he said, is an area of increasing student interest, 
and although there has been money in the capital budgets for the 
arts, commensurate operating funds have not been adequate for the 
support of programs in the arts. He added that in the present 
budget and fiscal situation, it is no longer possible to say: 
This is what you want, give me the money and I will do it. For 
every new program offered, something else must be curtailed. 

Chairman Rowland asked Mr. Gulko if it would be possibl 
to obtain the costs which are associated with the various types 
of art programs. Upon receiving an affirmative reply, she asked 
that the Amherst campus begin to develop such figures for the use 
of the Committee on Long-Range Planning in studying relative pri- 
orities. Trustee Clark asked if the ticket sales provided enough 
revenue to be a major consideration. Chancellor Bromery replied 
that they did not. Professor Ackerman added that one way of ob- 
taining revenue was to conduct special summer workshops and other 
such activities. He concluded by emphasizing that the Council 
was particularly concerned that interaction take place among the 
arts . 

Chairman Rowland thanked Professor Ackerman for his re- 
port, saying the Committee would look forward to receiving the 
formal report of the Council. 

Chairman Rowland then turned to the second item of 
agenda, the matter of the Continuing Education Programs. 



At the request of the Chairman, Mr. Lynton opened the 
discussion, informing the Committee that a subcommittee of the 
Multicampus Planning Committee had been studying this matter and 
would make its recommendations in the near future. He stated 
his belief that a major effort should be made to encourage non- 
traditional programs, both on and off campus, during the week and 
on weekends. All such activities, he said, must be viewed as an 
extension of the regular campus programs. The report of the 
Multicampus subcommittee, he said, would touch briefly on the 
reasons for this, which are: 1) self-interest, 2) social interesit, 
3) job market conditions, and 4) changing patterns of employment 
and the obsolescence of knowledge. Continuing Education should 
be viewed as an extension of the regular academic programs, with 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the responsibility for the academic content of the programs cominjg 
under the perview of the provost, and with the officers of the 
continuing education program becoming the management staff for 
the operation of the programs. The Multicampus Planning Committee 
report will make a number of specific recommendations, he said, 
among which are the following: (1) the University should active- 
ly pursue those programs for which it is uniquely qualified, and 
(2) the University should continue its experimental and develop- 
mental programs as a means of assisting other colleges and univer- 
sities. At issue, he said, is the maintenance of the quality of 
the programs which are developed for the nontraditional student. 

Mr. Cooley commented that there were a number of atti- 
tudinal as well as procedural problems to be overcome in order to 
make the necessary changes in the continuing education programs 
and that this would not be easily accomplished. Mr. Lynton said 
that as continuing education programs move under the wing of the 
provost, it may be necessary to consider conditional admissions 
with some sort of evaluation at a later date to determine who 
should be allowed to continue in the programs. Mr. Callahan asked 
if internal relationships between the continuing education and 
the regular academic teaching staffs would present a problem of 
dissenting views. Chancellor Bromery said that this would not be 
a problem since many of the faculty taught in both programs. 

Chancellor Golino asked if it was anticipated that all 
continuing education programs would be run by UM/Amherst, or if 
each campus would direct its own programs. Mr. Lynton replied 
that he anticipated that each campus would have its own group of 
nontraditional students with its own type of programs, but that 
the directors of the campus programs would meet regularly to en- 
sure cooperation and coordination of programs. 

Trustee Carlson asked what the priorities between Con- 
tinuing Education and the regular undergraduate programs would 
be in the event that at some future time university resources wer 
limited. If it was necessary to cut back on enrollments, would 
the regular undergraduate and continuing education populations 
be cut on a pro rata basis? What are the criteria for answering 
this question? Chairman Rowland said that Trustee Carlson's 
question was an important one and that it should be considered 
in further discussion of this subject. Indicating that the Com- 
mittee would discuss this matter again after the receipt of the 
Multicampus report, Chairman Rowland adjourned the meeting at 
4:00 p.m. 



/Jladys^Keith Hardy 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



LRP Comm. 
5/19/76 



5008 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 2, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Shaler, Mrs. Bluestone representing Trus 
tee Fielding and Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop ; Secre- 
tary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Cronin and Morgenthau 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Short, Alternate 
Faculty Representative; Mr. Woodbury, Associate Provost 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and 
Provost 

Guests : Ms. Tehan, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. The firs 
matter was additional Tenure Awards at UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston 
(Doc. T76-080B) . The President informed the Committee that the 
cases before it had been delayed for further information and dis- 
cussion. He endeavored to outline for the Committee the process 
by which he wished to establish links between the campus Tenure 
and Grievance Committee, the campus administrators' recommendatioji 
and the judgements of the President and this Committee. In the 
case of one of the individuals appointed, the President had asked 
for an ad hoc outside committee to review the candidate's creden- 
tials and to advise him. This had been done, and it had been upon 
this committee's recommendation that he had awarded tenure in thi$ 
case. 

Vice President Lynton said the Multicampus Academic Per- 
sonnel Policy Committee as was reported to this Committee when it 
was considering the Personnel Policy (Doc. T76-081) at its last 
meeting, was studying the grievance procedures of the University, 
and will make recommendations which then will go through governance 
to the Board. One of the proposed recommendations being considered 
by the Multicampus Committee was that there should be personnel 
committees at the Provost's, Chancellor's, and President's level, 



5009 



Tenure Awards 
(Doc. T76-080B) 



5010 



F&EP Comm. 
6/2/76 



UM/ Boston — 
Vice Chancellor 



for Academic 

Affairs 

(Doc. T76-091) 



UM/Amherst , 

Boston — 

May Graduation 

Lists 

(Doc. T76-089, 

T76-090) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

especially in borderline cases. A discussion ensued about commit-- 
tees at these levels. The President said he believed that at his 
level committees should be ad hoc, because he did not believe he 
should be expected to submit all cases to such an advisory body. 
There was general agreement that the Provost-Chancellor committees 
should be standing, but several persons differed as to whether 
their memberships should vary. Chancellor Bromery said they shou 
not vary, while Chancellor Golino and Trustee Burack said they 
should. 

Upon motion made and seconded at 10:15 a.m., it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss specific 
tenure cases and the appointee to the position 
of Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 
of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 



The executive session ended at 10:45 a.m. 
made and seconded it was 



Upon motion 



VOTED : To concur in the President's award of tenure to 
those faculty members named in Doc. T76-080B at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Boston 
and Worcester. 



Mr. Lynton pointed out that the concurrence in the award 
of tenure to the individuals discussed in executive session changed 
the statistics mentioned in the President's covering memorandum 
to Doc. T76-080B. Out of 277 positive campus recommendations in 
the last three years, the President had acted favorably on 272. 
Referring to the provision of the Academic Personnel Policy (Doc. 
T76-081) that presidential reversals of campus recommendations 
shall be "rare," Mr. Lynton said that by any reasonable standard 
five negative decisions out of a possible 277 would be classified 
as "rare." A second motion was then made and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur with 
the appointment of Dr. Robert J. Steamer as Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston, as set forth 
in Doc. T76-091. 

Two additional motions were then made, seconded and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the May, 1976 Graduation Lists of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston, subject to the com- 
pletion of all requirements as certified by the 
Recorder of that campus, as contained in Doc. T76- 
089. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the May, 1976 Graduation Lists of the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester, subject to the com- 
pletion of all requirements as certified by the 
recorder of that campus, as contained in Doc. T76- 
090. 

There was no other business to come before the Commit- 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 10:55 a.m. 



OlladysOKeith Hardy • 
Secretary to the Board of Trustee 



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F&EP Coram. 
6/2/76 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

June 2, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, Spiller, 
Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Gordon 

Other Trustees : Trustees Breyer, Burack, Conti, Cronin, McNeil, 
Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding, Mr. Callahan rep- 
resenting Trustee Anrig, Secretary Parks representing Trustee 
Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel- 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Associate 
Provost; Professor Short, Alternate Faculty Representative 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Profes- 
sor Smith, Faculty Representative; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost 

Guests : Ms. Guttenberg, Mr. Federow, Ms. Tehan 



The meeting was called to order at 11:10 a.m. Chairman 
Healey was delayed, and Trustee Carlson assumed the chair in his 
absence. The first item of business was the funding of the Group 
Practice (Doc. T76-098) at the Medical School. Mr. Janis stated 
that there was an anticipated cash shortfall in the Group Practic^ 
Trust Fund account. He explained that this shortfall included 
funds needed to pay the Group Practice portion of the compensatiojji. 
The reasons for the shortfall were the late opening of the Hospi- 
tal, an increased lag in accounts receivable, and the absorption 
by the Group Practice Trust Fund of the cost of medical malprac- 
tice insurance. The projected shortfall was a short-run problem 
and funds advanced to the Group Practice could be reimbursed in 
the next two fiscal years, he said. The proposed source of funds 
to cover it was a Reimbursable Grants Trust Fund. He asked Mrs. 
Hanson to explain this trust fund. 

Mrs. Hanson explained that the trust fund had originally 



UM/ Worcester — 
Funding of 
Group Practice 
(Doc. T76-098) 



5014 



Exec. Comm. 
6/2/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been set up as a revolving fund at Amherst for the purpose of fi- 
nancing reimbursable grants in the early sixties. But with the 
growth phase of the sixties, the needs of the University for cover- 
ing expenses incurred in implementing reimbursable grants and con- 
tracts had expanded so that the amount in this fund was not ade- 
quate. Hence, from a practical point of view, the trust fund lay 
unused, while the University used other means to finance reimburs- 
able grants. This fund could be used to cover the projected short- 
fall in the Group Practice account, if the purpose of the trust 
fund were expanded. In response to a question, Mrs. Hanson explain- 
ed that the amount taken from the fund could begin to be repaid 
from the Group Practice account in mid-FY 1977 and would be fully 
repaid by June 1978. She said that the fund would be drawn down 
as needed, and would be repaid with interest at 6 percent as funds: 
became available. 

Secretary Parks picked up on the point about shortages 
in accounts receivable, and asked whether there was a system in 
the Hospital for handling this chronic problem. Mr. Janis ex- 
plained the system and a brief discussion ensued about the details; 
There was also additional discussion of the details of the proposed 
transfer. Upon motions made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
purpose of the Reimbursable Grants Trust Fund 
Account 0-11020, a revolving trust fund account, 
shall be for the financing of reimbursable grants 
and contracts and as a source of funds for reimburs- 
able payment or transfers to new trust funds and to 
University trust funded activities. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Chancellor of the Amherst Campus be and hereby 
is authorized to transfer funds from account 0- 
11020 to account 3-7000 as required. Further 
that the reimbursement from account 3-7000 for 
said transferred funds be completed by no later 
than June 30, 1978. 

UM/Worcester — The Chairman called attention then to the selection of 

Fringe Benefits! a fringe benefit consultant for the Group Practice, and asked 
for Group Chancellor Bulger to comment. Chancellor Bulger reported that 
Practice the Group Practice had been looking for a firm which could give 

help in this area, and the Wyatt Company seemed to be the best 
choice. There was no discussion, and the Chairman explained that 
this item on the agenda was merely informational. 



I 



UM/Worcester , 
President ' s 
Office — 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T76-095) 



The third item consisted of proposed Fund Transfers at 
UM/Worcester and the Office of the President (Doc. T76-095) . Mrs 
Hanson explained that one transfer was to cover an "unallotment" 
by the executive branch in the UM/Worcester "02" salary account. 
This transfer would be necessary to meet the Medical Center pay- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Exec. Comm. 

6/2/76 
roll through the end of the year. Second, she said, a transfer 
would be made into the "16" account in the President's Office to 
cover certain expenses of the University-wide Common Services 
which the Worcester campus was unable to meet in the current fis- 
cal year. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fund transfers as set forth in Trustee Docu- 
ment T76-095. 

The Committee next turned to a proposed Continuing Resoh Continuing 
lution. There was no discussion and, upon motion made and second}- Resolution 
ed, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

President be authorized to approve and adopt the 
policies and procedures governing the expenditure 
of state and non-state funds by the three campuses, 
the Office of the President and the Institute for 
Governmental Services from July 1, 1976 until such 
time as the Board of Trustees adopts the Operating 
Budget for Fiscal Year 1977. 

The approval of expenditure of said funds shall be 
consistent with the applicable state statutes govern 
ing the FY77 appropriation and in accordance with 
trustee policy. 

The Chairman then asked Mrs. Hanson to provide a report 
on the status of the FY77 University Budget in the Legislature. 
Mrs. Hanson reported that the House had approved a budget for the 
University of $107.9 million, compared with the executive budget 
recommendation of $104.7 million. The House had provided addition- 
al funds for Amherst, Boston and the Medical School, but had cut 
the President's Office Budget. The House-passed bill provided 
$9.5 million for the Hospital, which was the amount requested by 
the University. Chairman Carlson asked the President to comment 
on the proposed cut from the Office of the President. President 
Wood said he did not regard the action of the House as a matter 
for great concern if the funds were restored before final passage 
of the budget. Trustee Spiller agreed, and said he believed the 
cuts would be restored. 

Secretary Parks asked whether the President could be re- 
located on one of the campuses, and several Trustees stated stron 
ly that the Board's policy was that the President should never be 
located on one of the campuses. Secretary Parks also stated that 
the administration's position on the budget was that all state 
agencies should receive level funding with FY 1976. 



Report on FY 
1977 Budget 
Request 



7 — 
3 



The Committee turned its attention then to the proposed 
Academic Personnel Policy (Doc. T76-081) . Trustee Troy recalled 



Academic Per- 
sonnel Policy 
(Doc. T76-081) 



5016 



Exec. Comm. 
6/2/76 



UM/ Worcester — 
Amendments to 
Hospital By- 
Laws 

(Doc. T76-034A, 
T76-100) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee had reviewed 
this proposal, as mandated by the Board in its June 4, 1975 vote, 
and recommended it to the Executive Committee for its final rec- 
ommendation, since it comes under the category of rules and regu- 
lations. The Multicampus Personnel Policy Committee had forwardec 
a proposed change in the three tenure criteria: from excellence 
in two categories and strength in a third to excellence in one 
category and strength in the other two. The F&EP Committee had 
rejected this change. The Committee had also agreed to retain the 
words "rare and compelling" with regard to the circumstances under 
which the President should reverse campus tenure recommendations. 



Counsel Searson advised the Committee of his reservation - 
about the words "rare and compelling." Considerable discussion 
took place about the desirability of substituting other adjectives, 
but the Committee finally decided that it would recommend that th^ 
words remain, on the understanding that they are to be construed 
as meaning that serious consideration must be given to faculty 
recommendations in a manner consistent with Trustee policy on Uni- 
versity Governance (Doc. T73-098) . Trustee Spiller suggested thai 
the Committee defer the proposed action until September, since he 
was concerned about ambiguous and vague language, but the President 
urged the Committee not to delay because the policy was needed as 
soon as possible. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees accept 
all of the revisions to the current Academic 
Personnel Policy (T75-125) as set forth in Trus- 
tee Document T76-081 except the proposed section 
4.9(a) and to substitute therefor the text of 
section 4.10(a) of Trustee Document T75-125 : 

"Convincing evidence of excellence in at 
least two, and strength in the third, of the 
areas of teaching; of research, creative or 
professional activity; and of service, such as 
to demonstrate the possession of qualities 
appropriate to a member of the faculty occupying 
a permanent position." 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees adopt the 
Academic Personnel Policy as set forth in Trustee 
Document T76-081, as amended; further, that Docs. 
T63-050, T64-061 (except for Part II, Articles 5-7), 
T73-069, T75-125 and any other policy, rule or regu- 
lation incompatible with Doc. T76-081, as amended, 
be rescinded. 

Chairman Healey introduced a matter which had not been 
on the agenda before the meeting, relating to the UM/Worcester 
Hospital By-Laws (Doc. T76-034A) . Vice President Janis explained 
that Board approval of the proposed amendments to the Hospital By 
Laws was necessary for gaining the certification required for 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

payments under the Medicare system. After amendments were de- 
scribed and the reasons for them set forth, a motion was made, 
seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

By-Laws of the University of Massachusetts Medical 
Center (Doc. T76-034A) be amended by adopting the 
proposed amendments set forth in Doc. T76-100. 

Mr. Janis informed the Board of the enactment of the 
Fair Information Practices Act by the Commonwealth, which had to 
do with the protection of information in personnel data banks. 
The Act required that regulations be in effect by July 1, 1976, 
he said, and he explained that these regulations will be present- 
ed to the full Board at the August meeting. He mentioned this 
matter now, he said, strictly as a matter of information. 

The next matter on the agenda was a presentation on the 
University executive compensation policy (Doc. T76-093) . Presi- 
dent Wood said that the position of academic dean was becoming an 
increasingly important management position in the University. 
Increasingly, deans have been called upon to act as arbitrators 
between departments in issues of academic programming, and are key 
persons in personnel policy and budgetary decisions. However, in 
many cases the deans are falling behind, relatively speaking, in 
compensation. Their compensation is often barely distinguishable 
from that of senior professors. This matter had been raised orig 
inally by Chancellor Bromery as a matter of equity, but the equity 
point had been rapidly overtaken by reality as the campuses endea 
ored with difficulty to fill vacant decanal positions. Comparative 
studies with other universities in compensation for academic dean 
showed the University to be 41 out of 89 in arts and sciences, 21 
out of 46 in agriculture, 34 out of 96 in institutions of educatiO) 
and 48 out of 81 in engineering insofar as compensation for deans 
is concerned. For equity and for recruiting purposes, but also 
for strengthening the relative position of deans, the President 
believed it essential to raise the range for the position of dean 

President Wood said that, as the campuses try to recrui 
provosts and vice chancellors, their capacity to attract persons 
of distinction as the market frees up is seriously hampered by th^ 
present ranges. While it did not meet Chancellor Bromery' s orig- 
inal request, he proposed to allow salaries approaching the maxi- 
mum of the Board-approved salary schedules for provosts. 

In asking the Board's consideration of individual per- 
sonnel actions, said the President, he would be asking for senior 
executive compensation guidelines for three positions in addition 
to the three positions added since the guidelines were adopted. 
These were: vice president for management and business affairs, 
vice chancellor for health affairs and vice chancellor for admin- 
istration and finance, the latter two positions for UM/Worcester . 



5017 



Exec. Comm. 
6/2/76 



Fair Informa- 
tion Practices 
Act 



Executive 
Compensation 
(Doc. T76-093) 



5018 



Exec. Comm. 
6/2/76 



Classification 

of Position 

Titles 

(Doc. T76-099) 



Personnel 

Actions 

(Docs. T76-091 

T76-092, T76- 

094, T76-097, 

T76-101) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

These requests were not for new positions, he pointed out, but foi 
adjustments in the salary ranges. 

Regardless of compensation, the President pointed out, 
the University remains in a seriously uncompetitive position in 
terms of fringe benefits. The adjustments in salary ranges would 
go some distance to rectify this, but the University was still 
hampered by this disadvantage when recruiting. Both Chancellor 
Golino and Chancellor Bromery strongly agreed with the President's 
analysis, and both pointed out the additional fact that the Uni- 
versity had gone for two years without a cost-of-living increase. 

Trustee Robertson said that as one involved in salary 
administration, he believed it to be imperative for good manage- 
ment to maintain differentials between different levels of respon 
sibility. He strongly supported this measure to make the Univer- 
sity more competitive. 

Upon motions made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the President of the University to take the neces- 
sary steps to extend the application of the salary 
policy lines for senior executive positions as 
adopted on June 4, 1975, to the positions of Secre- 
tary of the University and the General Counsel of 
the University, and to establish new salary ranges 
for those positions. 

VOTED ; To enter executive session to consider Personnel 
Actions (12:35 p.m.) 

The executive session ended at 1:35 p.m. Upon motions 
made and seconded it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Classification of Position Titles as set 
forth in Doc. T76-099. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the appointment of Dr. Robert J. Steamer 
as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Pro- 
vost at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, 
as set forth in Doc. T76-091. 

VOTED : To approve the personnel action, UM/Boston, as 
set forth in Document T76-094. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 
and approve the Personnel Action, UM/Worcester , 
as detailed in Doc. T76-092. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the personnel actions, Office of the President, 
as set forth in Doc. T76-097 and Doc. T76-101. 

There was no other business to come before the Board 
and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 1:40 p.m. 



/kladyd Keith Hardy 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustee 



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Exec. Comm. 
6/2/76 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

August 4, 1976; 9:30 a.m. 

Faculty Dining Room 
Third Floor, Building 020 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Conti, Croce, Dennis, Gordon, Rowland; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary, recording 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Shearer and Troy 

Other Trustees : Trustees Cronin and Shaler 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Managemen 
and Business Affairs; Ms. Frankel, Staff Associate; Ms. Hanson, 
Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Associate Vice President for Organi- 
zation and Management; Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Bishop, Acting Director, 
Procurement Office; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Martus , Co- 
President, Student Government Association; Ms. Batiste, Student 
Senator 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Mr. Hanley, Associate Director of Material 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Fisher, Assistant Hospital 
Director; Mr. Schiff, Procurement Manager 

Guest : Ms. Dorothy Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Af- 
fairs 

The meeting was called to order at 9:45 a.m. by Chair- 
man Carlson. Mr. Carlson introduced Ms. Shukri of the Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs and then turned to the first item 
of the agenda, a report on the net cost of the University Hospi- 
tal. He said this was an item of good news. The net cost to the 
state of operating the Hospital during FY 1976 had been about 
$8,000 less than anticipated. The Trustee mandate, voted in Feb- 
ruary 1976, was that the net cost to the state should not exceed 
$3.5 million. The actual cost came in at $3,492 million. In 
fact, he said, the net cost may be even less if retroactive Medi- 
care and Medicaid payments are allowed. He then asked Mr. Janis 
to explain how these savings could be realized. Mr. Janis said 
that certification for reimbursement for Medicare and Medicaid 
payments had been received retroactive to June 3, 1976. An appeal. 
for earlier certification had been filed and if the appeal is 
granted, it could conceivably result in as much as $350,000 in 
additional revenue to the Commonwealth, thus further reducing the 



UM/Worcester- 
Net Cost of 
Hospital 



5C?2 



B&F Comm. 
8/4/76 



University 

Purchasing 

Policy 

(Doc. T77-001) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

net cost. There may also be a small savings, he said, if some of 
the purchase orders submitted at the end of the fiscal year to 
the state Controller continue to be disallowed and are carried 
over to the FY 1977 budget. 

Chairman Carlson thanked Mr. Janis for his report and 
expressed the Committee's appreciation for the excellent work 
done by Chancellor Bulger and the Worcester campus in ensuring 
that the University's commitment to the Commonwealth was kept — 
that the net cost of the Hospital would not exceed $3.5 million 
for FY 1976. Chancellor Bulger responded that the people on the 
campus had worked very hard to accomplish this and, he added, the^ 
could not have done it without the assistance and cooperation of 
the President's staff. 

Chairman Carlson introduced the second agenda item, the 
proposed University of Massachusetts Purchasing Policy (Doc. T77- 
001), a revision to the present policy which, he said, had been 
1 in use for some time and had served the University well. However 
it now seemed advisable to standardize procedures on the three 
campuses where possible. 

Mr. Carlson said the campuses and Mr. Janis' office 
had been working to improve the present purchasing manual and 
the results were the new manual and the proposed policy. He then 
asked Mr. Janis to comment on the new policy. Mr. Janis said 
that the main thrust of the review of purchasing policy was to 
learn what practices and policies were common to all campuses as 
well as differences on each campus relative to the scope of oper- 
ation, size of campus and age of the campus. He said that most 
of the detailed work in developing the manual was done by the pro 
curement directors on the campuses and that his office had served 
chiefly in a convener capacity. He said a large percentage of 
the manual covered common practices, but where the programs or 
organization of the campuses differed, separate procedures were 
established. Mr. Janis then listed the major revisions to the 
present policy: 1) allowing each campus to establish its own 
limits for purchases which must go out to bid, within the limits 
of the state statutes; 2) the addition of an affirmative action 
statement, and 3) provision for more frequent meetings of purchas 
ing directors. 

The manual is divided, he said, into four sections: 1) 
policy, 2) procedures, 3) forms and 4) staffing and organization. 
He said the manual is crucial in establishing the "rules of the 
game." It is a management necessity because accountability starts 
with identifying responsibility. He expressed his gratitude to 
the procurement directors for their work and assistance. 

Mr. Janis said that the next project would be working 
with the campuses to develop a University-wide accounting manual 
and a manual on grants and contracts. 



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University of Massachusetts 

Trustee Dennis expressed a desire that the paragraph 
on affirmative action be strengthened. He said he would like to 
see the purchasing policy tied in with the University's affirma- 
tive action program and have specific procedures included, rather 
than simply a statement that minority firms would be encouraged 
to bid. 

Mr. Janis said that the University actively seeks minor' 
ity bidders, and asked Mr. Bishop to inform the Committee of pol- 
icies and procedures now in use on the Amherst campus. Mr. Bishop 
said that the affirmative action program at Amherst had been in 
operation for several years and that bids are sent to minority 
firms wherever possible. An ongoing effort is made to develop a 
comprehensive directory of minority contractors, which are includled 
in a systematic fashion in regular bid solicitations. In addition 
to including minority vendors as a normal procurement practice, 
the University's Procurement Officers have made special efforts 
to work with potential minority vendors in such ways as explain- 
ing how to work within the state system, meet state purchasing 
requirements and how to contact other state agencies with substan- 
tial purchasing activity. Also special individual instruction is; 
provided by the campus on such procedures as how to complete docu- 
ments and how to obtain necessary bonding. 

Trustee Dennis asked if statistics were kept on the 
number of successful minority bidders. Mr. Bishop replied that 
they were not. Mr. Janis said they would try to develop a system 
for making this information available and would have a report at 
the end of the year. 

Chancellor Bromery said he thought the campus could ob- 
tain statistics which would not only show the number of successfu 
minority contractors but also the number of contractors which the 
University had routed to other buyers where their bids had been 
successful. He said the University does help minority firms to 
obtain both bids for University work and for work outside of the 
University. He added that the report should not only show the 
increase of minority firm bidders, but should also report the 
educational process carried on by the campus and show the number 
of informational contacts made with minority firms. 



Mr. Carlson emphasized that the University had, in ad- 
dition to its responsibility to minority contractors, a responsi- 
bility to the Commonwealth to obtain supplies at the best possible 
price. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve and 
adopt the University of Massachusetts Purchasing 
Policy as set forth in Trustee Document T77-001; 



B&F Comm. 
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B&F Comm. 
8/4/76 



DM/ Amherst — 
Project 11 
Financing 
(Doc. T77-009) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

further to recommend repeal of the Purchasing 
Policy adopted on September 17, 1962 (Doc. T63- 
017) . 

Chairman Carlson said the last item of agenda dealt 
with the Campus Center, Project 11 Financing — UM/Amherst (Doc. 
T77-009) . Due to a clerical error, he said, the carry-forward 
income reported in the bond prospectus had been overstated. It 
was not a legal problem, he said, but a matter of providing for 
cash flow needs, which would require the transfer of funds from 
other sources. President Wood added that after a long period of 
temporary financing, handicapped by legislative proscription and 
market constraints, the University's Building Authority managed 
to obtain permanent financing for the Campus Center earlier in 
the year. The bond prospectus, he said, had been prepared under 
severe time pressures, which had resulted in the clerical error. 

Treasurer Johnson then explained to the Committee how 
the error had occurred. When the bond prospectus was being devel^- 
oped, he said, he had been asked to prepare a complete analysis 
of income and expenses of all University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority facilities for the past five years, as well as an 
estimate for the next five years. In analyzing the first four 
years, his office had been able to use figures from the annual 
Treasurer's reports, but the FY 1975 financial report had not yet 
been published and his office had had to use work sheets provided 
by the Campus Center and accounting office. The Treasurer's of- 
fice had assumed that the 1975 data was in the identical format 
as previous years, but the format of reporting cash, he said, had 
been changed by the Campus Center management to include student 
fee revenue as a cash receipt and this resulted in a duplication 
on overstating of cash in the amount of $472,757.57. The error 
was discovered by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell, the auditors currently 
doing a financial audit of the Campus Center, and then was report 
ed by the Treasurer to the Building Authority on July 1, 1976. 
Treasurer Johnson said the error led him to overstate available 
cash for FY 1977. The problem is one of cash flow, he said, 
which was always a problem for the Campus Center during the summer 
months but was aggravated this year by a revised management and 
services agreement which requires payments for debt service due 
on a monthly basis, and by higher debt service payments resulting 
from permanent financing. 

Treasurer Johnson said that money had to be identified 
and committed to cover this cash flow problem. He said it is 
proposed that funds be allotted from the following sources in the 
order listed: 1) Trust Fund Interest, 2) Trustee Trust Fund In- 
terest Reserve, 3) Campus Rentals, and 4) a loan from the Student 
Health Services Trust Fund. He said that, depending on the suc- 
cess of Campus Center operations, it might not be necessary to 
transfer all of the money, but should it be required, these are 
sources from which it could be obtained. 



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5C?5 



B&F Comm. 
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Trustee Dennis stated his concern that an error of such 
magnitude was not discovered at once. Treasurer Johnson explain- 
ed that it had not been caught primarily because different people 
were working on different parts of the prospectus and the final 
statement had not been on hand. Chairman Carlson added that this 
was an unusual circumstance and although it would have been desir- 
able to have had a cash reconciliation, the error was the result 
of limited time and the necessity to use data which came in piece- 
meal. Treasurer Johnson said that the Campus Center cash account 
was commingled with other funds, therefore the overstatement of 
funds was not obvious. Trustee Dennis said that an overview audit 
would probably have picked up such an error. Trustee Gordon askeji 
what steps were being taken to ensure that such an error would be 
less likely to occur in the future. President Wood said that the 
Trustee vote in June, 1975 was designed to increase the University 
capability in this oversight area. Mr. Janis said that a strong 
internal auditing function was the best way to prevent this type 
of error, and that he had recently assumed responsibility for thi 
function and was working to strengthen it. Also, increased capa- 
bility in the management systems area would work towards this end 
as well. Subject to budget approval, he said, he expected to 
augment the University's internal auditing capability by adding 
three internal auditors so that a total of three teams of two 
persons each would audit University accounts. External auditing 
firms to do internal audit had been considered, but the cost is 
too high. He said, however, that an outside firm could be employ 
ed to train the internal auditing staff and that a program is now 
in the development process. Trustee Gordon asked that this be 
given high priority. 



Mr. Janis said that, at the initiative of Chancellor 
Br ornery, a financial audit of the Campus Center and Continuing 
Education had been undertaken and that similar audits of the othefc: 
major auxiliary enterprises were planned as well. The University 
now has a computerized auditing system — the IAI System. Trustee 
Dennis said there should be an auditing schedule so that it can 
be determined what is being audited and when so that functions 
will not be inadvertently overlooked. Mr. Janis said that aside 
from his assumption of the internal audit function, further steps 
include a new office of University Controller. This office will 
be established to deal with University-wide accounting policy and 
to work with controllers on each campus who will continue to report 
to the Chancellor. Chairman Carlson asked that when an auditing 
schedule has been determined, it be made available to the Budget 
and Finance Committee. 

Trustee Cronin raised a question about the status of 
the bank proposed for the Campus Center and asked where the reve- 
nue anticipated from this source would come from if the bank did 
not become a tenant. Mr. Gulko replied the revenue would have to 
come from some other area of Campus Center activity. 



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B&F Comm. 
8/4/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson said sources of support for the Campus 
Center should be re-examined. He did not feel that Trust Fund 
Interest accounts should be perenially chipped away to meet the 
problems of the Campus Center. He stated his view that the pro- 
posed transfer of funds from the Trustee Reserve should be a loan 
and should be repaid with interest. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the Campus Center is actual- 
ly in a better financial position than appears to be the case be- 
cause of its inventories and receivables, and he believes condi- 
tions are improving. However, there is still a cash flow problem 

Chancellor Bromery said the campus is still learning 
how to operate the Center and is attempting to build up business. 
With permanent financing, the Center is in a better position to 
make plans. The Garage is a drain on the Center because of its 
deficit operation, he said, and if the Garage could be made a 
part of the balanced transportation system at the campus, it 
might solve this problem, or at least ameliorate it. The Garage 
deficit, he said, comes to about $200,000 a year. The sharing of 
that fiscal burden presents an internal political problem. A 
campus task force is at work now looking for ways by which the 
garage could be integrated into the balanced transportation system 
so as to increase the usage of the garage and reduce the deficit 
by using revenue from other parking facilities. Trustee Gordon 
was pleased to learn that the composition of the task force was 
made up of faculty, students and employees — users of the system. 

Chairman Carlson asked when the task force would have 
a report. Chancellor Bromery replied that it is expected in early 
fall. 



Trustee Dennis asked how the Trustee Trust Fund Reserve 
was used. President Wood replied that it provided for such activ 
ities as the Task Force composed of University and Community peo- 
ple which discussed developments at Columbia Point or financial 
aid to foreign students each year. Mrs. Hanson added that the 
fund has been used in the past for unusual and emergency needs. 
It might be used to recoup losses from a fire, for instance. It 
is a buffer for emergency and unanticipated expenses. 

Chairman Carlson repeated his concern that the Trustee 
Reserve would be depleted by using it to cover deficits such as 
the Campus Center operation, and that he did not think this was 
a proper use of the funds. That is why, he said, he felt that 
the money should be repaid by the Campus Center to the Trustee 
Reserve account. Trustee Gordon commented that the money might 
more appropriately be repaid without interest. 

Trustee Carlson asked that the proposed vote be amendec 
to indicate the Trustee Reserve account portion of the transfer 
as a loan rather than a gift, and that the money was to be repaic 
without interest over a three-year period. Trustee Cronin ex- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pressed strenuous objection to making this a loan. There being 
no further discussion, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University 
to make the transfers of funds as described 
in Trustee Document T77-009 in the event said 
transfers become necessary in order to ensure 
sufficient cash flow for the Campus Center 
during FY 1977; provided, however, that $60,000 
be repaid into the Trustee Trust Fund Reserve 
account within a period of three (3) years. 

Chairman Carlson asked if there was any further busines 
President Wood said that he would just like to inform the Commit- 
tee that for the first time in the last three years, the Univer- 
sity had a budget at the beginning of the fiscal year. He then 
informed the Committee of the amounts allotted to the campuses, 
the Hospital, and the President's Office, indicating that it rep- 
resented an increase of 8 percent over the previous year's budget 

The meeting adjourned at 11:07 a.m. 





Assistant Serf/tretary 
f or Gladys Keith v/Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

August 4, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Faculty Dining Room 
Third Floor, Building 020 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Healey, President Wood; 



\ Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, 
Spiller; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Member: Trustee Troy 



Other Trustees: Trustees Burack, Conti, Cronin, Dennis, Morgen- 



thau; Secretary Parks representing Governor Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 



ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Planning; 
Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Associate Vice Pres- 
ident for Organization and Management; Mr. Sear son, General 
Counsel 

UM/ Amherst: Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Pres- 



ident for Academic Affairs and Provost 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Budget Director; 
Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative; Mr. Casey, Registrar 
Ms. 0' Shaughnessy , Director of Affirmative Action 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger 



Guest: Ms. Dorothy Sukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 11:15 a.m. by Chair- 
man Healey, who asked Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs, to speak to the first item of agenda, 
University of Massachusetts Privacy and Confidentiality Regula- 
tions (Doc. T77-005), a requirement of the July 1, 1976, Fair 



Information Practices Act passed by the Legislature of the 
Commonwealth. This act regulates access to and use of informa- 
tion contained in personal records, computerized or manual. 

The law provides 1) that access be controlled by a log 
or other means, 2) that permission of the individual involved be 
obtained before the records can be disseminated, except as other- 
wise provided by statute, and 3) that an individual shall have 
the right to review his or her own record and to seek correction 
if inaccurate. The law is designed to ensure accuracy and 
confidentiality of personal records. It requires that a report 



5023 



Fair Informa- 
tion Practices 
Act — University 
Interim Regu- 
lations 
(Doc. T77-005) 



5030 



Exec. Comm. 
8-4-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be made to the Secretary of State of all personal data systems. 
He called attention to the fact that this is a different piece 
of legislation from the "freedom of information" law, which 
makes available certain public records. This law is similar to 
the so-called "Buckley" amendment to the federal law, except 
that the Buckley amendment applies only to student records, 
whereas the state law is more inclusive. 

The intent of the law is to control the types of in- 
formation that go into computer data banks. The law requires 
various agencies to issue implementation regulations and the 
Executive Office of Administration and Finance has issued a 
model set of regulations. The interim regulations proposed by 
the University incorporate the basic features of the A & F 
regulations and add additional regulations which seemed appro- 
priate for the University. Mr. Janis said he understood that 
the Community Colleges were about to adopt the proposed Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts regulations. 

Medical records, as opposed to student records, are 
exempt from the Fair Information Practices law, as are public 
records. The proposed regulations, he emphasized, are interim 
regulations and it is anticipated that they will be reviewed in 
November or December of this year. Final regulations will be 
drafted for presentation to the Board of Trustees in February 
1977. 



Chairman Healey inquired who would supervise this 
process administratively, to which Mr. Janis replied that it would 
be essentially a campus function and would be handled largely by < 
the Personnel Department. The President's Office will monitor 
the process with the Personnel Directors. Additional personnel 
would probably be needed, he said, to implement the regulations. 
Trustee Croce inquired about the confidential status of material 
in the file previous to passage of the July law. Mr. Janis 
said that a "grandfather clause" would protect the confidentiality 
of recommendations received prior to July. Also built into the 
regulations is the idea of "informed consent", he said, whereby 
a person can waive his right to search the file, in which case 
a person making a recommendation would be so informed and could 
then consider that his recommendation would remain confidential. 
Trustee Croce asked what mechanism would be provided to correct 
any injustices an individual might find in his record. Mr. 
Kaplan replied that there is a provision in the regulations for 
rectifying such injustices, should they be substantiated. 



Secretary Parks informed the Committee that the Execu- 
tive Office of Educational Affairs had asked for a ruling from 
the Attorney General's Office with regard to the differences 
between the set of regulations developed by the Secretary's 
Office, which require review by A & F, and those proposed by the 
University, which do not. Mr. Janis said the reasons the 



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University had written its own regulations were threefold: 
1) The Secretary's regulations did not exempt the Teaching 
Hospital, 2) they did not allow for the waiver of access with 
regard to confidential recommendations, and 3) they did not state 
that the Buckley amendment was controlling. The third item, he 
said, was critical because it determined the amount of federal 
money that would be forthcoming. 

There being no further discussion on this topic, on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and adopt the University's Interim Privacy and 
Confidentiality Regulations (Trustee Doc. T77- 
005) under the Fair Information Practices Act 
(Chapter 66A of the General Laws); further, to 
recommend that the President be directed to re- 
port to the Executive Committee no later than 
the February, 1977, meeting of the Board on the 
need for any amendments to the said regulations. 

Chairman Healey then turned discussion to the matter 
of the Affirmative Action Program — UM/Boston (Doc. T77-004) , 
asking Chancellor Golino to speak. Chancellor Golino said that 
the proposed program being presented to the Committee was the 
result of a full year's work and that he believed it to be a 
concrete affirmation of the commitment of the Boston campus to 
affirmative action. Chancellor Golino then introduced Ms. 
Pamela 0' Shaughnessy , Director of Affirmative Action at 
UM/Boston, who had supervised the development of the program. 

Secretary Parks asked if the proposed program would be 
submitted to the Board of Higher Education for a review and if 
it was consistent with the Board's regulations. Chancellor 
Golino said the program could not be submitted to BHE until the 
Board had acted upon it, but he felt that it was consistent with 
the BHE regulations. President Wood informed Secretary Parks 
that the Board of Higher Education's regulations } in absence of 
counsel of its own, had been drafted by the University counsel; 
therefore, he expected that the two sets would be consistent. 
Secretary Parks then asked if the program had been checked with 
the Governor's executive order. Ms. 0' Shaughnessy replied that 
she had been working with the State Office of Affirmative Action, 
the Office of Civil Rights and the Board of Higher Education 
and that the program had been seen by them and they found it 
acceptable. 

Trustee Dennis asked if minority contractors were in- 
cluded in the scope of the law regarding affirmative action. 
Ms. 0' Shaughnessy replied that they were not covered in the 
Governor's executive order, but Chancellor Golino added that the 
Boston campus does attempt to include minority contractors where- 
ever possible. 



-3- 



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Exec. Comm. 
8-4-76 



UM/Boston — 
Affirmative 
Action Pro- 
gram (Doc. 
T77-004) 



5032 






Exec. Comm. 
8-4-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Dennis said that although the proposed program 
has a strong commitment to affirmative action in the area of 
employment, he would like to see included wording which would 
strengthen the University's commitment to minority vendors. 
Secretary Parks picked up on this point and asked that the motion 
be so amended. 

Answering this suggestion, Trustee Carlson said the 
difference between personnel and purchasing was clear. He 
supported a strong commitment to affirmative action, but he 
pointed out that purchasing involved the expenditure of sub- 
j stantial amounts of public funds, and he did not believe that 
considerations of affirmative action could tacitly be assumed to 
override the University's responsibility to purchase supplies at 
the lowest possible cost. Before he could support an amendment 
of the sort proposed, therefore, he would need to hear an 
explanation of how a conflict between affirmative action and low- 
cost purchasing would be resolved, should such a conflict occur. 

Addressing the chair, Secretary Parks protested that 
this comment was "degrading." He said he had been "fighting in 
this vineyard" for a long time, and every time he or others 
called for affirmative action in contracts or purchasing, some- 
one assumed that it was an attack on standards of efficiency. 
Just the night before last, he said, Secretary of State Kissinger 
had answered a question before an Urban League audience about the 
lack of black employees in the State Department by saying that 
"we don't want to do away with our efficiency." All he wanted 
was for the Board to include in this policy language that would 
"strike at the heart of the problem in terms of vendors," and 
that they be given maximum opportunity. 

Trustee Spiller took vehement exception to what he 
inferred as Secretary Parks' suggestion that the University was 
presently guilty of wrongdoing, and if so, he resented the 
implication. "I had no intention," said Trustee Carlson, 
addressing Secretary Parks, "of degrading anybody in my comments 
He said he had simply raised the question of what would happen 
if two vendors, one minority, were about equally qualified but 
the minority vendor offered a higher price? Would the minority 
vendor be preferred? 

Several short statements followed on different aspects 
of the issue. Some saw no reason not to express merely the 
intent to take affirmative action with regard to minority ven- 
dors, while others felt such an amendment to be irrelevant to 
the motion on the floor, or that it deserved more careful 
attention before adoption by the Board. Counsel Searson worried 
about a "hasty and simplistic" amendment. Vice President Janis 
pointed out that the purchasing manual recommended by the Budget 
and Finance Committee earlier that morning already contained a 
commitment to affirmative action with respect to minority vendors. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Following a suggestion by Trustee Morgenthau, the 
Chairman offered the following compromise: the motion as offered 
should be voted on so that the policy would conform to H.E.W. 
standards; then a second vote could be proposed which would 
express the Board's intention to develop an affirmative action 
program in purchasing without presumption of discrimination at 
present. He asked Trustees Dennis and Morgenthau to develop this 
second vote for the Board meeting. This appeared to satisfy 
everybody, and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees adopt and 
approve the Affirmative Action Program of the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston which is 
contained in Trustee Document T77-004. 

Chairman Healey then turned to the matter of the use 
of the University facility at 100 Arlington Street by the Boston 
School Department. At the request of the Chairman, Chancellor 
Golino explained that the preceding year the School Department 
had leased five floors in the building for classroom use and 
that they would like space again this year, although only two 
floors would be required. He said he would like authorization 
from the Board of Trustees to enter into contract negotiations 
with the School Department for the lease of two floors of the 
building. 

Trustee Robertson asked what use would be made of the 
three floors not being used by the School Department. Chancellor 
Golino said that some space would be used to give relief to 
College III, possibly some for the program "Another Course to 
College" and some would remain empty until such time as other 
uses were found for the space. The Urban Observatory may also 
require more space. Trustee Robertson asked if any attempt had 
been made to rent space, to which the Chancellor replied 
negatively, and said that he did not know whether space could be 
legally rented in a University-owned building. Trustee Croce 
inquired as to what the long-range plans for the building were. 
Chancellor Golino said it had been difficult to make plans for 
the building when it was not known how much space the School 
Department would need, and when its use was contingent upon the 
development of the Harbor Campus. Trustee Croce said that a 
committee should be set up to look into this matter. Trustee 
Spiller said that it might be appropriate for the Boston campus 
to respond to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds on future 
plans for 100 Arlington Street. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the Chancellor of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston, to negotiate and execute 



-5- 



5033 



Exec. Comm. 
8-4-76 



UM/Boston — 
Use of 100 
Arlington 
Street by 
Boston School 
Department 



5034 



Exec. Comm. 
8-4-76 



UM/Amherst — 

UM/ Bo st on — 

Administrative 

Withdrawal 

Policy 

(Doc. T77-006 

and T77-007) 



UM/Amherst — 
Classification 
of Position 
Title, Dean, 
School of Engi- 
neering 
(Doc. T77-003) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

an agreement with the City of Boston 
whereby for a period of time not extending 
beyond June 30, 1977, the seventh and 
eighth floors of the University's facilities 
at 100 Arlington Street, Boston, may be 
occupied and utilized by the City for pro- 
viding educational services and activities 
for students of the Madison Park High School 
in return for a payment for expenses attrib- 
utable to the City's use of said facility. 

The next agenda item was the matter of the Adminis- 
trative Withdrawal Policy — UM/Amherst and UM/Boston (Doc. T77- 
006 and T77-007) . Mr. Lynton explained that the Amherst and 
Boston campuses had been working with the President's Office and 
University counsel to develop a policy on administrative with- 
drawal. This would occur, he said, in situations where a student 
did not meet financial or other administrative obligations. Al- 
though the conditions which would warrant administrative with- 
drawal on the two campuses were identical, he said, implementa- 
tion procedures would vary slightly, and for that reason separate 
policy documents had been developed. In reply to a query from 
Trustee Robertson, Chancellor Golino said that the campus made 
a great effort to accommodate the needs of the students and that 
the policy ensured fairness and due process for all students. 
Trustee Conti inquired if this policy had gone before the 
Committee on Student Affairs. Mr. Lynton replied that it had 
not, since that Committee had not met recently, but that it had 
been widely discussed on both campuses. Trustee Conti asked 
how Chancellor Golino envisioned the composition of the 
Administrative Withdrawal Review Committee, suggesting that it 
be set up in the same way as other standing committees of the 
Assembly and that the Assembly write the charge and determine 
the membership of the committee. Chancellor Golino said the 
composition of the committee had not been considered as yet and 
that he would be happy to discuss the matter with Trustee Conti. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

it approve the Rules and Regulations Governing 
Administrative Withdrawal Doc. T77-006 for UM/ 
Amherst and Doc. T77-007 for UM/Boston, and 
that, effective the fall semester 1976, those 
rules and regulations become University policy 
at the respective campuses. 

Chairman Healey next introduced the subject of the 
Classification of Position Title, Dean, School of Engineering — 
UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-003) . Chancellor Bromery said the reason 
this request was being made is that in the search for a new 
Dean of the School of Engineering, it had become obvious that 
the salary range for academic deans was far below the require- 

-6- 



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3035 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

merits for this post. He said that should the Dean relinquish 
his post and remain a faculty member, his salary would revert 
to a level not to exceed the maximum of the General Salary 
Schedule. 

At the Chancellor's request, Mr. Alfange briefly 
summarized the problems incurred in the search for the dean with 
regard to salary range. He said the University had to compete 
with industry for such people and in order to get a top-notch 
person, it would be necessary to increase the salary range. 
Trustee Gordon asked what regulations the University had with 
regard to consulting activities of deans and professors. 
Mr. Alfange said the University allowed one day a week for con- 
sulting. Dr. Croce asked if the deans of engineering in other 
universities in the country had higher salary ranges than other 
deans. Mr. Alfange said they are in the top bracket nationally, 
since senior administrators of engineering technology can commanc 
salaries outside of the academic marketplace. 

Trustee Morgenthau asked the size of the Engineering 
School. Mr. Alfange replied that there were about 100 faculty 
and about 1000 students. Discussion ensued as to the benefits 
of the research and consulting work of deans to the institution 
and the amount of time that should be devoted to these activities 
Trustee Burack said she was opposed to making exceptions to 
salary ranges. Trustee Shaler asked if it would be possible for 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy to review 
Trustee policy on consultative activities , and it was the sense 
of the meeting that this would be done. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Classification of Position Title as detailed 
in Doc. T77-003. 

Chairman Healey then read the proposed vote on affirma- 
tive action with regard to purchasing which, he said, would be 
presented at the full Board meeting. There was no objection to 
the wording. 

At the request of the Chairman, the Executive Committee 
at 12:25 p.m. 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
discussing honorary degree nominees. 

The executive session concluded at 1:00 p.m. and there 
being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. 




Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-7- 



Exec. Comm. 
8-4-76 



Executive 
Session 



- 50:*6 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

August 10, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 
Trustees Burack, Clark, Shearer; Mr. Colby representing Commis- 
sioner Winthrop; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, Assistant Secre- 
tary, recording 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Abrams, Dennis and Eddy 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 

UM/Boston : Mr. Meehan, Planning Director; Mr. Steamer, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gilmore, Directo|r 
of Community Services 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Greig, Director of Physical Plant 

Guests : Mr. Richard Brooker and Mr. Tim Coppolla, The Architect' 
Collaborative 

The meeting was called to order at 11:00 a.m. Presi- 
dent Wood first brought the Committee up to date on developments 
on the Columbia Point Peninsula, apart from the University. He 
commented that the future development of the University would 
have to take cognizance of the context of the activities of the 
city and of other public and private institutions, as well as the 
community, in the area. He told the Committee that a working 
group had been formed, of which Chairman Spiller was a member, 
which had held two meetings and was discussing the development 
possibilities of the Peninsula. Second, discussions were going 
on through the good offices of Senator Brooke about the renovation 
and redesign of the housing project. Third, the designs of I.M. 
Pei for the Kennedy Library were to be unveiled tomorrow at a 
community gathering and would be available for the Trustees some- 
time afterward. The President mentioned several other activities 
taking place in connection with the Peninsula, including explora 
tions by the Boston Opera Company for a facility on the campus. 
The President then described the progress of the capital outlay 
request in the Legislature and expressed optimism about its pas- 
sage. There was a discussion of the amount and prognosis of the 
capital outlay request, and the tone was optimistic. There was 
also a discussion of ongoing litigation with respect to the faulty 
cooling system on the Harbor Campus. 



5037 



Columbia Point 



-5038 



B&G Comm. 
8/10/76 

Kennedy Library 

UM/Boston — 
Buildings 030 
and 080/2 



UM/Boston — 
MBTA Busway 



UM/Worcester- 

Recreational 

Facilities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President then asked Vice President Robinson to 
brief the Committee in more detail on the Kennedy Library. Mrs. 
Robinson described details of the Pei design and site. She then 
told the Committee that the University had asked The Architect's 
Collaborative (TAC) to develop new site studies of the current 
campus building plans, since TAC was already designing buildings 
030 and 080/2. TAC had been asked to review the University's 
plans in terms of the effects of access to the Kennedy Library, 
the possibility of the State Archives and a Fine Arts building 
being built on the campus. TAC had also been asked to determine 
ways that the new buildings could be positioned so that if there 
were no further expansion of the campus, the new configuration 
would not have the raw edge it presently has, but could stand as 
a finished campus. 

Mr. Brooker of TAC presented a model of the new build- 
ings and described the reasons for the proposals contained thereih 
Trustee Burack observed that the site seemed terribly dense and 
wondered why there was not a greater emphasis on open spaces. 
Mrs. Robinson said there actually was a great deal of open space, 
and that in fact too much space between the campus and the Pump- 
house and between the campus and the Library was more of a problem 
The spaces between the buildings, she said, were as wide as the 
Commonwealth Avenue Mall. 

The next item was the proposed MBTA Busway between Mt. 
Vernon Street in the Columbia Point housing project and the Harbor 
Campus perimeter road. Mrs. Robinson explained that the current 
plan called for the busway to carry only MBTA buses, and would be 
operated by a card-activated gate. Trustee Clark said she did 
not believe that the needs of the community had been adequately 
considered in the plans for this busway. There followed a long 
discussion about whether the busway would actually benefit or work 
to the detriment of the needs of the residents. Trustee Clark 
suggested that the community had not been consulted, and Trustee j 
Shearer described fears in the community that present bus service, 
would actually be harmed. Mr. Gilmore described a number of meet 
ings which had included community leaders. After much discussion 
on the degree of community involvement and the role of the 
University, it was agreed, at the President's suggestion, that 
further meetings ought to take place between the University and 
the Columbia Point Development Council, with representatives of 
the MBTA present, to iron out any confusion over the busway 's 
effects. 



The next matter was a report on recreational facilities 
at UM/Worcester . There are at present, said Mrs. Robinson, no 
outdoor facilities at the Medical School. Dr. Karl Hittelman has 
been working with a group of students interested in developing a 
recreation program. They contacted the Department of Landscape 
Architecture at the Amherst campus and asked if it would prepare 
plans for athletic facilities. Students from that Department 



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50-T9 



B&G Coram. 
8/10/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

visited the site, as a class assignment, and developed two sets 
of sketches for outdoor facilities on two different sites adjaceiit 
to the School. The costs estimated for the project were extreme- 
ly modest — less than a previous estimate for grading and seeding 
the sites — and the hope was that use could be made of the plans 
if the capital outlay bill is enacted. Mrs. Robinson described 
this activity as a "hands across the campuses" spirit of coopera- 
tion. 



The Committee turned then to the Revised Campus Safety UM/Amherst-- 
Program at the Amherst Campus. Mr. Littlefield explained that Campus Safety 
the campus had been trying for eight years and through six Amherst 
Town Meetings to close North Pleasant Street through the campus, 
but the May 13, 1976 Town Meeting had rescinded the Town's previous 
agreement with the University for the closing of the street in 
exchange for the construction of the new Northeast By-Pass by the 
Department of Public Works. He explained that the University 
now plans to request construction of that part of the by-pass 
west of North Pleasant Street and the connection to Route 116 
northwest of the campus. He said the University planned to re- 
quest a new vote of approval by the fall Town Meeting for this 
construction. The purpose of the new road, he said, was to 
reduce through-campus traffic. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 




Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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5041 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

September 8, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Administration Building 
Room 308 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Conti, Dennis, Gordon, Rowland, Troy; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Croce and Shearer 

Other Trustees : Trustee Cronin; Secretary Parks representing 
Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Planning; 
Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Hester, Associate Vice Presi- 
dent for Business Services; Mr. Mazareas, Staff Assistant; 
Mr. Prussing, Deputy Director, Office of the Budget; Mr. Searson, j 
General Counsel; Ms. Taylor, Staff Assistant, Office of the Budget 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Schwartz, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Cathey , Controller; 
Mr. Fellner, Assistant Controller 

Guests : Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Coun- 
sel; Mr. Martus, Co-President of the UM/ Amherst Student Govern- 
ment Association 



The meeting was called to order at 11:00 a.m. by Chair- j Report of 
man Carlson. Mr. Carlson reviewed briefly the order of business Investment 
and then asked Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood to report Counsel 
on the status of the University's endowment portfolio. Mr. Wood 
reported that there had been little change in the stock portfolio 
since he had presented his analysis in April. The amount of 
stock held is slightly over the 60 percent ratio which had been 
recommended. The business forecast has not changed since he last 
reported. He recommended that the proceeds from the Treasury 
notes which matured on August 15 be reinvested, along with some 
other available cash, in new Treasury notes and a small additional 
investment in Xerox stock. After a brief discussion, on motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize and empower Kenneth W, Johnson, 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
to execute the following transactions: 



5042 



B&F Comm. 
9/8/76 



Sale of Oil and 
Realty Develop- 
ments, Inc. 
Common Stock 
(Doc. T77-017) 



UM/Amherst — 
General Elec- 
tric Foundation 
Grant 
(Doc. T77-018) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Collect U. S 



Treasury 7-1/2% Notes, 



8/15/76 
Available Cash 






$40,000 

19,000 

$59,000 


Now Proposed 

Own Change BUY 




MARKET 
Per Total 
Share Amount 


50M 50M U.S. Treas. 

2/15/83 
400 100 Xerox 


8% 


102-1/2 
65 


$51,250 
6,500 



$57,750 

Chairman Carlson asked Mr. Wood if he had further items 
to report. Mr. Wood replied that he had concluded his report ex- 
cept to say that the other proposed actions related to invest- 
ments had his endorsement. Chairman Carlson thanked Mr. Wood, 
who then departed from the meeting. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the next item on the 
agenda, the matter of the Sale of Oil and Realty Developments , 
Inc. , Common Stock (Doc. T77-017) , asking Treasurer Johnson to 
review the status of this stock. Treasurer Johnson explained 
that the stock in question is held by the Murray D. and Anne H. 
Lincoln Trust, of which the University is the sole beneficiary. 
The Oil and Realty Development Company is being liquidated and, 
therefore, Mr. Thornbury, trustee for the Lincoln Trust, would 
like the concurrence of the University to sell the stock. The 
sale of the stock would facilitate the closing of the Lincoln 
Trust as well as provide the necessary funds to carry the real 
estate portion of the Trust for another year or until it is sold. 
The balance from the proceeds of the sale would be turned over 
to the Lincoln Endowment fund when the Trust is terminated. On 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur with the proposal of the Trustee of 
the Murray D. and Anne H. Lincoln Trust, P. L. 
Thornbury, for the sale to Oil and Realty De- 
velopment, Inc. of 5,300 shares of its common 
stock at $15 per share to be paid in twelve (12) 
monthly installments of $6,625 each, as set forth 
in Doc. T77-017. 

President Wood abstained. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Treasurer Johnson to ex- 
plain the necessity for action with regard to the General Elec- 
tric Foundation Grant (Doc. T77-018) . Treasurer Johnson explaine 
that the School of Engineering had been the recipient of a grant 
of $10,000 to support the 1976 Engineering Career Orientation for 
High School Students from the Inner City summer program at UM/ ■ 



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5043 



B&F Comm. 
9/8/76 



| UM/ Boston- 
Alfred R. 
i Ferguson Prize 
iFund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst. Payment of the grant was made by issuing 174 shares of 
General Electric Company unregistered stock and a check for 
$27.62. Since the stock is unregistered, it must be sold in ac- 
cordance with Rule 144 issued by the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. A vote of the Committee on Budget and Finance is 
required authorizing the Treasurer to sign the Stock Power. 
There being no objection to this sale, on motion made and sec- 
onded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts, to sell 174 shares 
of General Electric Company unregistered stock 
and to deposit the net proceeds from said sale in 
addition to the check for $27.62 in the Engineer- 
ing Career Orientation Trust Fund to support high 
school students from the Inner City summer pro- 
gram, all as detailed in Doc. T77-018. 

President Wood abstained. 

At the request of Chairman Carlson, Treasurer Johnson 
explained that the Alfred R. Ferguson Prize Fund — UM/Boston, had 
originally been established as a Trust Fund, as it was less than 
$3000, but contributions to the fund had increased to where it 
is now in excess of $4000 and it has been requested that a sepa- 
rate endowment fund be established, with the money invested 
separately from other similar funds, where assets are regularly 
pooled. Since there was no objection to the establishment of 
the endowment fund as a separate investment, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED i To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Alfred R. Ferguson Prize Fund be established as 
an endowment fund but invested separately from 
the regularly pooled assets in either a long- 
term savings account or high-interest certificate 
or account for the purpose of awarding annually 
part or all of the interest earned during the 
preceding fiscal year as a prize to junior or 
senior students who have done distinguished work 
in American Literature; recipients of the awards 
shall be selected by the English Department, 
College of Arts and Sciences, Harbor Campus. Un- 
distributed income remaining on June 30 shall be 
added to the principal of the fund. 

The next item of agenda was the matter of the authori- jUM/Worcester— 
zation of a signature at UM/Worcester . Treasurer Johnson ex- Authorization 
plained that in order to process certain paper work through the of Signature 
State Controller, it is necessary that the Board grant authoriza- 
tion of certain individuals to sign these papers. Mr. Richard 
Keene is the newly appointed Bursar at UM/Worcester and Chancellor 



-3- 



5044 



B&F Comm. 
9/8/76 



UM/Worcester — 
Premium for 
Malpractice 
Insurance 
(Doc. T77-023) 



FY 1977 Operat- 
ing Budget 
(Doc. T77-008) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Bulger has requested that his name be added to those persons al- 
ready authorized to sign. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
Richard E. Keene, in his capacity as Bursar at 
the Worcester campus, to sign and execute State 
Receipt Vouchers and Batch Control Schedules 
processed by the Medical School and Hospital to 
the Controller of the Commonwealth. 

Chairman Carlson asked Mr. Janis, Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs, to introduce the next item of 
agenda, the matter of the Premium for Malpractice Insurance — 
UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-023) . Mr. Janis explained that the pre- 
mium in question was for medical malpractice insurance to cover 
nonphysician patient service personnel at the Medical Center and 
did not include physicians, whose insurance was paid from Group 
Practice funds. The premium was due on August 20 and had lapsed, 
he said. The Deputy Controller for the state had refused to pay 
the premiums , even though the Attorney General had ruled in a 
similar case concerning Southeastern Massachusetts University 
that this was a proper use of state funds. President Wood stated 
that this was not the first time that the Controller's Office had 
attempted to exercise control over the University by means of 
withholding money, a practice which was beyond its authority. 

Mr. Janis continued by explaining that the premium 
deadline had been extended to September 2. In order to meet the 
payment, the insurance brokers had to advance the funds for the 
premium with the explicit understanding that the University 
would reimburse them by September 22. Treasurer Johnson ex- 
plained that the premium was due on a daily basis and that $5,000 
would have to be delivered today to the brokers. 

Chairman Carlson explained that two votes were being 
proposed in the Executive Committee for action which would re- 
affirm the intent of the Trustees that this coverage be provided 
and would also provide for a means of paying the premium if the 
money should not be forthcoming from the state. He called atten- 
tion to the fact that although the action of the Trustees for the 
payment of the first premium had a dollar limit because the hos- 
pital was just then opening and the personnel covered at that 
time was limited, the proposed vote should not have a limit since 
the hospital is in full operation. 

Chancellor Bulger expressed his appreciation to every- 
one who helped to meet this situation, because they could not 
have kept the hospital open without this insurance coverage. It 
was the consensus of the members of the committee to recommend 
favorably the two proposed votes to the Executive Committee. 

Chairman Carlson then turned to the matter of the FY 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1977 Operating Budget (Doc. T77-008) . He called attention to the 
errata sheets, which contain minor corrections and supplementary 
data. Chairman Carlson then asked President Wood to comment on 
the budget. President Wood said the fact that the University had 
received its budget at the beginning of the fiscal year had made 
it possible to begin to fill vacancies, purchase supplies and 
begin to return to normal operation. He called attention to the 
fact that for the first time, a separate section was provided in 
the budget for Common Services. Previously, these services had 
been handled by the lead agencies on the Amherst campus. They ar|e 
now being shared by the three campuses and it is hoped that they 
will operate on a user-cost basis. He reported that a University 
wide task force has been established with the goal of moving 
toward program budgeting. He said he expected that next year's 
budget process would have further reforms and innovations. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Mrs. Hanson, Budget Directolr 
to give an overview of the budget document. Mrs. Hanson stated 
that the FY 1977 budget totalled $173 million, representing a 7 
percent increase over the FY 1976 budget. The budget for the UM/ 
Worcester Teaching Hospital had increased substantially, she said 
with small increases for the other two campuses. The only de- 
crease was in the budget for the President's Office, which had 
lost two positions. In addition, the appropriation act mandates 
that campus funds may not be used for the President's Office, whijch 
results in a major short-fall in the salary category. She said 
that there had been a small increase in state funds for the Insti' 
tute for Governmental Services, which would provide for full fund- 
ing of positions in this area for the first time. She said that 
its Director, Maurice Donahue, continues to attract non-state 
funds as the Institute provides expanding services to the Common- 
wealth. Two-thirds of the income for the Institute, she said, 
came from non-state funds. 

Chairman Carlson next asked Mr. Janis to review the 
section of the budget dealing with Common Services. Mr. Janis 
said that the $1,961,000 requested for FY 1977 represents an in- 
crease of $342,000 over expenditures for FY 1976. This additional 
money is required because of increased data processing costs. 
Increased use of the equipment, increased rental fees, additional 
storage space, more stringent reporting requirements, increased 
cost of supplies and additional personnel necessary to handle the 
increasing data base account for the large portion of this increase, 
In establishing the University-wide controllership, one new posi- 
tion has been added, and in the area of auditing, three additional 
auditors and one additional secretary will be required. The totaH 
number of new positions in these areas is fourteen. 

Chairman Carlson recognized Mr. Jay Martus, Co-President 
of the Student Government Association at UM/Amherst, who mentioned 
the problems for the campus caused by not knowing at the time 
budgets were being prepared how much the contribution toward Com- 



S045 



B&F Comm. 
9/8/76 



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046 



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B&F Comm. 
9/8/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

mon Services would be. He said the University should go to the 
Legislature with this part of the budget identified. Chairman 
Carlson agreed that this figure should be available, but explainer 
that it had not been available this year because the bringing 
together of these services had been so recent. He, however, dis- 
agreed that the University should go to the Legislature with this 
part of the budget, since it is entirely up to the Board to make 
these operating budget determinations. 

Mr. Martus next asked why the administrative allowance 
part of federal financial aid could not be used for Common Serv- 
ices. Mr. Janis replied that it was used for this purpose to the 
limits allowed by law, but that there were very strict federal 
regulations covering this area. Mr. Martus then asked what the 
budget requirements would be for the data processing area in the 
future. Chairman Carlson said that this is difficult to forecast 
but that it is expected that there will be an increase in this 
area. 

Trustee Gordon said he had a question on the other side 
of the coin — did Mr. Janis feel that the increase in budget was 
sufficient to develop the types of controls which would ensure 
that problems such as those which surfaced in the School of Educa-- 
tion would not recur. Mr. Janis said that it would probably take 
at least two years before the University would have the strength 
in these areas that he felt desirable, but, he added, we are 
building. With the approval of the Common Services budget, he 
said, resources can be harnessed to realize improvements. Mr. 
Martus inquired whether more money would be required from the 
campuses during the year for personnel costs in the areas of Com- 
mon Services. Mr. Janis replied that there would be no additiona .. 
demands on the campuses for personnel costs in this area for FY 
1977. 

Chancellor Bromery mentioned that one regulation for 
the campuses which becomes expensive is the requirement of the 
Veteran's Administration that campuses keep extensive reports on 
class attendance by veterans. President Wood said that he had 
asked the Office of Management and Business Affairs to break out 
the costs of the various "users" of the data processing system in 
order to develop some kind of "user charges" and build equity 
into the system. 



Chairman Carlson then turned to the campus budgets and 
asked Chancellor Bromery to comment on the budget for UM/Amherst. 
Chancellor Bromery said that in FY 1975 the budget for the campus 
had been $70.5 million in state funds, not including the library. 
In FY 1976 the campus had received from state funds $66.4 million 
Not knowing what the budget situation would be in FY 1977, the 
campus had planned around a minimum of $65.5, figuring that any 
excess over that amount could be used for providing flexibility 
in programs. The campus had, in fact, received $68 million. 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

When it became apparent that the campus would at least receive 
level funding, the additional $900,000 was allotted to the acadeitti- 
areas, since faculty have to be hired before the budget is actual 
ly passed. The remaining $1.6 million was allotted to academic 
and student support services. The result is that it is now pos- 
sible to provide flexibility in academic programs. Some of the 
additional money was used to make those salary adjustments which 
are allowed by the state. Trustee Troy asked the status of incon 
from alumni. Chancellor Bromery replied that alumni funds are 
used for academic programs, scholarships and student activities 
such as the band, but the greatest amount goes toward scholarship's 

Chairman Carlson thanked Chancellor Bromery for his 
remarks and pointed out that an innovation in the budget this 
year is a breakdown of the state fund budget by expense category. 
He expressed his hope that next year it would be possible to have 
comparative figures which would indicate any trends or shifts in 
academic emphasis. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Chancellor Golino to comment 
on the budget for UM/Boston. Chancellor Golino said that the 
budget for the campus this year was $18.1 million, an increase of 
$600,000 over last year but still under the FY 1975 budget. He 
said that this money would be spent in the manner mandated by the 
priorities for the campus — student services, a commitment to Col- 
leges 3 and 4, and maintenance of enrollment levels in the Colleg 
of Liberal Arts. Chairman Carlson commended the campus on its 
work in keeping energy costs considerably under budget estimates 
during FY 1976. He then asked if the budget for FY 1978 could in 
elude a breakdown of the figure for the College of Liberal Arts 
into programs so that it would be possible to see where the 
emphasis was being placed. 



Chairman Carlson next asked Chancellor Bulger to high- 
light the Hospital and Medical School budgets. Chancellor Bulger 
said that, as everyone was aware, UM/Worcester is in a growth 
phase. One of his charges had been to build an administrative 
and management team. Another was to finish building a faculty 
in the clinical areas. He said the basic science faculty was 
essentially complete, but that if the Hospital is to serve the 
purposes for which it was planned and which are mandated by law, 
and is also to fit into the regional plans for the area, then it 
is necessary that it can attract patients. In order to attract 
patients, it must have a good clinical staff. The clinical staff 
at the moment is only about 50 percent of its planned size. The 
reduction in the Hospital budget from $9.9 million to $9 million 
makes it more difficult to recruit good clinical personnel. He 
said the cuts in the Medical School budget had been so extreme 
that, for example, there was no low-level person to replace light 
bulbs in projectors; there was no one to make a slide. It was 
not possible to maintain even temperature levels in all laboratorl 
No books had been bought for the library since January. He said 



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9/8/76 



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9/8/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that fourteen new beds had been opened in the Hospital in August 
and another fourteen would be added in April. It was hoped that 
very nearly 100 percent occupancy of the beds in the hospital 
would provide the maximum income possible. He expressed the hope 
that a few salary increases would be possible in the lower salary 
positions to enable the University to get and keep competent help 

At the conclusion of Chancellor Bulger's report, Chair- 
man Carlson asked for general questions. 

Trustee Gordon had praised the Amherst campus for good 
management under very difficult circumstances. Trustee Troy 
expressed the hope that it would be possible to find money in 
order to build up the library at UM/Boston. Chancellor Golino 
agreed and Chancellor Bromery commented that funds for library 
book acquisitions must now come from the operating budget. Pres- 
ident Wood explained that in previous years requests for library 
support were included in the capital outlay budget and in a sepa- 
rate category under special appropriations of the maintenance 
budget. Now it is part of the budget for each campus in the hope 
that this will result in a better chance of getting support for 
libraries . 

Trustee Conti asked how much money was spent on new 
administrative positions at UM/Boston. Chancellor Golino replied 
that although he had lost five positions in his office, he had 
only replaced two, both in community relations, which he felt 
were necessary. Chairman Carlson questioned the large reserve 
for fuel costs. Mr. Baxter said that this money was set aside 
in anticipation of a rate increase. There being no further ques- 
tions, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the FY 1977 Operating Budget for the University 
of Massachusetts as contained in Doc. T77-008. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 





Assistant /^Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-8- 



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ATTENDANCE: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

September 8, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 

Room 308, Administration Building 

Harbor Campus 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Gordon, Rowland, Shaler, and Troy; Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, Assistant to the Secretary 
recording 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Croce, Robertson and Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Abrams, Breyer , Burack, Conti, Cronin, 
Dennis, Morgenthau, and Secretary Parks representing Trustee 
Dukakis 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis , Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for University Polidy 
Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. 
Mazareas , Staff Assistant 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancel 
lor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Beatty, Associate Budget 
Director; Professor Burke, Acting Faculty Representative; Mr. 
Woodbury, Associate Provost 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Representa 
tive 

Guests : Jay Martus, Co-President of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation; Joan Pinck, Assistant Secretary, Executive Office of 
Educational Affairs 



The meeting was convened at 12:30 p.m. Chairman Healey 
introduced the first matter, a proposed change in the By-Laws of 



5049 



the Trustees (Doc. T76-051) which would formally provide for 
executive sessions. He said he had discussed this matter with 
Counsel Searson and had decided that because it was a matter of 
fundamental operating procedure, it would be discussed at this 
session of the Executive Committee but would not be considered by 
the full Board until its next meeting in October, so that each 
member of the Board would have sufficient time to think about the 
proposed amendment. 

Mr. Searson explained that the President had requested 



Trustee By-Laws 
(Doc. T76-051) 



5050 



Exec. Comm, 
9-8-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

an opinion of the Attorney General last January as to whether the 
Board were covered by the new open meeting law. That opinion had 
not yet been given, and in the meantime he suggested that the 
Board ought to have some definite language in the By-Laws on the 
procedures for executive sessions , instead of merely relying on 
parliamentary tradition as in the past. He had reviewed the 
minutes of the last ten years to obtain information concerning 
the nature of past executive sessions, which is reflected in the 
proposal. 

Mr. Searson was questioned about the motion and its 
language. Its specificity or lack of it, and the wisdom thereof, 
were discussed. The Chairman said that should the Attorney 
General rule that the University was exempt from certain portions 
of the open meeting law, he (the Attorney General) would probably 
wish to know what guidelines the University intended to use on 
its own. 

Questions were raised about some of the subjects of 
executive sessions contained in the vote, e.g., "acquisition or 
sale of property," and Counsel Searson and Trustee Gordon set 
forth examples of situations wherein conducting negotiations for 
a sale in open session would be unwise. 

Would it be wise, asked Trustee Burack, to adopt a 
policy such as this for executive sessions before the Attorney 
General makes his ruling? Suppose the ruling then conflicted 
with the policy? Counsel Searson said the ruling would have the 
effect of automatically voiding the Board's provision, should the 
two be in conflict. Would it be a good idea, Trustee Burack 
then asked, for Chairman Healey to write a letter asking for 
action on this long-overdue request for an opinion? She said 
this was a Trustee matter, and perhaps it would be better if the 
Board sought action, since the request from the administration 
seemed not to have stirred a response. Mr. Searson replied that 
the request for the opinion had been made in January, but the 
Secretary of Educational Affairs had sent a letter to the Attorney 
General countering the University's position and arguing that the 
Board should not be exempted from the open meeting law. This, 
he said, might be one reason for the delay. 



Secretary Parks said this was a public Board, and 
whether or not it were found to be covered by the law, he would 
be against any policy of not abiding by it. The essential thing 
we are all getting at, President Wood said, is whether the criterii 
allowing executive sessions are to be determined by the Board or 
by the provisions of the open meeting law. He said that this 
was the reason for the request to the Attorney General. 



Secretary Parks then sought to clarify his point. He 
said he would not be at all surprised if the Attorney General 
ruled that the Board were not covered; in fact, he said he would 



I 



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51 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be surprised if he did not rule this way. The point was not a 
legal one, he stressed: was the Board going to establish a 
system for executive sessions which would not preclude openness? 
Precluding openness was not the intent of the motion, the Chair- 
man remarked. In fact, setting forth ground rules in the event 
the University was not covered was exactly what the Committee was 
trying to do. After further discussion, it was decided that the 
motion, if passed by the Committee, would be forwarded to the 
Attorney General for his information. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
By-laws of the Board of Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts (T76-051) be amended by 
inserting after Article II, Section 5 the 
following: 

"SECTION 6. EXECUTIVE SESSIONS. By a vote 
of a majority of the Trustees present at any 
meeting, the Board may enter into executive 
session, closed to the public, to consider bids, 
collective bargaining, contract proposals, 
acquisition or sale of property, investments, 
appointments and other personnel matters, 
the granting of honorary degrees and other 
awards, attorney-client communications, and 
any other matter which might adversely affect 
or compromise the rights, liabilities, or 
operations of the University of Massachusetts." 

The next matter was a proposal to delegate the authority 
of the President to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 
in the President's absence. There was no discussion, and after 
motion was made and seconded it was 



Exec. Comm, 
9-8-76 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 
be authorized to act on behalf of the President 
of the University during his absence. 

Chairman Healey then asked Chancellor Bulger of the 
Worcester campus to explain his request that the Board of Trustees ; UM/Worcester- 
approve the revised Hospital By-Laws in February 1977, rather than! Hospital By- 



Delegation of 
Authority — 
President 's 
Office 



at today's meeting, as it had voted to do on January 7, 1976. 
Because of the opening of the Hospital, its certification for 
Medicaid programs, the FY 1976 Budget and the establishment of 
(the Hospital Management Board, the complete revision of the By- 
Laws contemplated at the time of the January 7 Trustee vote had 
|iot yet been completed. For these reasons, the campus was re- 
questing that the review period be extended to February 1977. 
There being no discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



-3- 



Laws (Doc. 
T76-034A) 



- 50, 



Exec. Coram. 
9-8-76 



UM/Worcester 
Medical 
Malpractice 
Insurance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees amend 
the vote of the Executive Committee of January 
7, 1976 by striking that portion following 
the words, "...no later than..." and sub- 
stituting therefor the following: "...February 
2, 1977 after receiving the comments and 
recommendations of the University of Mass- 
achusetts Hospital Management Board." 

The next matter dealt with payment of a premium for 
liability insurance for Medical School personnel who were not 
members of the Group Practice at UM/Worcester , and Chairman Healey 
asked Trustee Carlson to explain. Trustee Carlson said this 
matter had been brought up before the Budget and Finance Committee 
earlier in the day because of its financial implications. This 
was an example, he said, of a perfectly legitimate action on the 
University's part, for which there is ample precedent, being held 
up by an administrative bureau of the state for no good reason. 

Secretary Parks interjected, saying that Secretary 
Buckley had telephoned him before the meeting to explain his 
position, namely that the Commonwealth had not paid for mal- 
practice insurance for doctors at any time in the past. 

Mr. Janis explained that the insurance in question was 
medical malpractice insurance for non-physician patient service 
personnel: nurses, technicians and residents. The malpractice 
insurance of the physicians, who are members of the Group Prac- 
tice, is paid directly from the Group Practice and not from state 
funds. The premium for the insurance was due August 20 and the 
Comptroller had held up the invoice on the grounds that the use 
of state funds to purchase liability insurance for state employees, 
thereby benefiting them as individuals, would be improper. In 
this belief the Comptroller had evidently ignored a contrary 
opinion of the Attorney General in a similar case at Southeastern 
Massachusetts University. 



The University had been compelled in this situation, 
said Mr. Janis, to ask the insurance brokers to advance the 
premium, which would then have to be repaid within three weeks. 
In addition, it was necessary to pay $5,000 today, which was the 
amount of the earned premium from the date of the lapse to the 
present. In the event that the Comptroller continues to refuse 
to release funds, it might be necessary to transfer funds from 
the Group Practice fund account to pay the premium. He went on 
to explain the proposed votes, and there was an explanation by 
Treasurer Johnson of the ways in which other insurance policies 
had been paid for. 

This was nothing new, said the President. Ever since 
the University had received fiscal autonomy, the Comptroller had 
sought to extend the boundaries of ministerial authority. Upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 



I 






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Exec. Comm. 
9-8-76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm 
the intention and commitment of the Board of 
Trustees that general and professional liability 
insurance be purchased and maintained for all 
University employees at the Medical School and 
the Teaching Hospital and to recommend that the 
Treasurer of the University, in consultation with 
the President and the Chancellor of the Medical 
Center, be authorized to purchase and maintain 
such insurance policies as may be necessary and 
to utilize such funds including but not limited 
to state funds as may be available for the pay- 
ment of premiums for such insurance; provided, 
however, that physician malpractice coverage 
continue to be available only to Full or Voluntary 
Full members of the Group Practice and that the 
premiums or cost of such insurance continue to 
be paid through the Group Practice. 

VOTED : To recommend that, notwithstanding any provision 
of Trustee Document T75-144A to the contrary, 
the Chancellor /Dean of the Medical Center, or his 
designee, be authorized to expend such funds from 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School 
Group Practice as may be necessary in order to 
ensure that general and professional liability 
insurance for all University employees at the 
Medical School and the Teaching Hospital is 
purchased and maintained; provided, however, that 
this authority exist only until such time as the 
dispute outlined in Trustee Document T77-023 is 
resolved or until such other time as the Trustees 
may specify. 

Chairman Healey then adverted to an Administrative UM/Worcester — 
Withdrawal Policy at UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-006, T77-015) . Chan- 1 Administrative 



5063 



cellor Bulger explained that the Board had approved such policies j Withdrawal 
for the Amherst and Boston campuses but that the Worcester campus j Policy (Docs, 
had not at that time been ready to present a policy of its own. ! T77-006, T77- 
Since that time, however, the Chancellor and his staff had studied! 015) 
the Amherst policy and felt it to be satisfactory for the Wor- 
cester campus. There was no discussion, and after a motion was 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve the Rules and Regulations Governing 
Administrative Withdrawal (Doc. T77-006) at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester, as 
recommended in Doc. T7 7-015. 

Chairman Healey explained that the last item on the 



-5- 



5054 



Exec. Comm. 
9-8-76 

Mass PIRG 



Citywide 

Coordinating 

Council 



UM/Amherst — 
Department of 
Judaic Studies 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Amherst — 

Personnel 

Action 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

agenda, a discussion of the University's relationship with Mass 
PIRG, had been placed on the agenda at Trustee Spiller's request. 
But since Mr. Spiller was not present, the item would be moved 
to a later meeting of the Committee when he could be present. 

Chairman Healey asked the President if he wished to 
make any remarks on his appointment as Chairman of the Citywide 
Coordinating Council, but the President replied that he had 
planned to speak of this at the Board meeting. The Chairman said 
however, that he had discussed the appointment with Judge Garrity 
at length, and the judge had told him that he believed no one 
in the community to be more qualified. The Chairman said he did 
not believe this responsibility to be inconsistent with the 
President's obligations as President of the University. 

Trustee Abrams then was recognized, and he mentioned 
difficulties in the Department of Judaic Studies at the Amherst 
campus at UM/Amherst which had been brought to his attention. 
He asked that this matter be explored by the Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy. Trustee Troy, Chairman of the Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy, said he had no objection to 
such an exploration being on the agenda of a future meeting of 
his Committee, but said he believed it to be a campus matter. 

At 1:15 it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to consider a Personnel 
Action. 

The executive session ended at 1:20, and it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Personnel Action at UM/Amherst contained in 
Doc. T77-022. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:25 p.m. 



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IladysUKeith Hardy 
'Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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ATTENDANCE: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

September 8, 1976; 1:30 p.m. 
Room 308 Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 



Trustees Breyer, Burack, Cronin, Morgenthau, Shaler, Mrs. Blue- 
stone representing Trustee Fielding; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, 
Assistant to the Secretary, recording 

Absent Committee Member: Trustee Winthrop 



Other Trustees : Trustees Abrams and Conti 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Br ornery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Burke, Acting 
Faculty Representative 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost 

The meeting was called to order at 1:30 p.m. The first 
item consisted of Appointments with Tenure at UM/Boston and UM/ 
Worcester (Docs. T77-020, T77-021) . Vice President Lynton ex- 
plained that each of these three individuals were known to the 
faculty and administration as all three had been part-time 
faculty members, and they now were proposed as full-time appoint- 
ments with tenure. The second item on the agenda was an Award 
of Tenure (Doc. T77-002) at UM/Boston. Chairman Troy asked 



- »o 



oi/d; 



Mr. Lynton to speak to this and the other three individuals in- 
volved in executive session, since these were personnel matters. 
Accordingly it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss the 

candidate for tenure and the candidates for 
appointment with tenure 

The executive session ended at 2:05, and it was moved, 
seconded, and 



VOTED : 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 



UM/Boston and 
UM/Worcester — 
Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T77-020, 
T77-021) 

UM/Boston — 
Award of Tenure 
(Doc. T77-002) 



Executive 
Session 



r;o<56 



F & EP 
9-8-76 



Coram. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with the appointment with tenure at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston of 
those individuals named in Doc. T7 7-021. 



I 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the appointment with tenure at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Worcester of the indi- 
vidual named in Doc. T77-020. 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's award of tenure to the 
faculty member named in Doc. T77-002 at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:06 p.m. 



(f lady 4 Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



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ATTENDANCE : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

September 28, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 
Room SF1-4 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Robertson; Trustees 
Croce and McNeil; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Fielding, Abrams and Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Planning; Ms. 
Veith, Senior Associate for Academic Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Representa 



tive; Dr 



Caper, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs 



"*j 



©S7 



Guests : Professor Maurice Goodman, Chairman of the Department of 
Physiology, UM/Worcester ; Ms. Amy Barkin, Project Director, Bel- 
chertown/Monson Contracts, UM/Worcester 

The meeting was called to order at 12:30 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson asked Chancellor Bulger to bring the Committee up to 
date on developments at the Worcester campus. Chancellor Bulger 
began by describing plans for the addition of several new posi- 
tions at the school. There was soon to be a Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; there was at present a new Associate 
Dean for Community Affairs, Dr. Mason; there would soon also be 
a new Associate Dean for Allied Health, an Associate Dean for 
Social and Behavioral Sciences and a Director of Institutional 
Studies. He said he expected to make a presentation regarding 
the Medical Center administrative structure to the Organization 
Design Review Committee, and would then like to make an overall 
presentation to this Committee at a future meeting. 

Chancellor Bulger reported a 28-hour faculty retreat, 
which he said had been the first opportunity of this kind for 
members of the faculty to get together and hear each other speak 
on matters of concern and interest. Among the many things which 
had come out of this meeting, he said, was an extremely strong 
consensus that the Medical Center goals and missions adopted by 
the Trustees last year were a good expression of where the Center 
ought to go. 

The Chancellor then reported that he had spent eight 
days at the Sloan School in Dedham attending meetings aimed at 
improving the management of medical schools and hospitals. He 
described some of the details of these meetings and said he had 
found them to be most useful. 



Chancellor 's 
Report 



"5058 



Health Affairs 
9/28/76 



Governance at 

the Medical 

School 

(Doc. T77-028) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Bulger then mentioned that the Center has applied 
for a planning grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to 
help fully develop a project which would assess primary care 
comprehensively — family practice, pediatrics, nurse practitioners 
ongoing or soon to be under way either at the Center or elsewhere 
Using the biomedical computing facility at the Center, it would 
be possible to measure the cost, the quality and outcome of any 
primary care delivered at the Center. This was just the sort of 
thing the Johnson Foundation was interested in, he said, because 
they have made substantial grants around the country in an effort 
to determine whether primary care really is cheaper and more de- 
sirable than superspecialty groups. 

On the subject of Affirmative Action, which had been 
raised at the last meeting of the Committee — Chancellor Bulger 
reported that it was likely that the Center would have a person 
appointed sometime next week. Chairman Robertson asked whether 
it would be possible for the Center to have a report on Affirma- 
tive Action for the October meeting, and the Chancellor replied 
that he believed this would be possible. 

The next matter was a brief report on the first meeting 
of the Hospital Management Board. Chairman Robertson and Dr. 
Caper both reported that the meeting had been an orientation 
session, and Dr. Caper estimated that the Board would not get 
into substantive matters sooner than the third meeting. Dr. 
Caper added that he believed that the HMB was a positive addition 
to the Medical Center and would be extremely useful in helping 
it to address its many problems . 

The next matter was a discussion of the proposed Gov- 
ernance at the Medical School (Doc. T77-028) . Mr. Lynton first 
presented an historical overview of the development of this docu- 
ment. The Medical School had begun to develop it in 1974 and 
much work was done on the campus. It had been felt that the new 
Chancellor/Dean's input would be a useful thing, so that process 
was put in abeyance while the search for the Chancellor was under 
way. 

Mr. Lynton informed the Committee that Counsel Searson 
had a number of essentially editorial questions about the docu- 
ment. It was felt that it might be useful for this Committee to 
run through the document and make suggestions for its improvement 
These suggestions, along with the comments of Counsel Searson, 
would then be fed back into the document, which would be presented 
to the Committee for its actual approval at a later time. 



Chancellor Bulger remarked that this document was an 
example of a trend which has developed over the past few years 
away from authoritarianism in Medical Schools. There was a time, 
he said, when department chairmen were pretty dictatorial. Now, 
however, medical schools and hospitals were moving more toward. 



I 



I 



-2- 



I 



50S9 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Health Affairs 

9/28/76 
involvement of patients with their care and students with their 
education. This document has the advantage of drawing the balancje 
between gratifying this salutary trend, while not diluting the 
essential management powers of the administration, which he 
defined as budgetary control, the power to appoint committees, 
and the power to hire and fire department chairmen. He said the 
document meets its primary objective, but he said it would be 
necessary to assess it along the way. 

Professor Goodman informed the Committee that this 
document attempts to steer a middle course between the concept 
of "primary responsibility," as enunciated by the University 
Governance Statement, and the authoritarian model traditional to 
medical schools. Its intent was to ensure broad participation 
in the governance of the Medical School. 

The Committee then went through the document page by 
page, making comments and suggestions for improvement and refine- 
ment. After this stage of discussion, it was observed that the 
document would be reviewed before the end of two years after its 
adoption. The present plan called for the document to be re- 
drafted and ready for this Committee by the October meeting, then 
to have it adopted by the Board of Trustees at the November meet- 
ing. 

The next item was a progress report on contracts entered Interagency 
into under authority of the Interagency Agreement (Doc. T76-031C)j. Agreement 
Mr. Lynton presented a brief historical sketch of the genesis of 
the Interagency Agreement. He then asked Dr. Caper to brief the 
Committee on what had transpired since the Agreement had been 
ratified on January 7, 1976. 

Dr. Caper described several contracts which had been 
made or nearly completed with state institutions. An arrangement 
was nearly complete with the Pondville Hospital, a cancer treat- 
ment facility, whereby medical specialists at Pondville would re- 
ceive faculty appointments at the Medical School, a University 
affiliation which was useful to them and to Pondville Hospital. 
This agreement might later involve residency rotations and other 
forms of cooperation. 

Another segment of the Center's relationship with state 
institutions was with the schools for the mentally retarded at 
Monson and Belchertown. Such schools had traditionally had diffi 
culty attracting top-quality medical staff; they had consequently 
been staffed largely by partially-trained or partially-licensed 
foreign medical graduates, and the quality of the care for the 
residents had suffered accordingly. The Medical Center had suc- 
ceeded in a very short time in filling the quota of full-time 
physicians at these schools, mainly through the advantage of Uni- 
versity affiliation. In addition to primary care physicians, the 
Center had succeeded in recruiting a full-time pediatrician to 



-3- 



(Doc. T76-031C) 



5060 



Health Affairs 
9/28/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

act as Medical Director at Monson State School. 

In addition, the Center had hired two project coordi- 
nators to work at the Medical Center in coordinate services which 
the Center will take full responsibility for. These include 
pharmacology, dietary services and possibly gynecological services 
for these institutions. Further, the Center expected to appoint 
within the week a nationally-known pediatrician to act as a long- 
term developer of these types of programs, perhaps on a statewide 
basis. Part of this project will entail articulating on a nation-^ 
al basis the progress made in these areas. Dr. Caper mentioned 
other aspects of the Center's developing relationships with these 
and other state facilities, and said the Center was deliberately 
going slowly so as not to bite off more than it could chew. But 
he did say that the progress was exciting and that the relation- 
ships developing could be considered a national pilot program. 

There were questions about details of the relationships 
by members of the Committee, after which Chancellor Bulger ex- 
pressed great admiration for the success which Dr. Caper had had 
in a very short time. His work in developing these relationships 
had turned great discontent on the part of parents of residents 
at Monson and Belchertown into satisfaction at the improvement in 
the level of care provided at these facilities as a result of the 
Medical Center's recruitment efforts. Mr. Eller commented that 
anyone who was familiar with the potency of the parents' organi- 
zations in western and central Massachusetts could testify to 
what a great achievement it was to have succeeded in mollifying 
them to this extent. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 



^c^ * 




z<^£jui^ 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



i 



I 



I 



-4- 



ATTENDANCE : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

September 29, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Cronin and Morgenthau; Mrs. Bluestone 
representing Trustee Fielding; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, 
Assistant to the Secretary, recording 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Shaler and Winthrop 

Other Trustees : Trustee Conti 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Ms. Weiner, Assistant Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mr. Bench, Associate Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Burke, Acting 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Spaethling, Director of 
Graduate Studies; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

Guests : From UM/Amherst: Dean Seymour Shapiro, Dean Jeremiah 
Allen, Professor Peter Rossi; From Executive Office of Education- 
al Affairs: Ms. Joan Pinck 

The meeting was called to order at 10:07 a.m. The 
first item of business consisted of the Appointment of Senior 
Academic Administrators at UM/Amherst: the Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost (Doc. T77-025) and the Dean of the 
School of Engineering (Doc. T77-026) . Since the discussion of 
these matters involved consideration of the candidates and their 
qualifications, a motion was made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to consider the 
qualifications of the candidates for Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 
and Dean of the School of Engineering. 

The executive session began at 10:09 and ended at 10:50 
a.m. Upon motions made and seconded, it was 



5061 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Senior Academic 
Administrators 
(Doc. T77-025, 
Doc. T77-026) 



Executive 
Session 



5062 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



Status Report 
on Tenure and 
Grievance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the appointment of Dr. Paul L. Puryear as 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 
of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T77-025. 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the appointment of Dr. Russel C. Jones as 
Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor 
of Civil Engineering with tenure at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. 
T77-026. 

The second item on the agenda was a Status Report on 
the Tenure and Grievance Process . Vice President Lynton recalled 
that this report had been requested by Trustee Burack at a previ- 
ous meeting. In summary, he said there had been two substantial 
changes in the tenure-awarding process since 1972. First, the 
criteria for the award of tenure had been increased from the 
traditional three — scholarship, teaching and service — to four by 
the addition of the criterion of institutional need; second, the 
Board's tenure-granting authority had been delegated to the Pres- 
ident with the concurrence of the Board. As Chairman Troy had 
said at an earlier meeting, the notion of institutional need — 
which could be expressed by the question, "Is there a job for 
this person in his or her specialty?" — had always been implicit 
in tenure decisions, but had been formally adopted in November 
1972 in Doc. T7 3-069. The University had brought the policy into 
full practice in the 1974 cycle, and it was subsequently incorpo- 
rated into the Academic Personnel Policy (Doc. T75-125, replaced 
by Doc. T76-081). 

The delegation of authority to the President was adopted 
by the Board in June 1973 with Doc. T73-098, the University Gov- 
ernance Statement, and that delegation is still in effect. 

On the whole, said Mr. Lynton, the Academic Personnel 
Policy had been a success. It tries to strike a balance between 
consideration of the rights and needs of the individual faculty 
member and the prerogatives of the University. The process is 
very thorough and therefore very slow. The burden of quality 
control lies at the local — departmental and college — level, and 
at each higher level the insistence on quality becomes less and 
less effective unless that insistence is already there. That 
rigor is increasingly there on all campuses, he said. It has 
become increasingly clear that the effectiveness of Presidential 
and Board review is less in the area of individual quality than 
the insistence that individual tenure decisions be made in the 
context of institutional planning. 



Mr. Lynton added that, in the very few instances where 
the President made a negative decision on a campus's recommenda- 



-2- 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tion (five cases in three years), in each case protracted griev- 
ances resulted. 

With respect to grievance, there is no single document 
on the process of appeals up to the Board level which is consis- 
tent with the present structure and governance of the University. 
Although the procedures at the campus level, through each campus 
tenure and grievance committee, function smoothly, the process 
for handling grievance cases beyond the campus needs further 
clarification and definition. The Amherst document on tenure and 
grievance, approved by the Board in 1963, does not take into ac- 
count the multicampus nature of the University or the University 
governance structure. The Boston campus document was never ap- 
proved by the Board, and it does not provide for grievance beyond 
the campus. The multicampus Academic Personnel Policy Committee 
had endeavored to rectify this, but had simply run out of time in 
its first year. In its second year further consideration had 
been precluded by collective bargaining. Counsel's view, he 
added in closing, is that an appeal to the Committee on Faculty 
and Educational Policy can lead only to a recommendation to the 
President, since the authority for tenure decisions has been 
delegated to the President and therefore, while the Trustees of 
course may at any time revoke the delegation of authority, it may 
not revoke it in selective cases. 

There were several successive comments to the point tha 
this was only the beginning of the discussion, that the Committee 
would explore the subject at greater length in subsequent meet- 
ings. Trustee Burack said she wished to know more about the 
delegation of authority to the President because she believed it 
was illegal, and she wished also to know what effect the collec- 
tive bargaining process would have. She wished to hear from the 
faculty directly, she said, without "filtering" by the President. 

President Wood said that in the sixties, the Amherst 
campus was projected to grow to 35,000-40,000 students. The 
Trustees had decided, early in the seventies, that this would not 
happen, that the ceiling would be 25,000. But if the rate at 
which tenure was awarded in the sixties had been continued, he 
said, the Amherst faculty would have been 85 percent tenured by 
1975-76. 

The pioneer faculty on the Boston campus, the President 
said, had been recruited in the mid-sixties during a seller's 
market, and a set of moral commitments occurred that made insti- 
tution-building more important than scholarship, teaching or serv 
ice in consideration for tenure. This became a great issue of 
faculty morale which had to be faced and worked through when Chan 
cellor Golino joined the University three years ago. 

The intent of the Trustees in the delegation and the 
establishment of the institutional need criterion had essentially 



-3- 



Tiffc 



5063 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



5064 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been, he continued, to formalize and rationalize the process, to 
relate tenure appointments in a coherent way to institutional 
plans . 

The volume of work had apparently been a large factor, 
Trustee Morgenthau observed. The President confirmed this and 
said he was concerned at the need to maintain the quality of the 
sixties in a time of stable enrollments, while at the same time 
maintaining flexibility with respect to the next generation of 
young faculty. He added that there had been a problem with get- 
ting the departments to plan, because the budget crisis of 1976 
came along and prompted the rhetorical question of, "Why bother 
planning when it will be a budget decision in the end anyway?" 

Chancellor Bromery revealed that the department chair- 
men who had objected to the planning process in the beginning 
now saw it as an important one, because shrinking resources re- 
quire a knowledge of where they are going. The Trustees, he 
said, never see the majority of cases where a negative decision 
on tenure is made because a large percentage of these never get 
beyond the department. In most cases a negative assessment by 
the department is made early in the process and early warning has 
its natural effect of attrition. Chancellor Bromery emphasized 
that by the time the Trustees are asked to concur on a tenure ap- 
pointment, they can be sure that the faculty person has been 
rigorously dealt with by the department and every subsequent level 
up to the President and the Trustees. Chairman Troy expressed 
his satisfaction that the emphasis for quality is at the depart- 
ment level. He said he had been troubled in the past by griev- 
ance cases which had come before him where the grievant was 
astonished at the negative decision. He was pleased that tenure 
candidates with poor prospects found this out earlier in the 
game. Chancellor Bromery remarked that a decade ago, when he 
joined the University, there had been a tacit assumption that if 
you did your job and kept quiet you could expect tenure in the 
seventh year. Trustee Morgenthau agreed approvingly that that 
condition is now over. Chancellor Golino said that when he first 
joined the University tenure was almost automatic. There were 
people without Ph.D.'s who were given tenure. The department 
had screened out many candidates in 1976, and the faculty now 
view academic planning as basic to the tenure-awarding process. 



The President said that both campus grievance procedure 
documents had been developed prior to the delegation of tenure 
authority in the Governance Policy of 1973. Now every effort is 
made to seek administrative remedies to grievance cases before 
an appeal to the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy is 
sought. In practice, the extension of all levels of administra- 
tive review, including the President's decision, plus appeal to 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy can add another 
year to the final resolution of a case. This goes against the 
AAUP guidelines for the seven-year rule for tenure decision. On 



I 



I 



-4- 



I 



5065 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the other hand, the sense of common law should allow for suffi- 
cient time for review of the appeal. Trustee Morgenthau comment- 
ed that arrangements for adequate time for appeal and for extend- 
ing an appointment pending discussion of the case was an accepted 
practice . 

Trustee Burack said she believed the absolutely funda- 
mental question was the delegation of authority, with which she 
said she had enormous trouble "even in the vocabulary." 

Trustee Breyer said the tenure-awarding issue rested 
on the fact of less money. Difficult decisions had to be made 
to meet this problem, and the question is how to make the depart- 
ments and faculties make these decisions themselves. Ideally, 
he said, these hard decisions should be made on the departmental 
level, within the context of the academic plans, with the admin- 
istration stepping in only when the process of rigor is not work- 
ing. But it must be on the basis of an academic plan, Trustee 
Burack stressed, which does not exist. 



Trustee Breyer said the remedy for procedural grievance 
should be a procedural response. Substantive grievances — where 
the person says, "I didn't get tenure and I should have because 
I'm good and they said I'm not." — is much trickier to handle. 
These decisions should be made at the departmental level, respond- 
ed Trustee Morgenthau, and imaginative administration helps the 
departments make these decisions themselves. It is terribly 
embarrassing for the President to be placed in this kind of posi- 
tion, she said. Insofar as. there is some irritation in the rela- 
tionship to the top, it crystallizes that relationship on issues 
of individual personnel, which is not where the crystallization 
ought to be. She added that it personalizes it in relation to 
tenure and promotion issues, and she called that unhealthy. 

Trustee Morgenthau continued that procedural changes 
ought to take place, on the one hand, to speed up grievance 
procedures, while on the other hand getting the President off the 
hook. A sensible Board ought not to go against the President 
when he denies tenure to an individual, and the present delegation 
almost forces the crystallization at the top. The thing to do, 
she said, was to look outside and consider what other formulae 
are available. 

Professor Burke remarked that the Amherst faculty was 
also concerned about the grievance procedure and he said a series 
of sixteen recommendations to improve procedures and identify 
the locus of decisions were submitted by the Faculty Senate but 
not yet acted on. He urged early action on these recommendations 

Trustee Morgenthau said that the intensification of the 
process to ensure quality must start at the department level and 
suggested that the departments should request outside review of 



■5- 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



- 5066 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



UM/Boston — 
Guidelines for 
Graduate 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

different cases. 

Mrs. Bluestone made the point that if institutional 
need is to be invoked in a decision against tenure, it ought to 
be invoked early in the process, not at the end. The grievances 
she had seen, she said, seemed to involve cases where the indi- 
viduals' credentials under the usual criteria were well document- 
ed while the institutional need was not clearly stated. Trustee 
Burack said she believed the departmental plans must be approved 
before institutional need may be invoked, otherwise the individ- 
ual is punished for the failures of the department. There was 
further brief discussion, focusing on the need for further explo- 
rations of the options open in terms of tenure policy. 

Chairman Troy then turned the Committee's attention to 
the next item, which was to have a preliminary discussion of 
proposed Guidelines for Graduate Education at UM/Boston. Chan- 
cellor Golino recalled that the Trustees had agreed that the cam- 
pus begin to devise some guidelines for the gradual development 
of innovative graduate programs at UM/Boston. This document was 
the work of the ad hoc committee which had been formed for that 
purpose. He was pleased with the report, he said, which leaves 
the door open for the establishment of traditional programs, whic 
basically is directed toward interdisciplinary programs without 
the need to create separate departments or additional admin- 
istrative structures. He described salient features of the plan 
which set it apart from the traditional route of development. 
This was a unique proposal, he said, which addresses the questions 
facing the Boston campus. The proposed plans call for the devel- 
opment of graduate education on a gradual basis, without competing 
with established institutions or the Amherst campus. 

Mr. Lynton commented that this document was an initial 
report which attempts to define an underlying philosophy for a 
plan which would be developed as a next step and which would 
precede the development of any specific program. It is understood 
by the campus and the President's Office that these proposed 
guidelines are presented to the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy as preliminary information on the thinking of the 
faculty and the direction they would propose for the future devel 
opment of graduate education. Trustee Morgenthau said she would 
certainly consider the document as absolutely preliminary, be- 
cause she would need to know much more about the progress being 
made in strengthening the undergraduate programs, the efforts of 
the merger, the quality of the departments that would be involved 
in development of the multi-disciplinary graduate programs, their 
strengths and viability at the present, and so on. She said she 
would be reluctant to agree in principle to any program for 
graduate education without more information about these matters. 
Trustee Burack agreed with this view. 

Professor Spaethling explained that the President and 
the Trustees had informed the campus in 1972 that they would not 



-6- 



I 



I 



I 



506? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

look with favor on any more individual graduate programs without 
an overall projection of how many and what type of programs the 
campus recommended. The document is the result of a year's work 
and constitutes only the first part of a master plan. The seconc 
part will contain projections of the type and number of inter- 
disciplinary programs, and would be ready for presentation in the 
early spring. The document before the Committee was a philosoph- 
ical statement, which was based on the recommendations of the 
National Board of Graduate Education issued in 1975 about the 
types and quality of programs for development nationally. 

The document acknowledges the desire of the faculty to 
have some kind of graduate programs, Professor Spaethling con- 
tinued. The programmatic and structural recommendations are in 
anticipation of this and are suggested for development over the 
next five years. 



There was further discussion, in which Mr. Lynton point- 
ed out that the traditional one-year master's program was a thing 
of the past. He said this document recognized this and tried to 
strike a balance between that type of program and the traditional 
doctoral program. Trustee Morgenthau said she was extremely 
reluctant to see yet another phase of expansion before the con- 
solidation of the undergraduate liberal arts component on the 
Boston campus is completed (see April 7, 1976 Board of Trustees 
minutes). She could not see the resources, material or intellec- 
tual, for the choices contemplated in the document. The proposal 
does not grow from existing internal resources, but is "parachuted" 
in from the outside. She said that the report does not tell the 
Board what the intellectual resources are at present on the under- 
graduate level on which to build these graduate programs. The 
document justified an add-on, and therefore it was not an educa- 
tional document, but a bureaucratic one. 

Chairman Troy pointed out that the document did say 
that there ought to be careful scrutiny of resources before any 
specific program is approved. Trustee Burack said she also 
missed an inventory of the resources of the whole University, 
as well as of the campuses. She called the document an interest- 
ing document which took far too long to produce, but she said 
she would prefer something written more crisply, with more spe- 
cifics . 

Mr. Lynton said this document was an attempt to say in 
a very general fashion, "If the campus is ready to go into 
graduate work, then these are the directions in which it ought 
to go." If anything, he said, it was too specific. Chairman 
Troy suggested that it would be possible to review the philosoph- 
ical directions set forth in the document, but Trustee Morgenthau 
said she did not wish even to begin such a discussion without 
having a report on the solidity of the undergraduate programs 
first . 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



-7- 



- 5068 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



UM/ Amherst — 

Preliminary 

Graduation 

List 

(Doc. T77-029) 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy said that the Board had made a commitment 
to the idea of studying and refining graduate programs on the 
Boston campus, after which presentations of specific programs 
would be made. Secretary Hardy called the Committee's attention 
to a statement of priorities for the Boston campus (Doc. T75-167) 
which had been approved by the Board in August 1975, after a year 
of discussion by the Long-Range Planning Committee. These priori 
ties included selective, gradual development of graduate programs 
after the first two priorities, relative to strengthening under- 
graduate education, extended day and summer programs and increas- 
ing access. While these priorities were being addressed, the fac 
ulty and administration were simultaneously carrying on the pre- 
liminary thinking on the graduate education priority, which was 
now being presented to the Committee for its early information 
while the process of development was in its beginning stages . 

There was further discussion of whether this document 
was too vague or too specific and whether it was appropriate at 
all. Trustee Morgenthau said she would want much more evidence 
of progress in priorities 1 and 2 before she would consider devel- 
oping graduate programs. She said in terms of institutional need 
at this level, she would say that the institution does not yet 
need expansion of graduate programs. Trustee Conti agreed that 
the Committee should first determine how the campus has dealt with 
the first two priorities before talking about expanding graduate 
programs. Ms. Weiner commented that it is not necessarily a 
valid assumption that graduate education development would be at 
the expense of undergraduate education. Trustee Cronin pointed 
out the tentative character of the guidelines and observed that 
it was not a proposal, only a philosophical statement. He ob- 
served that everyone was taking it much too seriously, when it was 
meant for the committee merely to "chew-on" some of the ideas 
presented. Mr. Lynton concluded by describing the kinds of infor- 
mation already asked of, and forthcoming from, the Boston campus 
about priorities 1 and 2 which is planned to be reviewed by the 
Long-Range Planning Committee. 

The next item of business was the approval of the 
Preliminary Graduation List for September 1976 at UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T7 7-029). There was no discussion and upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the preliminary graduation lists for September 
1976 at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T77-029, subject 
to the completion of all requirements as certified 
by the Recorder of that campus. 

Upon motion made and seconded at 12:40, it was then 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss two tenure 
grievance appeals. 



-8- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The executive session ended at 12:45 and the meeting 
was immediately adjourned. 



£o^ 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



5069 



F&EP Comm. 
9/29/76 



-9- 



5070 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



\ 



NOT USED 



I 



I 



ATTENDANCE: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

September 29, 1976; 1:30 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Rowland; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Clark, Conti; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Breyer and Spiller 



Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cooley, 
Associate Vice President for Analytical Studies; Ms. Weiner, 
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chan- 



cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Burke, Acting 
Faculty Senate Representative; Mr. Venman, Director, Continuing 
Education, and Associate Provost 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Steamer, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Spaethling, Director of Graduate 
Studies 

UM/Worcester : Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 



The meeting was called to order at 1:40 p.m. Vice 
President Lynton introduced Ms. Sheila Weiner to the Committee. 
Chairman Rowland asked that the first item of business be a 
discussion of a tentative calendar and agenda items for Committee 
meetings for the current academic year. One of the unfinished 
items, she said, was the further discussion of University "camps, 
posts and stations." She reminded Chancellor Bromery that the 
Committee in March had requested more information on long-range 
plans for these stations. Chancellor Bromery said Dean Whaley of 
the College of Food and Natural Resources is developing these 
materials, since the field stations administered by the Amherst 
campus fall under his area of responsibilities. The Dean had 
also been discussing with Mr. Lynton the matter of sea grant 
activities. Mr. Lynton said it would be two months or so before 
a report concerning sea grants could be ready. With this excep- 
tion, the Chancellor said he expected to provide information to tt 
Committee fairly soon. 

Chairman Rowland informed the Committee that Vice 
President Robinson had suggested that a joint meeting of the 



;o?i 



Tentative 
Calendar of 
Agenda Items 



le 



" 5072 



LRP Comm. 
9/29/76 



Committee 
Retreat 



Report of 
Advisory Coun- 
cil on the 
Fine Arts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Committee with the long-range planning committees of the State 
and Community Colleges Trustees might prove valuable to all con- 
cerned. It was the sense of the Committee that such a meeting 
would be desirable and might take place in the winter, possibly 
in January. 

Chairman Rowland stated that the Committee should now be 
looking for reports from the Boston campus on implementation of 
the enrollment and priority guidelines established by the Board, 
including information on the future growth of the College of Publi 
and Community Service and the College of Professional Studies as 
well as the development of new programs in these colleges. Mrs. 
Robinson added that since only one program has been developed to 
date in the College of Professional Studies, this would be a good 
time to begin reviewing future program proposals. 

The idea of planning a Committee retreat was well re- 
ceived by the members for sometime in November. Trustee Carlson 
asked that dates be established as soon as possible in order that 
Trustees could reserve time on their calendars. 

Chairman Rowland then turned the discussion to the Report 



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of the Advisory Council on the Fine Arts and called attention to 
a draft policy statement. Trustee Carlson suggested that Mr. 
Cooley 's memorandum, estimating the resource requirements of the 
various recommendations of the Council's report, be used as a 
basis from which to discuss the report. 

At Chairman Rowland's request, President Wood prefaced 
the discussion by stating that he found the report well executed, 
with a good balance between general and specific recommendations. 
Chairman Rowland said she had acknowledged the report by writing 
Professor Ackerman expressing the appreciation and gratitude of 
the Committee and she planned, with the approval of the Committee 
to send letters of thanks to the individual members of the Counci 



Chairman Rowland then asked Mr. Cooley to summarize the 
resource implications of the recommendations of the Report of the 
Advisory Council on the Fine Arts. Mr. Cooley said that of the 
84 specific recommendations of the Council, he had tried to 
identify those that the Council had felt were critical either to 
maintain present quality or to bring existing programs with 
potential up to threshold levels, and to estimate the cost of 
doing this. He said that to accomplish these critical needs would 
not involve substantial budget increases; some could probably be 
accomplished without additional funding; others may require a 
reallocation of funds; and a few will require additional staff and 
renovations to present buildings. The cost for artist-in-residence 
programs, visiting professorships or master teachers, or additional 
scholarships and fellowships could not be determined, he said, 
without additional information, but again he did not think these 
programs would necessarily require substantial increases in 
resources. 



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Mr. Cooley said two recommendations if fully implemented 
would have substantial resource implications; first, that increased 
opportunity be provided for non-arts majors to participate in 
'arts programs; and second, that additional physical facilities be 
provided, especially at the Harbor Campus. The first recommendation, 
he said, represented a change in educational philosophy and an- 
ticipates that every non-arts major would have an opportunity 
to take at least two arts courses. This he estimated could cost 
between $2 and $3 million for instructional support alone. 

Trustee Carlson asked if there were figures to indicate 
student interest in the arts. Mr. Lynton replied that there is 
great student interest and that students have to be turned away 
from the arts courses on both the Boston and Amherst campuses. 
He said the issue is the amount of emphasis to be placed on the 
arts in relation to other disciplines in Boston and to professiona 
programs at Amherst. Trustee Carlson asked what the campuses' 
best guess was as to the number of non-arts majors who would take 
iarts courses. Chancellor Bromery said that most students are 
interested in the arts; the question is in which programs their 
interests lie. Although enrollment figures were readily available 
said Mr. Alfange, figures on the number of students turned away 
would have to be compiled. Trustee Clark asked how these programs 
were funded and whether money might be available from sources such 
as the National Endowment for the Arts. Mr. Venman said most 
of the federal money available requires matching money from the 
state. Although private sources are available for certain ac- 
tivities, such as artist-in-residence programs, it is difficult 
to obtain operating money. He said there is, of course, the 
possibility of generating money within the Fine Arts Center. 



Mrs. Robinson asked if there were any way to determine 
what courses were elected as the second choices of students 
turned away from arts courses and whether reallocation of personne 
from the former to the latter seemed reasonable. Professor Burke 
said it would be very difficult to answer such a question. 

Chancellor Golino stated UM/Boston arts offerings were 
limited, and the arts are considered as part of the liberal arts 
programs and do not emphasize professional preparation. He said 
there was much taleit and little opportunity in this area at the 
Harbor Campus. In the last year the number of majors has in- 
creased from 322 to 380. The interest at UM/Boston, he said, is 
in the studio arts programs. 

Chairman Rowland said that even with the recommendations 
of the Report of the Advisory Council on the Fine Arts there was 
still not enough information to determine priorities. Trustee 
Carlson asked, however, if the draft policy statement could not 
be supplemented by a statement that the Committee would like to 
see the campuses take a hard look at the reallocation of resources 
;to provide early funding for the critical needs, and then ask the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

campuses at a later date to study further those recommendations 
which would require substantial resource requirements. 

Mr. Callahan added that the policy statement recently 
published by the state Board of Education would undoubtedly impact 
on the allocation of funds at the elementary and secondary school 
levels, since it recommends the infusion of the performing and 
visual arts into the total school curriculum. 

Chairman Rowland said that she would like to reorder the 
recommendations of the report and change the date for responses 
from April to February, and include an additional item on the 
Fine Arts Center, how it should function and what the programs 
should be in order that the Center could become a real resource 
for the community as well as for the University. Chairman Rowland 
quoted from the minutes of the November 19, 1973 Long-Range 
Planning meeting indicating this intent: 

"The Chairman began the discussion of the 
future of the fine arts at the University by 
commenting that the new Fine Arts Center now 
being completed at UM/Amherst provides that 
campus with the chance to support the develop- 
ment of the arts throughout the University, the 
five-college area, and the entire Commonwealth." 



Discussion ensued with regard to the two potentially 
competitive elements of the Center — as a resource for the community 
and as an instructional facility — and how conflicts between the 
two could be resolved. It was noted that the conflict was one of j 
times and dates and that although a resolution had not yet been 
found, it seemed that the Center could be used at certain times 
primarily as an instructional facility while at other times it 
could be used chiefly as a performing arts center. Certain space 
allocations could also be made to alleviate conflicts. In the 
summer, for instance, it could be used primarily for community 
purposes, while during the academic year instructional purposes 
would take preference. 



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adopted, 



It was then moved that the statement as amended be 
The motion was seconded and it was 



VOTED : To adopt the following Policy Statement on 
Planning for the Fine Arts: 



"The past five years have seen a 75% growth in fine arts 
enrollments at the University and a 92% increase in the 
number of graduate and specialized degrees candidates. 
With completion of the Fine Arts Center at Amherst, the 
University has an opportunity to give important support 
to the development of the arts in the Commonwealth and 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

throughout New England. In the course of the next five 
years, the nature of the fine arts programs at Boston 
will be determined and construction of the Arts and 
Sciences building can make full development possible. 
Budgetary constraints and hiring freezes, however, 
threaten the quality of both present and future programs. 
In this context of opportunity and constraints, the Board 
of Trustees reaffirms its commitment to the importance 
of the fine arts in the educational program of the 
University, welcomes the report of the Advisory Council 
on the Fine Arts and its emphasis on broad undergraduate 
participation and selective graduate development, and 
urges continued program evaluation and planning in these 
areas. Specifically, the Board requests 

1. That the Advisory Council be warmly commended 
for their extraordinary contribution to the Uni- 
versity and asked to remain available for advice 
and consultation during the period of review. 

2. That departmental, school, and campus plans 
now in preparation be reviewed by the appropriate 
Board committees in the context of the Council 
recommendations . 

3. That the President and Chancellor initiate a 
careful review of arts facility planning at the 
Harbor Campus including the implications of pos- 
sible joint program activities with other educa- 
tional and cultural institutions. 

4. That the President and Chancellor review and 
report to the Long Range Planning Committee the 
steps necessary to establish the Fine Arts Center 
as a major resource serving both the University 
community and the Commonwealth. 

5. That the report and recommendations of the 
Advisory Council be referred to the Chancellors 
for appropriate campus review and comment. The 
Chancellors are asked to submit a detailed res- 
ponse to the Long Range Planning and Faculty and 
Educational Policy Committees as soon as possible 
and in any case by February 1, 1977. This res- 
ponse should give priority attention to the further 
identification of critical needs and the resources 
required to meet them." 



Chairman Rowland then introduced the final item of 
agenda, the Guidelines for Development of Graduate Education at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston . Chairman Rowland 
asked President Wood to open discussion of this topic. President 



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UM/Boston — 
Guidelines for 
Development of 
Graduate Educa- 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Wood recalled that the Committee had set priorities for the develop 
merit of the Boston campus. He said the report was general, 
setting forth the direction and character which campus personnel 
believe graduate programs should take. He then asked Mr. Lynton 
to elaborate on the report. At the meeting of the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy earlier that day, he said, 
discussion centered on whether these guidelines were consistent 
with the Trustees' policy statement of priorities for the Boston 
campus, which placed growth and strengthening of undergraduate 
education as higher priorities than the selective development of 
graduate programs. Members of that committee, continued Mr. 
Lynton, expressed a reluctance to consider these guidelines with- 
out first knowing the extent of progress on the other priorities. 

Mr. Lynton said that these guidelines represented the 
preliminary philosophical directions of campus thinking about 
graduate education. It is not an action document nor does it 
represent imminent development of specific programs, but rather 
it is a first step in a master planning process which is brought 
to the attention of the Trustees for their information and comments 



Trustee Conti said that, in light of the appointment of 
a Dean of Graduate Studies, she did not feel it was overreacting 
to be concerned that graduate programs would be developed at the 
expense of undergraduate education. Mr. Lynton corrected Trustee 
Conti by pointing out that Professor Spaethling is Director of 
Graduate Studies and not Dean. 

Chancellor Golino said these guidelines had been 
developed in accordance with the Trustee priorities set for the 
campus. He added that he did not feel that graduate education 
should be viewed as being detrimental to undergraduate programs. 



Trustee Clark said that, as a member of the community, 
she felt very comfortable with this moderate development of 
graduate programs. She had been very happy to see extended-day 
programs being developed, and felt that the summer program had 
been extremely successful. Trustee Carlson said he was pleased 
with the philosophical approach taken by the Committee which 
drafted the recommendations. His major concern, he said, was the ' 
matter of resources. He felt he could not endorse the report until 
he was certain that the implications of the report would not have 
the effect of reducing the amount of resources available for 
undergraduate programs. Mrs. Robinson stated her concern about 
the table on page 36 showing graduate development under an 
assumption of "no growth." She said that the two newest colleges, 
need to grow and that the Trustees' priority statement suggested 
that growth in these colleges must take precedence over graduate 
programs. She supported the criteria and approaches in the report 
and suggested that they be applied to existing graduate programs. 
Chancellor Golino said that a review of existing graduate programs 
was implicit in the report, since they must conform to the guide- 
lines set. He added that with the establishment of the Kennedy 



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Library on the campus, it was necessary that graduate programs be 
developed to make use of this important resource. 

Chairman Rowland said the first commitment of the Boston 
campus was to undergraduate education and that graduate education 
was a lesser priority. She said she was not convinced that the 
other priorities had yet been fully met. In particular, she said 
she was still waiting for a report on counseling, advising and 
support services. 



Mr. Spaethling said the guidelines had been prepared by 
the campus in answer to a Trustee mandate for a statement on 
graduate education. He stated that there had been a two-year 
moratorium on graduate programs at UM/Boston. The report, he 
said, was an attempt to indicate the campus view of what was 
reasonable for the campus to attempt in the way of graduate pro- 
grams with existing resources. He stated his belief that graduate 
programs were necessary for academic survival, both to attract 
students and to attract faculty. He said the campus needs 
academic visibility and he does not believe undergraduate programs 
will suffer with a small graduate program. He said he would like 
to submit at a later date a master plan showing how the campus 
would implement the proposed guidelines. This would contain an 
approximation of the kinds of programs and the numbers of program^, 
all interdisciplinary in nature, which the campus would like to 
develop. He said he felt these programs would be both economically 
and academically feasible. 

The area committees referred to in Recommendation 5 

of the Guidelines would have three functions 1) a creative role 

in the recommendation of new programs, 2) a review role in examining 
existing programs, and 3) a role as the departmental homes for th£ 
interdisciplinary programs once they have been approved. He said 
much thought had gone into the development of these guidelines, 
and unless the Graduate Education Master Plan Committee can talk 
about the actual programs, it cannot be more specific. Part II 
of the master plan will include a projection identifying specific 
programs and estimating resource requirements, clientele and need 
He said he sees an enormous opportunity to move ahead and believe^ 
steps should be taken to do so. 

Trustee Clark said she did not see the 7 percent commit-- 
ment to graduate programs as excessive and she felt it was necessary 
to develop graduate programs to take full advantage of the Kennedy 
Library. Mr. Callahan said he supported the commitments to both 
access and undergraduate education, but he also supported the 
modest development of graduate programs. He, too, said that the 
Kennedy Library was a resource which should not be overlooked. 

Provost Steamer also emphasized that the proposal was 
modest and would not interfere with undergraduate growth. He 
said if additional resources were not forthcoming, and growth con- 
tinued in the College of Public and Community Services and the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

College of Professional Studies, the College of Liberal Arts would 
have to be cut back, whether or not graduate programs were provided . 
He said the extended-day program is growing and the entire campus 
is now open until 10 p.m. It is expected that next year the 
summer program will double. 

Mrs. Robinson stated that in the event there should be 
no opportunity for further enrollment growth, a general review 
of campus planning and envelopment would be necessary. Chairman 
Rowland concluded the discussion by reminding the Chancellor of 
the Policy Statement on priorities as approved by the Board. 



There being no further discussion on the subject 
meeting was adjourned by the Chairman at 3:15 p.m. 



the 



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($ladys(j Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE 
COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

September 29, 1976; 3:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Carlson; President 



Wood; Trustees Dennis, Gordon, Rowland and Troy: Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, Assistant to the 
Secretary, recording 

Absent Trustees: Trustees Croce, Shearer 



Office of the President: Mr. Janis , Vice President for 



Management and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant 
Vice President; Mr. Kaplan, Associate Vice President for 
Organization and Management; Mr. O'Leary, Associate Counsel; 
Mr. Hester, Associate Vice President; Ms. Frankel, Staff 
Assistant; Ms. Veith, Senior Associate for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; 
Professor Burke, Acting Faculty Representative; Mr. Bishop, 
Director of Procurement; Miss Asack, Office of Chancellor 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget 



and Control; Mr. Haney, Director of Procurement 
UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Smith, Faculty 



Representative; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Mr. Greene, Acting Affirmative Action Officer; 
Mr. Schiff, Director of Procurement 

The meeting was called to order at 3:35 p.m. and the 
first item was consideration of the FY 1978 Maintenance Budget 
Request Summary (Doc. T77-024) . Chairman Carlson recognized 
President Wood for some introductory remarks. The President 
began by recalling that this was the eighth budget he had had 
the responsibility of presenting to the Trustees. He said that 
he well understood that offering a budget that continues a patterr 
of increase, when in the present year the state had not completely 
recovered from its recession, would raise justifiable concerns. 
The total appropriation requested was $124.4 million, compared to 
the $116.2 million requested for FY 1977, compared with the 1970 
budget of $50.8 million. He said that is a 250 percent increase 
in raw numbers. However, there were two factors to consider. 
One was inflation. Taking the Chronicle of Higher Education's 



5073 



FY 1978 

Maintenance 

Budget Request 

Summary 

(Doc. T77-024) 



080 



31 



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9/29/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



recent educational dollar index, an index constructed according 
to the purchases and wages peculiar to higher education, there 
is a deflation factor of .6 percent. When applied to the FY 1978 
request, the $124.4 million requested is equivalent to $74 million 
.in 1970 dollars, only a 46 percent increase. President Wood said 
the second factor to consider was that there had been 21,000 FTE 
jstudents in the University in 1970; today there are over 30,000 
FTE. Dealing in current dollars, the per capita, per student FTE 
expenditure in 1970 was $2,377; today, even with approximately 
a 9,000 FTE increase in students, it is $4,111. But taking per 
capita and the educational deflation index together, that reduces 
for FY 1978 the per student cost, in 1970 dollars, to $2,467, or 
only $90 more per student than in 1970. Considering the knowledge 
explosion, the growth of physical plant, the transformation of 
the educational enterprise, the opening of the Medical Center, 
the doubling of enrollment at Boston, the "get going" cost of new 
institutions, one of which is a Medical School, this is a prudent 
and defensible budget, he stressed. When one compares the Univer- 
sity budget request to the increase in the total state budget and 
compares it to the increase in the total educational expenditures 
of the state, including the cost of Chapter 766, the result is a 
reduction in the portion of those budgets that the university 
represents. 

The objective of this budget, President Wood said, was 
to catch up on inflation and try to return to normalcy and get 
back out of the vacancy problems the University had last year. 
The President then called on Vice President Janis . 

Mr. Janis said that the early seventies was a period of 
expansion of budgets and the mid-seventies was a period of aus- 
terity. One legacy of the middle seventies was the notion of 
public accountability, and another was the notion of tying plan- 
ning to budgeting. A key objective this year was the filling of 
vacancies. In filling vacancies, the University would be able to | 
recover some of the program content of the past. It would also 
be able to make repairs to the physical plant, which had suffered 
greatly during the austerity period. Further management improve- 
ments also were expected this year. 



Mrs. Hanson then spoke, setting forth the respective 
amounts for the campuses and for other special appropriation 
accounts. Since the Chancellors would address their own budgets, 
she addressed the appropriations requested for the President's 
Office, the Institute for Governmental Services and the Specials 
category. She described the figures, and the reasons therefor, 
for each of these categories. There were questions and subsequent 
clarification and discussion of the comparisons between FY 1978 
and the previous two years. Mr. Janis then set forth the changes 
in the figures requested for funding of the Common Services 
account and the reasons therefor. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson called on Chancellor Bromery to 
address the Amherst budget request. Chancellor Bromery mentioned 
that the request was based on a 300 FTE increase in undergraduate 
enrollment and a 300 FTE decrease in graduate enrollment. Even 
with this budget, there would still be 250 position vacancies, 
he said. With continued vacancies, the appropriation would be 
7 percent less than FY 1975 in terms of FY 1976 dollars. The 
campus's first priority was in the academic area, then deferred 
maintenance and upgrading of student support services. He then 
set forth other intended priorities addressed by this budget 
request. There were questions, answers and discussion of the 
details. 

Chancellor Golino then spoke about the UM/Boston budget 
request. He also pointed out the effects of inflation. He 
observed that the FY 1977 budget was $400,000 less than the 
appropriation of FY 1975, this with the greatly enlarged offerings 
in the College of Public and Community Service and the College of 
Professional Studies. Yet there are still 160-190 vacant posi- 
tions. The increase requested filling of essential vacancies, 
but would still leave 120 position vacancies. He then described 
the intended priorities of the budget request. Again there were 
questions and discussion, particularly on the problems brought 
about by the Legislature's policy of authorizing positions 
without tying them to funding and the problem of the time for 
recruitment of faculty being ahead of the state budget cycle. 

Chancellor Bulger then described the priorities of the 
Medical Center, including continuing education of the physicians 
of the Commonwealth, allied health and the filling of vacancies. 
He said he hoped to be able to fill thirteen positions this year, 
and said he was asking for 20 more which he said was consistent 
with the planned faculty size. There also needed to be some in- 
vestment in the affiliated community hospitals which would serve 
to tie the University to the hospitals in a significant way. 

Speaking to the Hospital, Chancellor Bulger explained 
the projected census of the Hospital. Setting forth the number 
of positions involved per bed, the Chancellor observed that this 
figure was decreasing to the point where the investment in the 
Hospital was beginning to pay off. There was discussion by the 
Trustees and questions were addressed to the Chancellor. There 
were no further questions or discussion, and a motion was made, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve the Maintenance Budget Request for 
Fiscal Year 1978 as set forth in Trustee 
Document T77-024. 



50 



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9/29/76 



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UM/Worc ester — 
Fund Transfer 
(Doc. T77-027) 



Status Report on 
Affirmative 
Action in 
Purchasing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson and Trustee Rowland complimented both 
the campuses and the University Budget Office for the quality of 
the presentation, which was said to be getting better each year. 

The next matter consisted of a proposed Fund Transfer 
at UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-027) . There was no objection, and it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize the transfer of $1,374,000 from 
subsidiary account 01 to subisdiary account 
02 of appropriation item 7411-1006, the 
University Hospital at Worcester. 

The next agenda item was a Status Report on Affirmative 
Action in Purchasing . Mr. Janis recalled that at the previous 



I 



meeting of this Committee, a discussion took place of affirmative 
action as part of purchasing. The Board had thereupon requested 
a status report on affirmative action and the development of a 
program for each campus. Today he said a status report was avail- 
able, and in November a detailed program was to be submitted. 



Mr. Janis pointed out that Executive Order 11246 required 
that all general contractors which do business with government, 
and all higher educational institutions which receive grants over 
a certain amount, must practice equal opportunity in employment. 
The purchasing manual which the Trustees had approved in August 
contained within it a commitment to affirmative action in purchas- 
ing which would encourage participation of minority- and women- 
owned businesses in University procurement. This goes beyond the 
federal requirements, he pointed out, which relate totally to 
employment . 



Mr. Janis then described the actions which the campuses 
had taken to encourage bids from minority-owned businesses, in- 
cluding the vehicles for dissemination of such encouragement. The 
result of the efforts had been, he said, not good statistically, 
though they are improving. He mentioned several reasons for this, 
including the relatively small number of such businesses, the 
location of the businesses, and the fact that many of the busi- 
nesses provide goods and services which the University cannot use. 
Other constraints included a difficult state bonding requirement 
and the slow state payment process. 

Chairman Carlson said he had been pleased at the extent 
of the efforts undertaken by the University in this direction. 
It shows, he said, that the University has already been aware of 
and been involved in rectifying, this problem. 

Trustee Dennis disagreed with the Chairman's positive 
analysis, saying that he was result-oriented, and the results of 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

these efforts had been poor. If the University had spent the 
same amount of money on educational programs, he said, and gotten 
the same results, it would be severely criticized. He did not 
see that the results justified the amount of effort. To this 
Chairman Carlson responded that the University could not control 
the facts in the report, given the constraints mentioned. Trustee 
Dennis reiterated that he had no objection to the facts in the 
report, only that the results did not justify satisfaction with 
the University's efforts. President Wood agreed that there was 
a lot of work to be done yet, and major investments to be made 
in communication. Chancellor Bromery also mentioned several 
other measures which could be taken, including expediting pay- 
ment, encouraging minority vendors to locate offices in western 
Massachusetts, and other measures. Further discussion occurred, 
after which the meeting was adjourned at 5:02 p.m. 



B & F Comm. 
9/29/76 





Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board 
of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

October 6, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Room Al-1 Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Healey; Trustees Carlson, 



Gordon, Robertson, Rowland, Shaler, Spiller and Troy; Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, Assistant to the Secretary, 
recording 

Absent Committee Members: President Wood; Trustee Croce 



Other Trustees: Trustees Abrams , Breyer, Burack, Clark, Conti, 



Cronin, Dennis, Eddy, McNeil, Morgenthau, Shearer, Mrs. Blues tone 
representing Trustee Fielding, and Secretary Parks representing 
Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President: Mr. Janis, Vice President for Manage- 



ment and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academ- 
ic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. Cass, 
Executive Assistant to the President and Director of the Institute 
for Labor Affairs; Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant Vice President; 
Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. White, The Assistant to the 
President 



UM/ Amherst 



Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director; 
Professor Sulzner, Faculty Representative; Ms. Tillona, Special 
Assistant to the Chancellor; Mr. Federow, Graduate Student Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 



Control; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative 
UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Smith, Faculty Represen- 
tative 

The meeting of the Executive Committee was called to 
order at 11:15 a.m. by Chairman Healey. The first item on the 
agenda was a proposed Amendment to Article IV, Section 2, of the 
Trustee By-Laws (Doc. T76-051) . Before addressing the proposal, 
Chairman Healey recalled that the Committee had, at its last meet- 
ing, recommended to the Board an addition to the By-Laws providing 
for circumstances under which the Board may enter executive ses- 
sion. The Chairman had asked that the vote of the Board on this 
matter be delayed until the October meeting to give Trustees time 
to consider it and to respond in writing if they chose. He ob- 
served that, at his request, Trustee Breyer had offered several 
alternative wordings of the proposed amendment, and he asked him 
to recapitulate. 



. 5081 



Amendments to 
Trustee By-Laws 
(Doc. T76-051) 



5086 



Exec. Comm. 
10/6/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Breyer began by observing that there is at 
present no Trustee rule or by-law to prevent the Board from enter-' 
ing executive session for any reason it wishes, and he said he 
had drafted "sunshine by-laws" which would have the effect of 
defining appropriate reasons. He recalled that a request was 
pending before the Attorney General for an opinion as to whether 
Chapter 303, Section 1, of the Acts of 1975, the so-called "open 
meeting law", applied to the Board of Trustees. There were two 
distinct possible outcomes of this request: either the law could 
be found to apply to the Board, or it could be found not to apply. 
If the law did apply, then no by-law would be needed. But if it 
did not apply, a "sunshine by-law" would be necessary to ensure 
that the Board not have the discretion to enter executive session 
on any pretext. 

There were three alternatives, he said: first, to sim- 
ply adopt the Open Meeting Law as a by-law; second, to modify it 
to suit the University's particular situation; or third, to have 
no by-law at all. The third he did not believe was desirable. 
He did not think it would be wise to adopt the state law as a by- 
law — again in the event the state law did not already apply to 
the University — because it did not provide for circumstances whicfy 
the Board of Trustees might face. 

Historically, he said, open meeting laws were not direct 
ed to institutions like Universities, but toward regulatory agen- ! 
cies like the Interstate Commerce Commission. One problem with 
the law insofar as the Board of Trustees is concerned is that it 
makes no provision for holding executive sessions to discuss mat- 
ters the open discussion of which would constitute a clearly un- 
warranted invasion of privacy. 

Another circumstance involving the Board would be nego- 
tiation with a private contactor. Trustee Breyer said it would 
be unfortunate if the contactor could conduct its business in 
private while the Board had to conduct its business openly, be- 
cause that would put the Trustees at a disadvantage. The law 
provided only for executive sessions in negotiation over real 
property, but the University at times negotiated for property 
other than real property. 

Another problem, he said, was that the law does not 
provide for executive sessions to discuss such personnel matters 
as the professional qualifications of faculty for purposes of 
hiring, promotion, etc. If the Trustees could not conduct discus- 
sions of these matters privately, he said, the result would be 
that such discussions would be made solely by the administration, 
because the Trustees would be reluctant to discuss them in public 
Finally, he mentioned the problem of not being able to discuss 
honorary degrees, since the state law does not provide for that 



-2- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

circumstance as a reason for entering executive session. The 
likelihood of embarrassment to individuals and to the University 
in the Trustees' selecting some nominees and not others, he said, 
was obvious. 

Chairman Healey called this an excellent summation of 
the problem, and he recognized Trustee Burack for her remarks. 
Trustee Burack said she was in "absolute, fundamental" disagree- 
ment with the premise of the proposed by-law. She was against 
"changing law by by-law". Several constitutional and public 
interest lawyers had told her, she reported, that if the Legisla- 
ture had intended the University to be exempt from the law, the 
exemption would have been included in the statute. No public 
body has the right, she continued, to decide which laws it will 
obey, whether the laws are convenient or not. Legislators and 
only Legislators can make changes in the law. She concluded by 
saying that, in her view, the Trustees were obliged to obey the 
law and that the Attorney General's opinion was "irrelevant". 

Trustee Carlson remarked that it was a bit strong to 
say that the Attorney General's judgment was "irrelevant". 
Legalistic approaches to "sunshine" do not necessarily advance 
the welfare of the institution for which the Trustees are respon- 
sible. He agreed with Trustee Breyer that some sort of by-law 
was needed, and he said he believed strongly that the Trustees' 
responsibility was to look to the good of this institution for 
the long term. He said he not only believed in the need for suet 
modifications as Trustee Breyer suggested, but indicated the need 
for an expansion of the provision for the Trustees to discuss in 
executive session — not act on — policies the implementation of 
which would be frustrated by holding a discussion in open session. 
He said he could not understand how anybody could see something 
immoral or unethical in such discussions. He continued that he 
had been on the Board for two years before this subject was raised], 
and he could not recall an occasion when any Trustee present did 
not believe that an executive session was in the best interests 
of the University. He said he believed that the Attorney General 
ought to rule upon this question, and that in the meantime the 
Board should consider the possibility of modifying the state model 
along the lines suggested by Trustee Breyer. 

Trustee Breyer then sought to clarify his earlier re- 
marks. He said he would hate to see this discussion turn into a 
debate over whether or not the Trustees should obey the law. 
Either the law applies or it does not apply. If it does apply, 
he said, "of course we obey it"; if it does not, there is theoret- 
ically no restriction on the Board's discretion in this area. 
His presentation had been based on the possibility that the law 
does not apply to the Board of Trustees. If it does not, the by- 
law method is the logical one for filling this gap, and the ques- 
tion is which proposed by-law is most desirable. 



-3- 



Exec. Comm. 
10/6/76 



~rr 



5088 



Exec. Comm, 
10/6/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rowland said she was pleased to hear this clari- 
fication, because this is what she had assumed was at issue. 
Trustee Carlson agreed. Trustee Rowland then asked Counsel Searsoh 
to repeat the analysis of the problem which he had made at the 
last Executive Committee meeting. Counsel Searson said it was the 
statutory duty of the Attorney General to issue opinions to state 
agencies when there is doubt about the duties of that agency, and 
that, in this context, the request was made for such an opinion 
on the applicability of the open meeting law to the Board of Trus- 
tees. 

In his opinion, Chapter 75 of the General Laws gave a 
generous grant of autonomy to the University in 1962 when it pro- 
vided that, "notwithstanding any other provision of law to the 
contrary" the Board of Trustees may devise rules and regulations 
for the regulation of its own body. No prior opinion he had read 
or heard of had focused on the existence of Chapter 75 and its 
provisions, and he had therefore recommended that the President 
request an opinion of the Attorney General. If the Attorney Gen- 
eral rules that the University does have this autonomy, then it 
would be the Board's obligation under Chapter 75 to adopt a "rule 
or regulation" for the holding of executive sessions. 



Trustee Rowland thanked Mr. Searson and said she be- 
lieved that the Board should act affirmatively on the proposal 
today. She said that if the law is found to apply to the Univer- 
sity, there is no issue. But if it does not apply, the proposed 
by-law puts the Trustees in a better position to do their work. 

Trustee Cronin agreed with Trustee Burack, stating that 
the Board of Trustees has no right to decide whether it falls 
under the open meeting law or not — that is for the Attorney Gen- 
eral to decide. Second, if the Trustees don't believe that the 
law is appropriate to the University, they should seek a change 
in the statute. 

The idea, said the Chairman, was not to interpret the 
law but to take some interim action so that the Board could oper- 
ate while the Attorney General's opinion remained unissued. 

Secretary Parks asked why there was such a drive to do 
this, when the Attorney General's opinion was imminent, and asked 
why the Board should not wait for the ruling. Second, he would 
have trouble with limiting full public access unless openness 
would damage an individual. There were obviously different in- 
terpretations at the meeting, and that was a good reason to let 
the Attorney General decide. He questioned why the Board should 
risk adopting a by-law which might later prove to be in conflict 
with the Attorney General's ruling. The Chairman replied, that 
at the moment the Trustees have no provision of any kind for the 
holding of executive sessions. In Counsel Searson' s opinion, 
this was a deficiency in the Board's operating procedure which 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ought to be corrected, regardless of what the Attorney General 
may later decide. 

Secretary Parks suggested that the Trustees adopt a 
rule for executive sessions, instead of adopting a new by-law. 
Considerable discussion took place on this idea, and Trustee 
Shaler added that the motion might be amended to include a state- 
ment of good faith which set forth clearly the Trustees' intention 
to abide by the law, as soon as it is clarified by the Attorney 
General. At length it was agreed that a rule or regulation other 
than a by-law could be adopted to dispel the concerns expressed 
by Counsel until such time as the legal question was answered. 
The Executive Committee determined to recommend to the Board of 
Trustees that it adopt the following rule or regulation for the 
regulation of its own body and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; Executive Session . By vote of a majority of the 
Trustees present at any meeting, the Board may 
enter executive session, closed to the public. 

Executive sessions may be held only for the 
following purposes: 

(1) to discuss the reputation and character, 
physical condition and mental health as 
well as the professional competence of an 
individual; 

(2) to consider the discipline or dismissal of, 
or to hear complaints or charges brought 
against an individual; 

(3) to discuss strategy with respect to collec- 
tive bargaining or litigation if an open 
meeting may have a detrimental effect on 
the bargaining or litigating position of 
the university; 

(4) to discuss the deployment of security 
personnel or devices; 

(5) to consider allegations of criminal mis- 
conduct ; 

(6) to consider the purchase, exchange, lease 
or value of property or contracts if such 
discussions may have a detrimental effect 
on the negotiating position of the govern- 
mental body and a person, firm or corpora- 
tion; 

(7) to comply with the provisions of any 



-5- 



5089 



Exec. Comm. 
10/6/76 



~5GS0 



Exec. Comm, 
10/6/76 



MassPIRG 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

general or specific law or federal grant- 
in-aid requirements; 

(8) to consider the award of honorary degrees 
and other awards; 

(9) to consider the hiring or promotion of 
personnel; 

(10) to consider matters the disclosure of 

which might significantly frustrate the 
implementation of a proposed university 
action. 

The vote shall be taken by roll call and the 
purpose of the session shall be announced in advance 

The next item of agenda was a proposed amendment to 
Article IV, Section 2, of the Trustee By-laws. There being no 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that ARTICLE 

IV, SECTION 2, of the Trustee By-laws (Doc. T76-051) ! 
be rescinded in its entirety and that the following 
new section be inserted therefor: 

"SECTION 2. AMENDMENT, REVISION OR REPEAL OF 
BY-LAWS. These By-laws may be amended, revised or 
repealed by vote of a majority of the entire number 
of Trustees at any meeting of the Board of Trustees; 
provided, however, that the text of any amendment, 
revision or repeal as originally proposed shall be 
sent to the Trustees at least thirty days before the 
meeting. " 

The next matter on the agenda was a discussion of the 
University's relationship with the Massachusetts Public Interest 
Research Group . Chairman Healey explained that this item was on 
the agenda at the request of Trustee Spiller, and he recognized 
Trustee Spiller for his remarks. Trustee Spiller began by statin, 
that an opinion by Ropes & Gray had raised legal issues about the 



nature of the University's relationship with MassPIRG 
fore 



He there- 



MOVED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees suspend its 
support for MassPIRG pending a legal review of poten 
tial liability. 

Counsel Searson reviewed the points made by the Ropes 
& Gray memorandum and disputed the conclusion of illegality about 
the way in which the University is involved with MassPIRG. He 
said the fee was clearly voluntary, since 45 percent of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

students last year had declined to pay it. Further, he said that 
the University was reimbursed for the incidental costs of insert- 
ing the checkoff card in the students' bills. He concluded that 
the fee was not illegal or unconstitutional. Trustee Morgenthau 
said that, while the legal issue might be blurred, the education- 
al issue was not. Some of the best out-of-classroom work done by 
students in the state, she said, was done through MassPIRG. Chan 
cellor Bromery added that several years ago the University was 
urging students to come in off the streets and work within the 
system. Now, he said, the work they are doing within the system 
is being questioned. 

Trustee Carlson agreed that support should not be sus- 
pended because of the valid educational work done by PIRG, but 
said, first, that it appeared to him that PIRG has done less 
investigation and more advocacy in recent years; and second, that 
he would prefer a positive, rather than a negative, fee election 
system. Experience has shown, he said, that there is a psycholog 
ical pressure on an individual when faced by a negative election 
decision so that he will rarely vote negatively. Trustee Robert- 
son said he also believed in affirmative votes, not negative ones 

Trustee Shaler disagreed that students would be unlikely 
to elect not to support PIRG, because money is involved and peo- 
ple naturally wish to save a dollar wherever possible. He also 
disagreed with the thrust of the motion, which he said would put 
PIRG in the position of having to prove its innocence. If there 
is a doubt about the legality of the University's relationship 
with PIRG, a legal review ought to be conducted, and if the doubts 
prove to be real, then support could be suspended. But he did not 
believe that support should be suspended before the fact. 

Trustee Breyer said he was not convinced that the col- 
lection system ought to be changed, but in any case if it were 
changed at this meeting, the Trustees would be taking an action 
in response to an opinion by Ropes & Gray sent under a cover 
letter by the Massachusetts Taxpayer's Foundation. If this was 
an educational issue, which he believed it was, then it should be 
studied under the auspices of the proper University committees. 
He would object to a change by means of the present procedure. 

Chairman Healey said he had not enough information about 
PIRG to take any action today. He said he had a completely open 
mind on the subject, and he added in strong terms that no pressur^ 
whatever had been brought to bear upon the Board by the opponents 
of the so-called Bottle Bill to consider this matter. Trustee 
Spiller stressed that he had individually raised this issue be- 
cause the father of a student on the Amherst campus had brought 
the matter of the PIRG fee to him; it had nothing to do with the 
Bottle Bill. 

Trustee Gordon said that this discussion was related to 



-7- 



fro, 



&031 



Exec. Comm, 
10/6/76 



-G0S2 



Exec. Coram. 
10/6/76 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

other discussions which the Trustees have had on the question of 
student representation. He said he did not know how many students 
really wanted to support PIRG, and he was not sure that the Stu- 
dent Senate was really in a position to speak for the students. 
He believed that the Trustees ought to get more information on 
this question before it could take any action. 

Vice President Lynton suggested that the Amherst campus 
make a complete report to a Trustee Committee in the next month 
or two addressing all the questions which had been raised. Trus- 
tee Spiller said this would be agreeable to him. Trustee Cronin 
then added that PIRG itself was anxious to clear up any misunder- 
standings on the part of the Trustees about what the group does 
and how. In fact, he said, PIRG itself wishes to re-examine its 
relationship to the Amherst students. He also reported that a 
binding referendum was planned by the Student Government Associa- 
tion for November on several issues on the Amherst campus, and he 
said the PIRG question could easily be added to the referendum. 

Mr. Lynton' s suggestion was agreed to by the Committee, 
and Trustee Spiller withdrew his motion. 

Trustee Robertson alluded to statements that the Trus- 
tees were being pressured to consider severing the University's 
connection with PIRG, emphasizing that the only documents he had 
received on this subject were a memorandum from counsel Searson 
upholding the legality of the PIRG connection and a memorandum 
from President Wood. Nobody had pressured him as a Trustee to 
consider this or any other matter. Several other Trustees agreed 
strongly with this statement. 

At 12:45 p.m. the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was convened by Chairman Troy to meet jointly with the 
Executive Committee. With the two committees in joint session, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To enter executive session to consider two appoint- 
ments and to consider nominations for honorary 
degrees. 



UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Paul L. Puryear 
as Professor of 
Political Sci- 
ence with Tenure 
(Doc. T77-025A) 
and Vice Chan- 
cellor for Aca-j 
demic Affairs 
and Provost 
(Doc. T77-025) 



The executive session ended at 1:50 p.m. It was there- 
upon moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 

the appointment of Paul L. Puryear by the President 
as Professor of Political Science with tenure at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set 
forth in Doc. T77-025A. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur, 

along with the President, in the appointment by the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor of Dr. Paul L. Puryear as Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in Docu- 
ment T77-025. 



and further 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
personnel action as detailed in Document T77-034. 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur, 
along with the President, in the appointment by the 
Chancellor of Dr. Russel C. Jones as Dean of the 
School of Engineering at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst, as set forth in Document T77-026. 



and further 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
personnel action as set forth in Document T77-033. 

The Executive Committee then on motion made and secondec. 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm as 



recipients for Honorary Degrees to be awarded at the 
UM/Amherst 1977 Commencement those candidates ap- 
proved in Executive Session of the Executive Commit- 
tee on this date and instruct the Chancellor of the 
campus to proceed with necessary arrangements. 

There being no further business to come before the 
Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 1:55 p.m. 




toUjJL 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-9- 



;093 



1 



Exec. Comm. 
10/6/76 



Personnel 
Action 

UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Russel C. Jones 
as Dean of the 
School of En- 
gineering 
(Doc. T77-026) 

Personnel Ac- 
tion 



UM/Amherst— 
Honorary De- 
gree Awards 



o 



094 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 6, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 
Room Al-1 Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Troy; Trustees Breyer, 



Burack, Cronin, Morgenthau, Shaler; Mrs. Bluestone representing 
Trustee Fielding; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, Assistant to the 
Secretary, recording 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Winthrop 



Other Trustees : Chairman Healey; Trustees Abrams, Carlson, Clark 
Conti, Dennis, Eddy, Gordon, McNeil, Robertson, Rowland, Shearer, 
Spiller; Secretary Parks representing Trustee Dukakis 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 



Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 



sentative 



UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger 



At 12:45 p.m. the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy was convened by Chairman Troy to meet jointly with the 
Executive Committee. With the two committees in joint session, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To enter executive session to consider two appoint- 
ments and to consider nominations for honorary de- 
grees. 



The executive session ended at 1:50 p.m. 
upon moved, seconded and 



It was there- 



Executive 
Session 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 

the appointment of Paul L. Puryear by the President 
as Professor of Political Science with tenure at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth 
in Doc. T77-025A. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur, along 
with the President, in the appointment by the Chan- 
cellor of Dr. Paul L. Puryear as Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in Document 
T77-025. 



UM/Amherst — 
Concurrence in 
Appointment of 
Paul L. Puryear 
as Professor of 
Political Sci- 
ence with Tenure 
and Vice Chan- 
cellor for Aca- 
demic Affairs 
(Doc. T77-025, 
T77-025A) 






JJ 



F & EP 
10/6/76 



Personnel 

Action 

(Doc. T77-033) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and further 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
personnel action as set forth in Document T77-033. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 1:55 p.m. 





Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 6, 1976; 1:00 p.m. 
Room Al-1, Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; Trustees Abrams 
Burack, Clark, Dennis, Eddy, Shearer; Secretary Hardy; Miss Eiche^., 
recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustee Winthrop 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 

UM/Boston : Mr. Gilmore, Director of Community Services 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Greig, Director of Physical Plant 



~S0S7 



Chairman Spiller called the meeting to order at 1:55 
p.m. He introduced the first item of agenda, the Department of 
Public Works Busway, Draft Agreements (Docs. T77-030 and T77-031) 
He recalled that at the last meeting of the Committee some reser- 
vations had been expressed about community acceptance of the bus- 
way and that Mr. Gilmore, Director of Community Services, had 
been asked to meet with members of the community to discuss their 
concerns. Chairman Spiller reminded the Committee of Vice Presi- 
dent Robinson's memorandum which had informed them that represen- 
tatives of the MBTA and the Office of the Mayor had met with 
members of the Columbia Point Development Council and Mr. Gilmore 
He then asked Mr. Gilmore to report on the results of these meet- 
ings. Mr. Gilmore replied that all outstanding problems had been 
resolved. There being no further opposition, upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it author- 
ize the Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston to execute agreements with the Massachu- 
setts Department of Public Works and the Massachu- 
setts Bay Transportation Authority for the construc- 
tion of a roadway at the Harbor Campus and for the 
provision of bus service along said roadway; further, 
that said agreements be in accordance with the Draft 
Agreements set forth in Trustee Documents T77-030 
and T77-031 or as the same may be amended through 
negotiation. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Mrs. Robinson, Vice 
President for Planning, reported on the status of several pending 
community and University projects. She said the John F. Kennedy 



UM/Boston — 
DPW Busway, 
Draft Agree - 
ments 

(Docs. T77-030 
and T77-031) 



John F. Kennedy 
Library 



5098 



B & G 
10/6/76 



Capital 
Outlay 



UM/Boston- 
Gymnasium 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Library deed was being reviewed by the Federal government and 
that the University and the Library Corporation are currently 
working out certain administrative agreements regarding the use 
of University roadways, chilled water, and similar matters. 

Mrs. Robinson said that a capital outlay bill is now 
before the Legislature. This bill includes all the urgent items 
submitted by the University last year. 

In response to a query regarding the status of the 
Physical Education Building at UM/Boston, Mrs. Robinson replied 
that bid documents were ready to go out. She said she had writ- 
ten to the Director of the Bureau of Building Construction re- 
questing a report on the status of the project. Construction 
funds have been appropriated by the Legislature since 1974, and 
the project received executive office approvals at that time. 
Any delay now in the release of funds, she said, would cause a 
corresponding delay in construction and pose a serious threat to 
the budget for the project due to cost escalation. The project 
synopsis was submitted by Administration and Finance to the 
Executive Office of Educational Affairs in August, 1975, for 
comment and has apparently received no response from that office 
in the ensuing months. Secretary Hardy had written to the Secre- 
tary of Educational Affairs in February, 1976, calling his atten- 
tion to this matter. Trustee Burack urged that clarification be 
obtained as to the necessity of obtaining approval of the Execu- 
tive Office of Educational Affairs. Secretary Parks, who entered 
the meeting area, was asked by Chairman Spiller if his office was 
holding up the gym. Secretary Parks replied that he believed it 
was "in Administration and Finance." 

Mrs. Robinson continued discussion of capital outlay 
items, saying that included in the $8.2 million requested was 
money for utility work at UM/Amherst, heating and ventilation 
work at UM/Boston, and equipment for two floors of the teaching 
hospital as well as site work at UM/Worcester . A new capital 
outlay cycle was about to begin, she said, and the University 
had been invited to submit its request. Among items which would 
be requested, she said, were money for corrections to the sea- 
water cooling system at UM/Boston and the "recapturing" of under- 
used space for educational purposes. Trustee Burack asked if 
authorization had been received for additional students, to which 
Mrs. Robinson replied that enrollment guidelines and targets had 
been established by the Board of Trustees and that further review 
was part of the operating budget review. 

Since the pending Board meeting made it impossible to 
discuss other items, it was the sense of the Committee that 
Chairman Spiller and Mrs. Robinson would meet to review the pri- 
orities and specifics of the new capital outlay request. 

Chairman Spiller informed the Committee that the next 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

meeting would be held at UM/Amherst on November 3, at which time 
he hoped to arrange an inspection tour of those buildings which 
were ready for acceptance by the Board of Trustees. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed at 2:15 p.m. 




UulXjUL^ 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



B & G 
10/6/76 



-3- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

October 19, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 
Room SF1-4 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Robertson, Trustee McNei 
and Mrs. Blues tone representing Trustee Fielding; Secretary Hardy 
Mr. Mehegan, Assistant to the Secretary, recording 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Abrams , Croce and Okin 

Office of the President : Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. O'Leary, Associate Counsel; Ms. Veith, Senior Asso- 
ciate for Academic Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Mr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Mr. Fellner, Assistant Controller; Mr. Ference, Grou|) 
Practice Administrator; Professor Goodman, Chairman of Department 
of Physiology; Mr. Greene, Assistant to Associate Dean for Academ- 
ic Affairs; Professor Smith, Faculty Representative 

The meeting was called to order at 12:40 p.m. The firs: UM/Worcester- 
item on the agenda was a report from the Chancellor, and Chancellor Chancellor's 
Bulger began by reporting on progress in filling two positions: Report 
Affirmative Action Officer and Chairman of the Department of Psy- 
chiatry. As for the first, there were three final candidates be- 
ing recommended by the Search Committee, and Dr. Bulger hoped to 
make a decision within a week after he had met with each candi- 
date. As for the second position, the search was now narrowed to 
four or five final candidates, and again he said he hoped to have 
a name to report soon. 

The second matter which Chancellor Bulger brought to the 
attention of the Committee was the Child Development Center, whiclji 
had opened in August. This program was operated in concert with 
the Department of Public Health, and was directed toward early i- 
dentif ication of high-risk developmental cases. The program deal| 
not only with children, however, but with the training of staff 
who work with children. Mrs. Bluestone said the Department of 
Public Health was enormously pleased at the establishment of this 
program, and said it was a good example of what two state agencie^ 
can accomplish, working together. She added that the Department 
had long wanted to establish a program of this sort in the centra!, 
part of the state. 

Chairman Robertson referred to the Chancellor's state- 
ment about the affirmative action officer, and asked whether the 
lack of appointment of an officer was the reason for the delay in 
the report on affirmative action which had been requested. Chan- 
cellor Bulger explained that part of the reason for the delay was 



- 5102 



Health Affairs 
10/19/76 



UM/Worcester— 
Governance of 
the Medical 
School (Doc. 
T77-028A) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that it would be necessary for the new affirmative action officer 
to be involved in some of the statistical detail required to be 
gathered for such a report. Dr. Greene added that some of the 
necessary information required a personnel summary run on the 
computer at Amherst, which had not been made since October 1975. 
That would be done soon in order to provide a utilization analy- 
sis, which is basic to any affirmative action plan. 

The next item on the agenda was Governance of the Medi- 
cal School (Doc. T77-028). Chancellor Bulger recalled that the 
Committee had suggested a number of changes in the document at the 
last meeting, and Professor Goodman had worked closely with Vice 
President Lynton to make the final adjustments. These changes, 
he said, which were outlined in the President's memorandum to the 
Committee, have been made. Mr. Eller added that the only issue 
discussed at the previous meeting not dealt with in this proposed 
final document is the matter of the reverse time-clock process 
for the handling of governance issues. This item is. being post- 
poned for consideration later. 

There followed brief discussion of the document, prima- 
rily clarifying procedural matters contained in the document. 
Mrs. Bluestone asked about the size of the faculty because a quo- 
rum for a regularly scheduled meeting of the faculty shall consist: 
of 100 members. Chancellor Bulger responded that the full-time 
faculty numbered 121, but the total faculty is approximately 300, 
and these meetings would include all faculty. Chairman Robertson 
asked about the membership of the Financial Aid Committee, re- 
calling that the previous committee discussion had indicated that 
the committee should be composed of faculty, which is not speci- 
fied in the present document. Professor Goodman responded that 
the Committee on Committees had the authority to appoint the mem- 
bers of the Financial Aid Committee and they would probably ap- 
point only faculty to such a committee. However, circumstances 
could change and, he said, it was felt that leaving it open al- 
lowed the freedom to appoint representatives appropriate to the 
Committee. Finding this explanation acceptable, Chairman Robert- 
son then suggested an editorial change for purposes of clarity: 
the addition of the phrase "Duties shall include:" following the 
words "clinical departments" on page eight. Upon a motion made 
and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Executive Committee that it 
recommend that the Board of Trustees approve and 
adopt the Governance Document for the University 
of Massachusetts Medical School as set forth in 
Trustee Document T77-028A. 

UM/Worcester- The final item was a Briefing on the UM/Worcester Group 

Briefing on ! Practice (Doc. T75-144A) . Chairman Robertson first recognized 



I 



Group Practice Chancellor Bulger. Chancellor Bulger said this was the first in 
(Doc. T75-1AAA) a series of meetings which would serve to familiarize the Commit- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tee with the Rules and Regulations for the operation and govern- 
ance of the Medical School Group Practice (Doc. T75-144A) . As 
stipulated in Doc. T75-144A, those Rules and Regulations are to be 
reviewed and evaluated by the Trustees within two years of its a- 
doption in June, 1975. 

He first gave some historical background. Before the 
sixties, clinical faculty in medical schools, the majority of whom 
were part-time faculty, expected to keep, and did keep, all of the 
income generated from clinical practice in addition to their sala- 
ries. In the early sixties, however, group practice plans began 
to be developed whereby funds generated from clinical practice 
would be put into a "common pot" and not necessarily disbursed to 
the earner on a dollar-f or-dollar basis, nor even to the earner's 
department, but would be used to pay the salaries of the clinical 
faculty under a prearranged compensation structure with any over- 
age being used for institutional purposes. The critical differ- 
ence, Chancellor Bulger said, between the University's plan and 
those of other schools was that in most other schools the physi- 
cians in the group practice are privately incorporated, and that 
money is theirs, even if part of it goes back to the dean for him 
to use as he sees fit. But at this school, the money from fees is 
placed into a trust fund controlled by the University like any oth 
er trust fund, and funds from other sources can be added to it, 
which allows greater flexibility in the allocation of funds to 
various institutional purposes after the doctors have been paid. 

Chancellor Bulger went on to say that with federal sup- 
port for medical education leveling off, more and more of the in- 
come from clinical practice was paying for the cost of medical ed- 
ucation. The use of funds from the "common pot" generated by groub 
practice, once the doctors had been paid, varied greatly among 
schools, but, he said, the University of Massachusetts at Worcester 
las the opportunity to structure the plan in such a way as to a- 
void or redress imbalance between high and relatively low-earning 
specialties in terms of funding equipment or departmental person- 
nel needs . 

He pointed out the need for the plan to encourage indi- 
vidual clinician incentive, while at the same time achieving insti 
tutional goals in the allocation of funds. Chancellor Bulger said 
that at one University he had been affiliated with, none of the 
overage in Group Practice income was returned directly to the earn 
ing departments, but all the money left in the pot after the doc- 
tors had been paid went to the fund controlled by the Dean. There 
fore, the high-earning specialists were left with little incentive 
to do more than was necessary to earn more than they would get 
Dack for their departments. He would advocate some amount of fund 
generated by high-earning specialties going back to those depart- 
ments, say to anesthesiology, for them to fill positions or buy 
equipment, etc. In doing that, individual incentive would be en- 
couraged while other funds in the group practice could be used to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

support the less high-earning departments, such as family practice 
obstetrics or pediatrics; or to support other departments or ac- 
tivities consistent with the goals and missions of the Medical Cen- 
ter. 



Professor Smith said she understood the concept of the 
Group Practice to be a mechanism for paying more salaries to com- 
pete with the private sector for high-quality clinical faculty. 
She said, however, she had difficulty with the idea of someone whq 
is paid to teach also drawing money from patient care. She lik- 
ened it to herself, as a basic science faculty member, drawing her| 
salary and also collecting from the students. What plan could pro 1 
vide incentive, she asked, for a basic science faculty member. 
She said she understood why the group practice plan was necessary, 
but expressed a philosophical resistance to the concept. Both 
she and Trustee McNeil suggested that this was not an equitable 
system. Chancellor Bulger said there was no doubt that this was 
a source of some irritation among some faculty, but suggested 
that the earning capacity of clinical faculty was a reality of the 
market place and to that extent not under the University's control). 
Ideally, he added, every clinical encounter is a teaching mode for 
the faculty and an educational experience for the students and 
this is the way it usually happens. He observed also that the in 
come generated in this fashion, potentially millions of dollars 
for the "common pot", gives the school flexibility to structure 
itself in ways consistent with its long-range plans and overall 
mission. He added that the overage could be used for non-person- 

| nel expenses in the basic science departments, or in other ways 
which would help to maintain the academic balance the school wants 

I in terms of its mission. 



There was further extensive discussion. Trustee McNeil 
observed that what happened to the Group Practice would have a 
critical effect on the quality of service to patients and the 
quality of education for students and that it was not just an is- 
sue of faculty compensation. Chairman Robertson asked that Doc- 
tors Dalen and Wheeler be present to offer their insights at the 
next meeting. He also invited input from any other interested 
and involved parties. He continued that this had been a useful 
discussion, and he said the Committee would have to return to 
this subject many times between now and May. There was no other 
business to come before the Committee and the meeting was ad- 
journed at 2:20 p.m. 




Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustee 



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ATTENDANCE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

October 25, 1976; 3:30 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shaler; President Wood; 
Trustees Conti, Cronin; Ms. Kaplan representing Trustee Okin; 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Anrig, Eddy, Gordon, McNeil 
and Morgenthau 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for 



Student Affairs; Ms. Furman, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Mr. James, Assistant Chancellor; Mr. Vannicelli, 
Associate Provost; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Fineblatt, Associate Dean and Director of Stu- 






dent Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 3:40 p.m. The first 
order of business was Student Support Services at UM/Boston. 
President Wood spoke first, noting the history of the Trustees' 
concern with the problems of student support services at UM/Bostoij 
when Trustee Rowland was chairman of the committee and former 
Trustee Snowden's particular concerns for relationship and service 
of the University to the Boston community. He also referred to 
the particular problems of such services at urban universities 
and the particular issue of whether or not in the urban setting 
the character and style or special quality of services should be 
different from traditional approaches to student affairs. He re- 
called that there had been a series of joint meetings of the Com- 
mittees on Student Affairs and Faculty and Educational Policy to 
assess the special circumstances of the urban campus. The report 
of the President's working group on University Counseling, Advis- 
ing, and Support Services chaired by then Vice Chancellor Gage, 
he said, had cited special opportunities for service to commuter 
students of the urban university. The approach and directions 
for student services had been discussed then and he stated that 
the issues now at UM/Boston were those of organization, adequacy 
of service and specializations, and of what character and at what 
level these should be. 

Mr. Lynton stressed that the issues have to be addressee 



UM/Boston — 
Student Sup- 
port Services 



. 



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Stu. Affairs 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on a philosophical level and then described the nature of UM/ 
Boston students in some detail — first generation college students, 
having a poor high school background and little if any notion of 
the use of a college education — which are indicators of the need 
for remedial education and special counseling. He feels that 
there is now a consensus on campus as to what the needs are and 
what is to be done. 

Chairman Shaler noted that the merger of Colleges I and 
II presented another set of problems for Student Support Services 
at UM/Boston. He then asked Chancellor Golino to comment on the 
document at hand and asked who produced it and for whom it was 
intended. 

Chancellor Golino replied that the report had been writ- 
ten in his office by Mr. James and had been circulated and cri- 
tiqued by many members of the UM/Boston community. He had asked 
for the report because he felt it was time to ask a number of 
questions - what are the fundamental issues and problems? what 
has been done that has produced beneficial results? which are the 
non-functioning areas and what should be done to achieve desirable 
results? The document is seen as a preliminary report which, in 
a month or so, should lead to a final proposal. 

He pointed out that three units have worked on the Stu- 
dent Support Services problem: a subcommittee of the Unification 
Committee, working from the College of Liberal Arts point of view; 
Mr. Tubbs issued a report addressing the issue from his point of 
view as Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; and the report Mr. 
James had written, listing problems and questions as seen by the 
Boston campus in general. Chancellor Golino said his next step 
would be to ask all three groups to come together to work towards 
implementation after arriving at a consensus on answers to the 
problems noted in the report. Answers such as what structure, 
what personnel and what resources are needed to do the job. He 
said he had made some commitment of resources for student support 
services, but before going further with the allocation of all the 
resources budgeted for this area, he wanted to take a global pic- 
ture of academic and non-academic services to students, and not 
deal with the problems piecemeal. Chancellor Golino also noted 
that Student Support Services at UM/Boston, with all its problems 
was an ongoing operation which, viewed in the light of two years' 
financial stringency, was functioning respectably. 



I 



Chairman Shaler then opened the meeting to general dis- 



cussion, 



Trustee Conti asked why the report of the subcommittee 
of the Unification Committee, which she considered a good report, 
had not been distributed. Chancellor Golino replied that the 
Unification Subcommittee report on student services made specific 
recommendations which will be considered along with those of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

other reports. However, he stressed that he felt it was too early 
to make specific recommendations. It is time to ask questions anc 
when the right questions have been asked, then recommendations 
(from any source) can be made. He wanted the record to show that 
some recommendations of the Unification Subcommittee had already 
been implemented because it seemed desirable to do so. Chairman 
Shaler asked for examples. 

Mr. Vannicelli cited recommendations regarding an in- 
crease in the level of staffing in basic skills instruction, the 
kind of instruction that takes place outside of normal credit 
carrying courses. Another of the recommendations was to retain 
some basic skills part-time staff and to increase the time allot- 
ment of others. Another was to increase the amount of instruction 
in quantitative skills. These recommendations have been imple- 
mented. 

Mr. James stressed the need for a comprehensive review 
and an accepted campus policy before releasing reports containing 
specific proposals. He mentioned that he had met with appropriate 
deans to see if any of the subcommittee's recommendations could be 
implemented now. 

Chairman Shaler said that Trustee Conti had given him a 
copy of the subcommittee's report and that he found it to be a 
good report. He was particularly impressed with the report's 
sense of commitment and because it offered avenues of approach 
to solving problems other than additional funding. 

Trustee Conti observed that the number of academic ad- 
visors for the first few months of the current semester was below 
what it was last year and only now is the staffing up to the level 
it was, when in fact, unification was supposed to lead to an im- 
provement. The report for today's meeting, she continued, refers 
to positions which have been committed to the counseling center. 
She asked how many positions there were. 

Mr. Vannicelli asked to respond to the question. He 
apologized for airing internal problems at a Trustee meeting; 
however, because there have been manipulations of information on 
campus distorting the facts, the matter can no longer be ignored. 
As has been public knowledge since September 1, he said, the known 
facts are: tutorial funds for the College of Liberal Arts are up 
22 percent, from $45,000 to $58,000; and the instructional staff 
increased from 4.5 FTE positions to 5 FTE; in the College of Pub- 
lic and Community Services, tutorial funds were increased seven 
percent from last year. In the College of Professional Studies, 
the tutorial fund has been increased by five percent and the basic 
instructional skills staff has been increased by 1/3 FTE; and the 
college has a new program in which the average faculty member 
spends eight hours per month teaching basic skills in addition to 
his regular teaching. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Conti asked for a definition of "committed" 
positions. Chancellor Golino replied that seven positions have 
been set aside and there will be three more in counseling. Until 
it has been determined what kind of counseling skills are needed, 
psychological or academic, the positions will not be released. 

Chairman Shaler recalled that at the Trustee discussion 
last spring on the merger of Colleges I and II, the concerns of 
the Trustees about the adequacy of student services weiE directed 
at the total campus. Some felt unification was going to result 
in chaos; others said that things would be just as good, perhaps 
better. Now, continued Chairman Shaler, we find we have ten posi- 
tions committed in theory, yet they haven't been filled. The 
Trustees were assured that though the unification was occurring 
late in the year, there would be adequate time for student services 
to be organized. Now we hear, "No, we don't know the direction 
in which we're going". 

Chancellor Golino stated firmly that unification had no 
bearing on the problems of the Student Support Services. The prob- 
lems were there when the campus had one college, then two college^, 
then three colleges. Until an agreed-upon plan and structure are 
available with which UM/Boston's commitment can be implemented, 
it would be unwise to hire people. 



Chairman Shaler agreed with Chancellor Golino 's conclu- 
sion but not with his premise. He believed that over the last 
five-year period, direction should have been determined. Chair- 
man Shaler then referred to the Gage Report, a report which had 
the 100 percent backing of the Board of Trustees as a mandate for 
action. He noted that one finds things of importance in the Gage 
Report that are not in the report at hand. The latter report pro-e- 
poses a very traditional group of support services for a campus 
that is not traditional. The Amherst campus, traditional in the 
sense of being residential, has an approach to student problems 
that is much less traditional. He added further that the report 
at hand lacks a sense of balance or correlation between affirma- 
tive action and student support services and that the report does 
not deal with the issue of student identification, nor does it 
suggest an outreach approach. 

Chancellor Golino expressed mystification that this re- 
port would lead one to believe that it was describing a tradition- 
al campus at UM/Boston. He noted the close connection between 
affirmative action and recruitment policies. Chairman Shaler 
stated that his remarks were based on the report and the lack 
therein of any nontraditional proposals. Mr. Vannicelli pointed 
out that the report was dealing with fundamental issues and focus- 
ed on orientation to the problem and not on delivery of services. 
If it had intended to do the latter, it would have spelled out the 
services now offered to the students. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood expressed interest in knowing what hap- 
pens when a student in need of skills counseling arrives on cam- 
pus and in the mechanics of psychiatric referrals. Mr. Vannicellt 
described current practices. In the College of Public and Commu 
nity Services, each incoming student is assessed individually. 
In the College of Liberal Arts each student is given four diagnos- 
tic tests, one dealing with basics, a self-assessment test deal- 
ing with study habits and special tests in mathematics and lan- 
guage skills. Students are assessed and assigned to courses ap- 
propriate to their skills. The tests are partly self-scoring and 
after taking them there is a good sense, he said, of where each 
freshman stands and tutors are provided where there is a need. 
Psychiatric referrals are made by the Health Services staff. 

Chairman Shaler asked for elaboration of UM/Boston's 
efforts in the area of community action and outreach as described 
in Mr. Tubbs' report. Mr. Tubbs responded that what is being don£ 
in the areas of community action and outreach is basically divided 
into two areas. The pre-freshmen program and the veterans pro- 
gram, together with the college preparatory program, are in one 
area. The pre-freshmen program is for students in secondary 
schools and provides instruction in the high school, and the vet- 
erans and pre-college program participants come to the campus and 
are given twelve hours of instruction in work designed to qualify 
them for Graduate Equivalency Diploma certification. In the sec- 
ond area, the Student Activities Committee, involving about 60 
students, is working closely with the Boston schools. Also, some 
effort is put into tutoring and counseling for Columbia Point res- 
idents. In response to Chairman Shaler 's questions, Mr. Tubbs 
noted that undergraduates in the Student Activities Committee 
were 100 percent involved in the programs described. 

Chancellor Golino pointed out that this year's program 
for veterans was not funded by HEW. Fifty applicants wanted to 
be in the program and had prepared themselves for admission. In 
late August, hearing for the first time that HEW support was not 
forthcoming, UM/Boston funded the program out of its own resources 
which he believed demonstrated the campus's commitment to outreaclfi. 

Chancellor Golino also said he agreed that the unifica- 
tion report and Mr. Tubbs' report should be widely distributed 
and discussed, but many basic questions remained to be answered 
before making specific recommendations. Chairman Shaler acknowl- 
edged the merit of the Chancellor's point; however, he noted that 
it sometimes gives the Trustees a better overview of the whole 
situation if they are aware of some of the preliminary delibera- 
tions. Mr. Lynton noted that it might be useful for the committed 
to learn of the process and the timetable between now and the 
moment when the recommendations are to be made to the Trustees. 
For example, is the Ad Hoc Committee part of the governance pro- 
cess? Is there going to be a governance review? etc. 



Stu. Affairs 
10/25/76 



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"5 



Stu. Affairs 
10/25/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. James responded that the Ad Hoc Committee has stud- 
ied earlier reports, including the New Directions Report and re- 
ports from the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and the direc- 
tors of the major units within Student Affairs outlining the his- 
tory, resources and philosophy of each unit and giving some indi- 
cation of the direction the unit will take over the next few years; 
The committee has met with the Vice Chancellor and with the direc- 
tors of the major Student Affairs units and is now meeting with 
the deans of the colleges. When these meetings are over, he said 
they will put together a report . It has been agreed that the re- 
port will be forwarded to the Assembly for comment and review, 
recognizing the very tight deadline of getting the report to the 
Trustees' Committee within a month. Mr. James said that the Ad 
Hoc Committee's synthesis of the recommendations from all areas 
of the campus, though an administrative effort, will be referred 
to governance for the Assembly's comment. President Wood noted 
that the provision for student support services was an administra- 
tive matter and that the Chancellor had the discretion for strat- 
egies of implementation to be used. 

Chairman Shaler said that the existing Trustee endorse- 
ment of the Gage report is ignored in the latest report. He felt 
that it was time for somebody to say, "Here is the Gage Report, 
revisited 1976. Here is what will work and we are going to do 
thus and so. Here is what we feel is no longer meaningful". The 
guidelines were established about six years ago and they are not 
being followed. Among the premises of the Gage Report, he said, 
was one that held that in the history of social change there have 
been attempts to better various minorities and there is an assump u 
tion that when the minority is bettered the whole group is better- 
ed. That was a commitment the Trustees took very seriously, a 
commitment that was reaffirmed last January. The Chairman of the 
Board announced at a full board meeting that this was a top prior- 
ity item of the Board. We have put down certain guidelines; if 
they are unworkable, the Board should be so informed. He stressed 
that the forthcoming report should contain a sense of the estab- 
lished guidelines, should show signs of specific implementation 
and some idea of when things are going to move. 



Ms. Kaplan wanted to know how soon implementation would 
follow the appearance of the report to be issued at the end of 
November. She referred to the earlier comments about unused re- 
sources that are available. She said she believed it was time to 
think about the serious unmet needs and to consider intermediate 
steps. While not advocating a "bandaid" approach, intermediate 
steps, she said, do fill some needs. Chancellor Golino responded 
that the ten positions had been assembled by taking resources 
from other areas and are a further expression of UM/Boston's com- 
mitment to student services. The one error that he had seen re- 
peated time after time and did not want to see again was that of 
putting a few resources here and a few there without having a com 
prehensive plan. As to a specific date, discussion will have 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been completed by the end of November and conclusions reached on 
some of the issues. 



President Wood suggested that, if it would be helpful, 
the Secretary could be asked to provide a summary of the principal 
actions and votes of the Trustees from the Gage Report forward, 
in order to have a view of what the status of the Trustees' con- 
cern has been. He also noted the hazards of the "bandaid" approach, 
however, he stated, it occasionally stops infections. 



Chairman Shaler noted that last month's Board meeting 
had approved the Fiscal '78 budget request. The budget for the 
Amherst campus requested an increase of 55 percent for student 
support services, the Boston budget asked for a 15 percent in- 
crease. Acknowledging that the figures could be adjusted, he 
pointed out that, considering inflation and an area which all a- 
greed needed improvement, a 15 percent increase could not be seen 
as going too far out on the limb. Mr. Lynton reminded the Commit-- 
tee of Vice President Janis ' comments about the difference between 
a request budget and an operating budget. All three campuses and 
the President's office are aware that a great deal more work needs 
to go into the specifications and details of next year's operating 
budget. Chancellor Golino felt that the figures cited were some- 
what misleading since the services of greatest concern, the aca- 
demic support services, appear in the budget under academic serv- 
ices, not under student services. 

Chairman Shaler, accepting these observations, gave his 
understanding of what was to transpire. A final report will be 
made sometime next month. Hopefully, the report will reflect the 
Trustee guidelines of the past, and will show the positive result 
of implementation rather than recommendations of what could be 
done if more money was available. December 1 will be considered 
a target date, and by that date, he hoped substantial implementa- 
tion will have commenced. 



Chairman Shaler introduced the next item on the agenda MassPIRG 
and asked Mr. Lynton to begin the discussion. Mr. Lynton recallec. 
that in the last meeting of the Executive Committee of the Board, 
Trustee Spiller introduced the subject of MassPIRG and the question 
of the University's relationship to it. As a result of this dis- 
cussion, the Board directed that a full review of this relationship 
be made in a report at a mid-November committee meeting by the 
Amherst and Boston campuses and the President's Office. The re- 
port will give an overview of the current and past activities of 
MassPIRG, including the activities of WMPIRG, the predecessor of 
MassPIRG. As much information as can be gathered on those Mass- 
PIRG projects which involved UMass students will be included. A 
number of things have been discussed at length, such as the various 
funding mechanisms for MassPIRG, information as to national pat- 
terns and activities, the kinds of institutions participating, 
and an elaboration of various legal issues. It is also hoped, he 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

said, the report will lead to clarification of the question raisec 
by Trustee Robertson as to what the criteria should be by which 
an organization should or should not be included on the University's 
billing system. A meeting with Acting Vice Chancellor Woodbury 
to set things in motion in Amherst and a meeting with the Executive 
Director of MassPIRG have been held. Next week there will be a 
meeting with the Directors of Student Affairs from all three cam- 
puses, after which the outlines of the report should emerge. Pres- 
ident Wood noted his commitment to the Chairman of the Board to 
have a report for the December Board meeting, expressing campus 
positions and views prior to the time necessary to institute any 
changes in billings next semester, if called for. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 



r 




%JbJ& 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



f 



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ATTENDANCE : 



I 



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Trustees Burack, Clark, Dennis, Eddy, Shearer, Winthrop ; Secretary 
Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recording 

Absent Committee Members: Trustee Abrams 



ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner; Mr. Prussing, Deputy 
Budget Director 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Director of Planning; Mr. Meade, 



Associate Director of Planning; Mr. Ryan, Superintendent, Physical 
Plant; Mr. Simpson, Staff Associate, Planning Office 

UM/Boston : Mr. Gilmore, Director of Community Services; Mr. Meehan, 
Planning Director; Mr. Spaulding, Director, Physical Plant 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Greig, Director of Physical Plant; Mr. Turek, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 3, 1976; 9:30 a.m. 

Board Room, Whitmore Building 

University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 



5113 



Office of the President: Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 



Budget Analyst 

The meeting was called to order at 9:40 a.m. by Chairman 
Spiller. At the request of the Chairman, President Wood opened 
discussion of the Capital Outlay Review . He said that two weeks 
ago the first capital outlay appropriation in three years had been 
received. For the first time in a number of years, he said, it 
appears that the Commission on Administration and Finance is on a 
regular cycle for capital outlay, for which, he said, it should be 
commended. 

President Wood then listed the amounts received for vari 
ous projects in the FY 1977 appropriation passed by the General 
Court, as follows: 



Capital 

Outlay 

Review 



UM/Amherst 



Building renovations (Goodell) 
Utility renovations 
Campus safety improvements 



$2,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,020,000 



UM/Boston 



Modifications to seawater cooling 

system 
Study and design of the seawater 

cooling system 
Modifications to ventilating system 

of Building 010 



$ 225,000 
200,000 
300,000 



FY 1977 
Appropriations 



o 



B&G Comm. 
11/3/76 



114 



FY 1978 
Request 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UM/Worcester 



Equipment and furnishings for the 

University Hospital 
Site work 



Field Stations 



Waltham - boiler replacement 
Total Capital Outlay Appropriation 



$2,000,000 
1,100,000 



$ 110,000 
$8,455,000 



In addition, he said, planning money was appropriated 
for the State Archives at Columbia Point. The informal group of 
which Chairman Spiller is a member met last Friday, he said, and 
Mr. Ephron Catlin, former Executive Vice President of the First 
National Bank, had agreed to chair this group of concerned busi- 
nessmen who are discussing future development of the area. 

The University was asked to submit its preliminary FY 
1978 capital outlay request, which had been done in order to comply 
with state schedules. He said the University is establishing the 
same kind of hearing procedures for the campus requests for capital 
outlay that is has developed for the maintenance budget. President 
Wood said he would like to see developed a "shelf" of capital out- 
lay projects which have been considered by the Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds and which would be available at such times as the 
Executive Department and the General Court ask for capital outlay 
submissions. He would also like to see, he said, a closely exam- 
ined and interfiled system of capital needs for each campus so 
that the priorities among campuses will have been considered by 
the Committee and approved. Such a system of review and coordina- 
tion was used during the period of rapid growth of the University, 
he said. 

He added that the University is now in the decade after 
the "great leap forward" in building construction. It is faced, 
he said, with two problems: first, the buildings which were built 
during a time when growth was expected are now facing shake-down 
problems, particularly in the case of the large facilities; the 
Tillson Power Plant is an example; and second, buildings built 
during the time of expansion, committed to certain academic programs 
fifteen years ago, must now undergo changes and adaptation to meet 
the needs of the current academic programs; an example is Goodell. 
The priorities in the academic programs have shifted during the 
past decade, while the physical facilities are in place, he added. 
The third issue is what can be done prudently in renovating the 
buildings to fit new academic emphasis in order to receive the 
greatest benefit from the investments already made. He said he 
hoped at this meeting the Trustees would receive enough orientation 
to be able to do an intensive review at a later meeting. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Robinson said that the University is anxious now 
that the FY 1977 Capital Outlay money is available that it be put 
to work as expeditiously as possible. Many of these projects 
require immediate attention, she said, such as the ventilating 
system in Building 010. Chairman Spiller asked if any of the FY 
1977 items were duplicated in the FY 1978 request. Mrs. Robinson 
replied that they were not. She added that the UM/Amherst items 
are a good illustration of the types of capital outlay requests 
which will occur in a steady state - continuing repairs to roads, 
utilities and buildings of varying ages. Chairman Spiller asked 
if money for the Tillson Power Plant was included in the FY 1978 
appropriation. Mr. Littlefield said he anticipated that the FY 

1977 appropriation of $1.5 million would be required to correct 
the problem of the Tillson Power Plant. The FY 1978 request, he 
said, was for other renovations which could not be done because 
of the problem of the Tillson Plant. Chairman Spiller asked if 
any roadblocks were anticipated now that the money had been appro- 
priated. Mr. Littlefield said that although the money had been 
appropriated, there was always the possibility that it would not 
be released. He said that in some instances operating money had 
had to be used for utility repairs because the Bureau of Building 
Construction would not release the existing capital outlay balance 
because the Tillson problem had not been resolved. 

Trustee Burack asked why there was no money in the capi- 
tal outlay request for the purpose of buying library books. Mrs. 
Robinson explained that although in the past library books had 
been requested in both the operating and the capital outlay budgets 
this year it had been decided to include this item only in the 
maintenance budget request. Trustee Burack noted that all the 

terns were marked "urgent", but that the priorities were different 
and questioned the advisability of calling everything urgent. Mrs 
Robinson replied that the state had asked for a five-year capital 
budget request, but that only the top priorities of each campus 
were included in this initial list. The time limit for the FY 

1978 submission is short, she said, since the Legislature wishes 
to consider capital outlay in the general state budget, and it is 
important to evaluate which items are most immediate and urgent. 
She said she was informed at the hearings by the Executive Office 
of Administration and Finance that, if the University did not sub- 
mit a list, it would be assumed that the University had no capital 
outlay requirements. She said the University considers as urgent 
those items required within a year to eighteen months; as essentia,!, 
those items necessary within a three-year period; and as long-range, 
items required in the next four to five years. The scheduled cam-) 
pus hearings are being held to determine priorities among the es- 
sential and long-range items. The final proposal will be presented 
to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds at its next meeting. 



She added that several projects for energy conservation 
were not included in the capital outlay request since it is hoped 
that funding for this purpose will come from the BBC. 



*r 



5115 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood said that the preliminary capital outlay 
budget submitted to the state was a maximum figure, submitted witfi 
the understanding that any changes to it would be decreases and 
not increases. He said that the pressure of time had made this 
submission necessary, but the Committee will have the opportunity 
to take a hard look at the five-year needs of the University. 
Chairman Spiller expressed his belief that the University should 
keep its request to the barest minimum because of the financial 
condition of the Commonwealth. 

Trustee Burack said she was surprised that no funds 
were included in the capital outlay request for equipment and 
refurbishment of the College of Public and Community Services, 
which needs some amount of basic maintenance. Chancellor Golino 
replied that it would, of course, be desirable to have money for 
these purposes, but in the matter of priorities, there were other 
more urgent items. 

Secretary Hardy said that after the hearings on the 
campuses, it is planned that materials will be assembled for 
submission to both the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and the 
Committee on Budget and Finance for action at a joint meeting of 
these committees on November 30. 

Chairman Spiller once more raised the question of why 
the University should pay for the errors of the Bureau of Build- 
ing Construction, emphasizing that of the $12.5 million capital 
outlay request for FY 1978 $3.5 was the result of problems outside 
the control of the University. He said he thought the request 
should clearly state that this $3.5 requested is not for addition 
al capital outlay by the University, but is required to correct 
errors of other parties. 

Chairman Spiller questioned the $2 million figure for 
handicapped access at UM/Amherst. Chancellor Bromery said that 
this is necessary to comply with Massachusetts law and covers 
facilities within buildings as well as sidewalk ramps. Trustee 
Clark emphasized the importance of these facilities. 



Trustee Burack next inquired whether the $3 million re- 
quested for furnishings and equipment for the Hospital at UM/Wor- 
cester was a figure resulting from the original projection for 
the hospital. Mrs. Robinson replied that this amount was well 
within the overall cost estimated for equipping the hospital and 
included prior requests which had not been granted. It is the 
amount, she said, that the Chancellor believes is necessary for 
limited expansion of the medical services. In addition, hospital 
equipment requires a long lead time to purchase and install. She 
said that the current number of 22,000 out-patients a year is ex- 
pected to double. Mr. Greig said that the Chancellor will compl} 
with critical need requirements on all new equipment. 



I 



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117 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Spiller suggested that the President's Office 
finish reviewing the five-year capital outlay plans with the cam- 
puses and that the Committee discuss the matter again at its next 
meeting. 

Trustee Dennis asked for some background on the Tillson 
Power Plant before the building tour began. Mr. Littlefield brief 
ly summarized the problem, saying that in 1968 the master plan at 
that time involved the need for a new power plant. Jackson & 
Moreland, Engineers, was commissioned to design it. The project 
included three phases - the purchase of new boilers, the construc- 
tion of a new building, and the construction of a steam line con- 
necting the new plant with the old. The reason for the connection 
between the new and the old plant was that the old plant contained 
the distribution center controlling the steam lines to all campus 
facilities and there was no need to replace the distribution centejr. 
The new plant was placed in a remote site due to environmental con- 
cerns and the fact that the master plan for the campus at that time 
called for further growth. Also a factor was the difficulty of 
replacing the old plant on its present site while it was still in 
use. The steam line connecting the new plant to the old failed to 
function when put into use. The question to be answered is why it 
failed. The BBC commissioned consultants to determine the reason 
and also asked the original designer to submit a solution to the 
problem. Jackson & Moreland said a problem in the expansion jointjs 
occurred when the steam was sent in the reverse direction, which 
was necessary to start up the plant. Whatever the cause, said Mr. 
Littlefield, the line doesn't work. The BBC is responsible for 
the contracts with the designer and the contractor, and the Univer- 
sity has not yet accepted the building. However, the University 
must live with the results of the problem, whatever the cause, 
until it is corrected. 

Trustee Clark asked if the capital outlay request for 
equipment and furnishings would increase the capacity of the Medi- 
cal Center to perform the various health services contemplated and 
also increase the revenue from the Hospital. She received an af- 
firmative reply. She also inquired what was happening with regard 
to the construction of the gymnasium at UM/Boston. Mrs. Robinson 
replied that Secretary Parks had written a letter to Chancellor 
Golino asking several questions with regard to the gym, to which 
Chancellor Golino had already replied. She said the answers to 
the questions raised by Secretary Parks had been available for at 
least two years, but, nevertheless, the Chancellor had again an- 
swered them. Chairman Spiller made reference to the so-called 
"shell game" that he had identified at the previous Board meeting, 
and said that at least the "pea" had now been located. Trustee 
Clark said that Secretary Parks' stated belief that the community 
was not interested in the gymnasium was erroneous. The community 
was very much interested in its construction, she said. She sug- 
gested that Secretary Parks be asked when this matter would be re- 
solved and that the Board be asked to take action which would expe 



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11/3/76 



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B&G Comm. 
11/3/76 



DM/ Amherst— 

Building 
Acceptances 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

dite the resolution. Mrs. Robinson said that each time the gymna- 
sium is delayed, the cost increases, plans then have to be modi- 
fied and the result will be that there is less gym for the money 
already appropriated. It was agreed that this matter would be 
aired at the meeting of the full Board later in the day. 

The Committee departed at 10:40 a.m. for the building 
inspection tour. After inspecting the various buildings, the com- 
mittee on motion made and seconded, 



VOTED 



and 



VOTED 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it accept 
the Bus Storage Facility at the Amherst Campus as 
completed in accordance with plans and specifications 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it accept 
the Addition to the Infirmary at the Amherst Campus 
as completed in accordance with plans and specifica- 
tions . 



and further 



VOTED 



and also 



VOTED 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it accept 
the Graduate Research Center II at the Amherst Campus, 
as completed in accordance with plans and specifica- 
tions subject, however, to the completion and/or cor- 
rection of items on a list dated September 16, 1976 
and on file with the Director of Physical Plant, Am- 
herst Campus. 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it accept 
the Fine Arts Center at the Amherst campus, as com- 
pleted in accordance with plans and specifications 
subject, however, to the completion and/or correction 
of items on a list dated March 11, 1976 and on file 
with the Director of Physical Plant, Amherst Campus; 
further, that the foregoing acceptance shall not con- 
stitute acceptance of the lighting system and the 
sound system for said Fine Arts Center. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



Cu-£ji~£-j 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keitn Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-6- 



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ATTENDANCE 



I 



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Trustees Croce, Shaler, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Carlson, Gordon, Robertson, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 3, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Board Room, Third Floor 
Whitmore Hall 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Rowland, Spiller 

Other Trustees: Trustees Breyer, Conti, Cronin; Mrs. Bluestone 



representing Trustee Fielding; Mr. Parks representing Trustee 
Dukakis 

Office of the President: Mr. Janis, Vice President for Management 



and Business Affairs; Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic Af- 
fairs; Mrs. Hanson, Budget Director and Assistant Vice President; 
Counsel O'Leary; Mr. Prussing, Deputy Director, Office of the Budg 
et; Mr. White, The Assistant to the President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Br ornery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 



Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Representative; 
Mr. Federow, Graduate Student Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 



resentative 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Professor Goodman, Department of 



Physiology 

The meeting was called to order at 11:00 a.m. The first 
item on the agenda dealt with the matter of collective bargaining. 
Chairman Healey spoke first, noting that all of the formal pro- 
ceedings before the State Labor Relations Commission had been held 
the bargaining unit determined and that the collective bargaining 
election would be held on December 1 and 2. Since the Board in 
the past has preferred the established governance method, he was 
proposing a general policy vote on governance by the Board for 
guidance to the university administration. In view of the fact 
that there are several new Trustees, he said he felt it a good 
time for the Board to restate its position. President Wood then 
outlined the current situation, noting that faculty concern and 
the forces at work among the faculty that make this of importance 
to them are thoroughly understandable. Four years of rapid growth 
in the seventies, coupled with the denial of cost-of-living and 
merit increases and other restrictions imposed by budget cuts, hav 
led to a serious problem of morale. The administration has recog- 



5119 



Collective 
Bargaining 



■I 



"5120 



Exec. Coram. 
11/3/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

nized this, tried to deal with it, and is acutely aware that 

many faculty members believe they have a set of genuine grievances 

and many believe that collective bargaining can improve matters. 

President Wood then spoke of the brief of the State 
Labor Relations Commission. It deals with inclusions and ex- 
clusions of the bargaining unit and holds that UM/Boston and 
UM/Amherst constitute a single unit. He asked that the record 
show his single exception to the brief. The brief says, in effect 
both parties agree to the appropriateness of collective bargaining 
in an academic context. The Chancellors and the President clearly 
disagree with this assertion. 

The faculties of Boston and Amherst have been told the 
President's views on this matter — that an academic community is 
not necessarily an appropriate setting for collective bargaining 
in an industrial mode. Governance is a more appropriate mech- 
anism for the relationship between faculty and administration. 
The President further stated that he does not believe that ex- 
perience in other institutions which are organized shows an in- 
crease in monetary and budgetary benefits. Finally, he said, 
the faculty clearly has a right to organize if they choose, and 
the central administration is prepared to deal with a union. 
Citing Chancellor Br ornery' s leadership role in the University's 
last collective bargaining effort, the President asked him to 
speak. 



Chancellor Br ornery first introduced the new Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Affairs and Provost, Dr. Paul Puryear , men- 
tioning that Dr. Puryear ' s experience at Florida State University 
would be of great use, having dealt with a collective bargaining 
election there within the last year. Chancellor Bromery then 
gave his own analysis of the situation. The concern of faculty 
members, particularly those leaning towards collective bargaining 
is mostly an economic one. He said he believes that if the vote 
is pro collective bargaining, expectations for economic delivery 
are going to be unrealistically high. In any situation such as 
this, he said, whichever way the vote goes, one hopes that the 
institution will not suffer. 

The State Labor Relations Commission's unit determina- 
tion had raised concern among those who have dealt with unionized 
faculties. The simpler a unit is, the better it is. Unfortunate 
ly, Chancellor Bromery continued, the Commission has devised a 
very complex unit. It contains both the Boston and Amherst cam- 
puses and the unit includes many individuals who do not fall into 
the category of full-time faculty. Included are staff assistants 
and associates, counsellors in the broadest sense, in various 
programs such as the University Without Walls and the University 
Year for Action. As these programs do have a major academic 
thrust, the staff assistants and associates do have some mutual 
interests with faculty, but they also have diverse concerns. 
Recently, the Supreme Court determined that people in a bargainin 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

unit who have diverse concerns must be directly represented in 
the organizational structure and it ruled that in bargaining, 
these diverse concerns and interests must be reflected and 
represented. Further, he said, bargaining with a unit which rep- 
resents diverse interests can be a complicated process requiring 
negotiations lasting up to three years to reach an agreement. 
The unit determination of the Commission calls for a vote for one 
of three alternatives — representation by the Massachusetts 
Society of Professors/Faculty Staff Union/Massachusetts Teachers 
Association/National Education Association, or by the Amherst 
and Boston Chapters of the American Association of University 
Professors, or by no employee organization. The election will 
take place December 1 and 2, 1976. The Chancellor explained that 
if none of the proposed representatives wins a simple majority 
in the first election, a runoff election between the two with the 
most votes will be held in late winter or early spring. 



Chancellor Bromery then discussed some of the results 
if the faculty opted for collective bargaining. The governance 
document (T73-098) currently in force would in effect be inoperative. 
Similar situations at other universities had led to unexpected 
consequences , such as at Florida State where collective bargain- 
ing led to the demise of the faculty senate. Faculty expectations 
of increased benefits will be high, but if these expectations are 
not fulfilled, which would be likely, morale will fall even lower. 
The Chancellor also noted the growing disenchantment of the generajl 
public with public employees at all levels. He recalled the 
final days of the last legislative session when, in discussing a 
supplemental budget, a motion had been introduced proposing the 
abolishment of all collective bargaining laws covering public 
employees. He said he viewed the motion as more a sign of 
frustration than an actual threat, but, he believed the frustra- 
tion stemmed from unions bargaining for non-existent funds. 

In answer to a question, the Chancellor stated that a 
quick study of the costs to the University of collective bargain- 
ing showed that they could be from a quarter to a half million 
dollars due to the need for additional legal help, staffing for 
grievances and professional bargainers. 

Professor Boelcskevy stated that he had no intention 
of minimizing the problems and difficulties of collective bargain- 
ing but he felt it premature to paint as dark a picture as had 
just been drawn. He stressed that the issue of salary was fore- 
most in the minds of faculty but there are several other issues, 
one being governance. The term "effective governance" as used 
in the proposed vote before the Board, he said, would not be 
acceptable to a number of UM/Boston faculty members who do not 
consider the present arrangement to be effective. The UM/Boston 
representatives on the Multicampus Personnel Policy Committee 
of the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee were quite 
dissatisfied last year with the way in which their very strong 






'i'lZl 



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11/3/76 



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Exec. Comm. 
11/3/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

concerns on certain issues were treated through the governance 
mechanism and many felt that bargaining might be a more effective 
way to address personnel matters. Professor Boelcskevy said he 
felt the issue of inclusions and exclusions in the makeup of the 
bargaining unit had been presented in a one-sided manner. It 
could be argued that including all those who share a community of 
interest with the faculty, though not necessarily in the classroom 
would be in tune with the original spirit of the University and 
might benefit the University as a whole. 



Secretary Parks, speaking on the issue from the Govern- 
ment's point of view, stressed the difficulty the administration 
faces in dealing with the collective bargaining contracts negotiated 
separately by the State Colleges, the Community Colleges and the 
other universities. Each of the educational institutions, each 
with their separate bargaining units, submit different contracts 
to the Governor and the Legislature who are going to have to deal 
with them in some manner. These contracts contain a whole variety 
of conditions which have to do with the quality of teaching and 
many other matters as well as with money and, he said, because 
each contract has a different set of standards, the result is 
a "confused mess." Therefore, the inclination of State Govern- 
ment is to "literally step aside" from all of the negotiated 
documents and deal with all the segments equally, based upon 
available funds. The settlement finally concluded with the state 
employees' Alliance would enhance the inclination of the Admin- 
istration, he said, to say that all employees of the State will 
get the same benefits, the same raises as the Alliance unions 
have accepted. Regardless of who is negotiating the contracts 
for the colleges and universities, the demand, he said, is always 
for unavailable funds. 



As far as he is concerned, the Secretary continued, 
the available funds at issue amount to $32 million plus perhaps 
$8 million, and that is what will be distributed to public em- 
ployees. The money for some eighteen thousand people who work 
in the colleges and universities will have to come from within 
that $40 million. The justification for what will happen is 
based upon available funds and therefore the only thing for him 
to do, he said, is to deal with everyone equally within those 
funds. He said he does not know how this political reality 
I would affect the morale of University faculty, but he has al- 
ready heard that the impact on the faculties of State Colleges 
is demoralizing because they thought their collective bargaining 
contracts had gained them six percent increases each year for 
three years, but that is just not going to happen. He noted 
that funds available to college and university employees are 
finite and bargaining for additional funds that don't exist will 
lead nowhere. 

Mr. Lynton commented on another area of potential 
disillusionment and possible further demoralization; that is 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

misconceiving the relationship between bargaining and governance. 
He cited a recent and precedent-setting ruling of the New Jersey 
State Labor Commission, which held that while wages and salaries 
are mandatory bargaining issues, governance issues are not. He 
stressed the importance of faculty's realizing that collective 
bargaining will not guarantee any change in governance. 

Professor Sulzner said that the faculty probably 
wouldn't even be getting the amount of money that is likely forth- 
coming if there wasn't a union around, and that the Legislature, 
in his judgment, does not have a high regard for the political 
power of the faculty in higher education, which are two reasons 
why the faculty felt the need to organize. He also noted that 
the Faculty Senate does not have to disappear with the advent of 
collective bargaining, and that the faculty's role in the grievance 
process will be strengthened with it because arbitration will be 
involved. Finally, collective bargaining will improve the per- 
sonnel process, as a union, perhaps, will force administrators to 
behave more like administrators. 



Trustee Breyer asked for clarification as to the 
mechanics through which the union would get more money for the 
faculty. The faculty at UMass seems to have done better financially 
than faculties at other institutions in the state. The lack of 
increases recently is very bad, but the Board and the President 
did go to the Legislature and were criticized by some for so 
doing. Will the union strengthen the Board's position before the 
Legislature or will it negotiate directly with the Legislature? 

Chancellor Golino emphasized the danger of the expecta- 
tion that having a union will somehow increase the monies availab! 
to the University, having just been told by the Secretary of 
Education that this was not to be the case. Chancellor Br ornery 
said he didn't think that the Amherst faculty would vote for a 
union if they did not believe that it would result in more fundind 
There is a danger that the institutions will settle for an increase 
in excess of that which the Legislature will appropriate, leading 
to a rearrangement of the budget in order to adhere to a contractual 
agreement . 

Professor Sulzner said that faculty view collective 
bargaining as a vehicle providing an additional access to the 
Legislature. Faculty interests, at least in terms of salaries 
and teaching loads, are easily traded off. This is coupled with 
a mood of anti-intellectualism in the state — a feeling that 
faculty members don't really perform useful jobs, they're over- 
paid, etc. The argument is not that the Board and the President 
do not try to fully represent faculty views, the argument is that 
faculty needs an additional vehicle of access to the Legislature. 

Chairman Healey referred to Trustee Breyer 's request 






Exec. Comm. 
11/3/76 



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Exec. Coram. 
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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for clarification of the mechanism the union would use to achieve 
the desired goals: Would the union work through the Board or 
through the Legislature? Citing his long experience in represent- 
ing the University's interests to the Legislature, he said he 
doubted the ability of the union to radically alter the actions 
of the House Ways and Means Committee. 

Professor Sulzner said that much depended on the 
affiliation the faculty would choose. Faculty members feel that 
their primary missions are teaching and research but they are 
diverted from these by what they perceive as a lack of support. 

President Wood expressed his concern that if all the 
state institutions were to opt for collective bargaining, those 
institutions with strong regional constituencies would probably 
have greater impact on the Legislature than would the University. 

Secretary Parks restated that there were only limited 
funds available and that those interested in real collective 
bargaining should consider joining the organization with the 
greatest political clout. 

Chairman Healey said that the basic purpose of the 
discussion was to adopt a policy on the part of the Board as to 
whether or not Chancellors Bromery and Golino are authorized to 
take a position against the effort to organize and bargain 
collectively. The thing that persuaded him, apart from the concerns 
discussed earlier, was the fact that collective bargaining 
agreements inevitably eroded the authority of management, edu- 
cational or otherwise. Under the laws of the Commonwealth the 
Trustees are given the authority and responsibility for running 
the University. Under a collective bargaining agreement the 
Board will find itself having to negotiate non-monetary issues 
which will invade the ultimate authority of the Board. Over 
the years the Board had been an interested and effective body, 
fighting for those things it found to be in the University's best 
interest, frequently at odds with successive governors because 
of the Board's advocacy. The Board functions well in the present 
atmosphere. If the faculty were being denied input into the 
decisional process, they would be justified in organizing, but 
the governance policy of the University provides for this. 



Trustee Troy said he had long felt that anything that 
would diminish the power of the Board to serve the University 
effectively would be dangerous. When the Board asks the 
Legislature or the Governor for something for the University, they 
know the Board is asking for that which, in the considered judg- 
ment of the Board, is in the best interests of the University. 
The Board has been effective, especially during the sixties and 
seventies when the campuses grew and funds were available to 
attract and support an extremely distinguished faculty. The 
move towards unionization will weaken the power of the Board, he 
said, and this is an ill omen. 



• 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Sulzner said that the faculty's motivation 
towards a union was not anti-Board, but rather that it grew out 
of a feeling of helplessness in a politically unfavorable climate 

Chairman Healey noted that there was no further discus- 
sion and explained that the vote would be delayed until Trustee 
Spiller rejoined the meeting; in his absence there was not a quo- 
rum present. 

He then called on Chancellor Bulger to discuss the docu- 
ment Governance of the Medical School (Doc. T77-028A) . Chancello: 
Bulger said that Professor Goodman had led the effort to see the 
document through to completion and acceptance. It is not perfect, 
he said, but it allows the Medical School to begin a governance 
process and allows for review of its efficacy in two years. 

Professor Goodman pointed out that the intention of the 
campus governance committee had been to distribute participation 
in the affairs of the Medical School as broadly as possible. This 
was also the intent of the elaborate committee structure proposed 
for the school. The document had been reviewed by a variety of 
constituencies — full time faculty, the Chancellor's office, the 
President's office, the associated members of the faculty who prac- 
tice in the community, the part-time faculty, and a student group 

Secretary Hardy said that Trustee Robertson had been 
delayed. Had he been at the meeting, he would have reported that 
the Health Affairs Committee reviewed the document in detail at 
two meetings and at the second meeting had recommended that the 
Executive Committee accept it. 

Trustee Troy initiated a brief colloquy with Chancellor 
Bulger concerning the style of the document: Chancellor Bulger 
conceding that the strength of the authors lay in other fields; 
Trustee Troy acknowledging that golden prose was not often found 
in such documents. 

Chairman Healey said he found the governance arrange- 
ments a little overstructured and noted that the bottom line on 
page two made reference to the Executive Committee when it should 
refer to Executive Council. 

Trustee Cronin asked if there was an effort now under- 
way to have a student government association. Chancellor Bulger 
replied that an effort was being made and the resulting organiza- 
tion would interact with governance at the School. In reply to a 
further question, Professor Goodman said that the students who 
worked on the governance committee had been selected by the stu- 
dents. 

Trustee Croce said one point that raised comment was on 



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5125 



Exec. Comm. 
11/3/76 



UM/Worcester — 

Governance of 

the Medical 

School 

(Doc. T77-028A) 



"5126 



Exec. Coram. 
11/3/76 



Delegation 
of Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

page ten, dealing with quorums. Paragraph three states, "Require 
ment for a quorum may be waived provided the Secretary makes a 
reasonable effort to contact a sufficient number of committee 
members so that an expression of opinion may be obtained from 
two-thirds of the membership." The point at issue is that this 
device could be used surreptitiously to obtain results that might 
be detrimental. Chancellor Bulger explained that it was devised 
to cover emergency situations peculiar to medical schools. 

Trustee Troy said he found it to be a good document in 
general, but wondered at the lack of detail regarding the Provost 
the chief academic officer. Professor Goodman said the role of 
the Provost has yet to be defined, and as the role is defined it 
will be incorporated into the specifics of the document. 

It was moved and seconded 

MOTION : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

and adopt the Governance Document for the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Medical School as set forth 
in Trustee Document T77-028A. 

Chairman Healey indicated the vote would be taken at 
the reconvened meeting. 

Secretary Hardy explained the final item on the agenda. 
At its meeting of January 7, 1976, the Executive Committee had 
acted for the Board because the Board does not normally meet 
during January. There were several issues of urgent concern for 
the Medical Center that had to be dealt with, including the author- 
ization of the Chancellor to negotiate inter-agency agreements. 
The Executive Committee may act on behalf of the Board, therefore 
there was no need to ratify the Committee's actions; however, 
counsel is concerned as negotiations are continuing and is asking 
if the Committee's action could be reaffirmed by the Board at 
this time. This committee need not act on this matter, but an 
action would be presented at the Board meeting. 

Counsel O'Leary said that the January 7 vote of the 
Executive Committee did two things: First, it authorized execution 
of the inter-agency agreement; this created no problems. Second 
it recommended that the Chancellor be authorized to negotiate 
future such agreements; for the sake of clarity the Board is 
being asked to vote to accept this recommendation. Chairman 
Healey said he would bring the matter to the Board's attention. 

At 12:00 noon the meeting adjourned subject to recall 
by the Chair at 12:30 p.m. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was reconvened at 12:30 p.m. 
seconded and 



It was moved, 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees continue 
to endorse as effective governance arrangements 
the existing organization and processes of the 
University so as to maintain the traditional 
relationship between faculty, administration, 
and the Board of Trustees. 



and further 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and adopt the Governance Document for the 
University of Massachusetts Medical School as 
set forth in Trustee Document T77-028A. 



The meeting adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 




^c^JuLj^ 



Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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11/3/76 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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NOT USED 



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ATTENDANCE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

November 22, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 
Room SF1-4 
Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Committee Members and Committee Staff: Chairman Robertson; Trus- 



tee Croce; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Secretary 
Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Abrams , McNeil and Okin 



Office of the President: Mr. Eller, Associate Vice President for 



University Policy 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 



5129 



Health Affairs; Dr. Wheeler, Chairman of the Group Practice Advi- 
sory Board; Mr. Fellner, Comptroller's Office; Mr. Ference, Group 
Practice Administrator 

The meeting was called to order at 12:45 p.m. The first 
item of business was the Chancellor's Agenda. Chancellor Bulger 
spoke first, at Chairman Robertson's invitation. Chancellor Bulgejr 
said he wished to speak briefly on the existing financial situa- 
tion of the Medical School and comment on the long term prospects. 
He hoped his remarks would lead to raising the important question 
of how much money should be invested in the School as a school, 
in other words, what is the goal of the investment in the School. 

He said the School was experiencing the widespread budget 
crunch and was faced with a budgetary shortfall. He had discussed 
the problems, along with possible solutions to them, with the Fac- 
ulty. The chief reason for the expected shortfall was the stag- 
gering cost of heating and lighting the building; other reasons 
included the costs of library materials, photocopying and antici- 
pated increase in premium for malpractice insurance. Where possiblle, 
cut backs are being made - by replacing some of the fluorescent 
bulbs in the light banks by ballasting, a 60 percent cost saving 
had been achieved along with an improvement in the quality of the 
illumination; photocopying facilities were now under tighter con- 
trol; the library was no longer buying expensive, non-course medi- 
cal volumes, many of which become out of date two or three years 
after they appear; and efforts are being made to increase the effi 
ciency of the building's air handling units. Unfortunately, there 
are areas where the School must resign itself to inflation, e.g. 
malpractice insurance costs have gone from $125 thousand to $170 
thousand. Further efforts to run a tighter operation will continuje 

Chancellor Bulger noted that the Hospital operated with 
a fixed budget. Staff were, however, raising the need for resolv- 
ing personnel procedural problems and bringing people in so as to 
properly staff the intensive care unit at higher grades. These 



Chancellor ' s 
Agenda 



o 



130 



Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

were but instances of the array of problems encountered. 

In addition to external factors such as inflation, he 
continued, the Hospital's problems were problems of success, the 
facility is "just taking off." In October the overall occupancy 
rate was 80 percent and the Hospital has been basically full much 
of the time, especially the Intensive Care Unit. This puts pres- 
sure on the units which are understaffed, such as some of the lab- 
oratories. The Hospital has yet to achieve an economy of scale. 
The Chancellor expressed his belief that UM/Worcester was coming 
to grips with the situation and would soon be running with the 
requisite tightness, ever mindful of the dangers of running the 
operation so tightly that it has negative effects on staff morale. 
These effects could tear down that which has been built so care- 
fully. 

He said that morale in the basic science departments is 
very high, perhaps higher than it has ever been, while morale in 
the clinical sciences is very low. He felt the situation in the 
clinical departments is related to the staff being told in January 
to grow rapidly and then, as the dimensions of the budget situation 
became clear, being told to slow down, because of the danger of 
running out of money before the end of the fiscal year. Also, 
there are frustrations in working within the state system - oper- 
ating a successful unit which obviously generated income sufficient 
to allow growth and then being told there are no funds for growth 
because revenues go to the State coffers. This led to sending 
potential and desirable patients elsewhere. Steps are being taken 
to resolve this situation. 

In speaking to the point of where the School was going 
he noted that in 1974/75 the operating costs of all U.S. medical 
schools, not including the cost of operating a teaching hospital, 
averaged $14.5 million, the budgets ranging from $3.6 million up 
to $36 million. The average annual, per student cost nationally 
was $30+ thousand. UM/Worcester 's current budget is $9 million, 
and the annual per student cost is $29,000. If next year's budget 
is to be $11.5 million, the annual per student cost will be about 
$30,000. 

If fully developed, the School will have 200 FTE faculty 
members, the number originally planned for. Currently, there are 
120 FTE faculty, including the administration, with approval for 
59 additional faculty. Assuming an inflation rate of eight per- 
cent and including the cost of residency training, the cost of 
which should probably not be in the School's budget, a 200 FTE 
faculty, with support help at a modest level, would need a budget 
of $15.7 million. If residency costs, which now are included in 
the educational budget, are relocated, and if there is an inflatidn 
rate of six percent, $14 million would be adequate. 

Dr. Caper, adding to the Chancellor's report, noted some 
of the actions that had been taken in the Hospital in order to 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



v»13i 



Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



curtail expenditures. In response to the heavy use of the Hospital 
and with the census ranging from 75 to 90 percent, the Executive j 
Committee of the Medical Staff has voted to establish a priority j 
of insuring that emergency admissions take precedence over elective 
admissions. The result of this priority will be the occasional 
cancellation of some elective surgery. Attempts are being made tp 
limit use of the emergency room by informing local ambulance serv- 
ices, on a day to day basis, whether the emergency room is open or 
not. Outpatient Clinic appointments are scheduled so as to restrain 
its rate of growth. The number of staff in the Hospital is essen- 
tially frozen at its present level, and the only people employed 
now are those who have been determined to be essential to patient 
care and safety. Another area which has been deemed essential is 
the billing and collection operation, as it is necessary to produce 
income. He said the budget dictates that the Hospital's activities 
and current use remain at the present levels for the rest of this 
fiscal year. 

Chairman Robertson asked if informing the ambulance serv- 
ices that the Emergency Room was not open meant that a person in 
need of immediate medical attention would be turned away. Dr. 
Caper explained that the ambulance services were told that if they 
had an option they should take it. Patients are not being turned 
away. 

In response to Trustee Croce's question about disaster 
preparedness, Dr. wheeler said the Hospital did have a general 
disaster plan and there were Army surplus supplies at hand in case 
of need. An effective regional plan is yet to be developed. He 
referred to the discussion on instructing ambulances where to take 
patients, saying such coordination is not a bad idea and probably 
will be standard practice in all hospitals in the future, when 
emergency networks and effective communications have been established. 

Chairman Robertson said it was his understanding that 
the desire for a trust fund, in which the Hospital's receivable 
accounts are placed, is to allow the Hospital to use these funds 
for expansion, thus increasing its capacity to generate more funds. 
He asked if it would be a monetary plus or minus in the long run, 
if the Hospital could expand services according to need rather 
than imposing cutbacks such as Dr. Caper had described. Dr. Caper 
said if the revenues could be retained, it would allow for planned 
and accountable expansion to occur, which is not now the case. 
The staff would need to be increased, as the Clinical Services are 
now functionally fully extended and any increase in activity, given 
the present staff, would compromise the quality of care. 

Chairman Robertson asked if staff were added to the Out- 
patient Clinic and services expanded would the Clinic be self-sup- 
porting. Cautioning that hospitals as a whole always require some 
form of subsidy, Dr. Caper said an expanded clinic would be self- 



-3- 



-5132 

Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

supporting if the Hospital could retain the income. 

Chancellor Bulger said that in some areas, for example 
in Boston, clinic services are very costly. MGH found it to be 
better to invest in the in-patient area, in terms of dollar return 
Dr. Wheeler said it would be better in terms of cost efficiency if 
the Hospital had more patients in the hospital and performed more 
services. The Department of Surgery loses much less money in 
treating four cases a week than when treating two; the Hospital 
loses less money if there are 200 patients instead of 75, because 
of the need for certain basic support regardless of the number of 
patients. Cost efficiency requires a certain critical mass, which 
has yet to be attained, added Chancellor Bulger. 



Trustee Croce said that even with a trust fund almost aljl 
teaching hospitals need additional financial support. Even good 
private hospitals need to be subsidized somehow. He expected this 
would be the case with UM/Worcester . Dr. Wheeler agreed, noting 
that the Teaching Hospital is reimbursed on the basis of the lesser 
of costs or charges - there is no way to turn a profit. Mr. Fellnjer 
said that third party payers define costs in a restrictive manner. 
In expanding to a further 25 or 30 beds, the inventory of supplies! 
would have to be built up and the inventory build up is not recog- 
nized as an allowable cost. The cost is allowed as the supplies 
are consumed. Staffing is treated in the same way, there is a 
lead time in building up to the additional capacity, and it isn't 
until later that the effect is felt. The assumption would have to 
be made that the patients occupying newly opened beds would have 
the same general level of insurance coverage as do the patients 
presently in the Hospital. If another floor were opened just to 
accommodate patients that do not have insurance coverage, it woulc 
not break even, even in the longer run. 

Mrs. Bluestone said one of the biggest problems is the 
difficulty of running any 75 bed hospital in a cost effective way. 
Given UM/Worcester 's physical plant, she stressed, it was impossi-j 
ble to run the hospital for 75 patients, but with increased numbers 
of patients a smaller net cost would result. 

Chancellor Bulger said that six months ago he had tried 
to explain to the Committee why there were so few patients, now 
the situation was reversed and there were too many patient refer- 
rals, and that the pressure of this would continue. He was con- 
cerned about referring patients elsewhere. Dr. Wheeler said the 
faculty was very concerned about the effect of turning people 
away and, by so doing, "turning them off." The clinical faculty 
is concerned because the situation is not analagous to a spigot - 
if patients are turned away because of a lack of beds, their phy- 
sicians may not refer future patients to UM/Worcester when beds 
are available. 

At the Chairman's request, Dr. Caper spoke of the pro- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



*" t?4 



ojL33 



Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



posed hospital rate increases. He said the Hospital administra- 
tion, with the approval and endorsement of the Hospital Management University 
Board, was requesting a rate increase which would bring the Hospi4 Teaching 
tal's rates, for rooms and ancillary charges, into line with those: Hospital Rate 
of the major teaching hospitals in Boston. Since present costs Increases 
exceed charges by a very great margin, any decision as to the size (Doc. T77-037) 
of the increase is somewhat arbitrary. The increase sought was 
selected by the administration as a defensible and understandable 
increase in comparison with other teaching hospitals in the state, 
The state treasury will gain a net increase in revenue. Since the 
great majority of the Hospitals' in-patients are covered by either 
private or federal insurance plans, and given the Hospital's lib- 
eral policies toward uninsured patients, the increase will not woifk 
hardships on them. Because out-patients are less well insured, nc 
request is being asked for outpatient charges. The requested rate: 
increases, to become effective January 1, 1977 are: 

Acute semi-private rooms: from $125 daily to $155 daily. 

Acute private rooms: from $150 daily to $185 daily. 

Intensive care: from $315 daily to $440 daily. 

Ancillary charges: a 30 percent across the board increase, 
with a change in charging methods in medical surgical sup- 
plies and pharmaceuticals from a flat daily rate to charge|s 
based on usage. 

The increases will make the Hospital's rates identical 
to those at Massachusetts General, and somewhat below those at 
Beth Israel. He asked that the Committee recommend to the Budget 
and Finance Committee and the Board that this request be approved 
for transmittal to the State Rate Setting Commission (RSC) . Trus- 
tee Croce moved that this be accepted. Chairman Robertson called 
for discussion. 

Mrs. Bluestone said that hospital charges and costs are 
a major topic of interest to the Dukakis administration. She saic 
Commissioner Fielding asked her to express his concern, particularly 
on two points: first, the inadequacy of support documentation jus- 
tifying the request for the rate increases; and secondly, the pos- 
sible conflict of this request with the recently passed hospital 
cost control legislation (Chapter 409 of 1976) supported by the 
Department of Public Health to limit charges. The passage of this 
bill required an enormous amount of effort on the part of the ad- 
ministration in combating the resistance of the private hospitals 
and trade-offs had to be worked out. The lack of information sup- 
porting the requested increases, such as a breakdown of charges, 
made it difficult to determine whether it would comply with the 
new hospital rate charge bill. She stressed that if the request 
went to the Rate Setting Commission without more detailed documen- 
tation, it would face very "tough sledding." It was parochial, she 
said, to say that the increases would save the people of the Com- 
monwealth money, because anything that increases health dollars 
comes out of the pockets of all the people of Massachusetts. Hos- 



-5- 



"5134 



Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pitals in the private sector would oppose the request and the RSC 
would want to know about the Hospital's cost efficiency, and why 
already available beds in Worcester weren't being used. She pre- 
dicted trouble unless the RSC received a far more detailed ration- 
ale. 

Mr. Fellner said the Hospital vis a vis the 95 percent 
floor is well within the statutory guidelines allowing for a rate 
increase request. The cost per day for the '77 budget year will 
be $472; the charges per day, even had the rate increase been in 
effect on July 1, 1976, would be $310, representing an annual costj/ 
charge ratio of about 140 percent, well above the 95 percent floo 
If the ratio falls below 95 percent, it would mean the Hospital 
is operating at a profit. The Hospital administration, he contin 
ued , had prepared the forms required by the Chapter 409 hospital 
cost control legislation. The information required on these forms 
which will be submitted to the RSC, gives very detailed backgrounc 
Acknowledging the possible inappropriateness of presuming the pos 
ture of the RSC, he said he believed the RSC would be in favor of 
the increases because the costs exceed the charges so significant 
The cost control legislation was passed with the goal of reducing 
the total deficit of the Commonwealth, Mr. Fellner said, original-*- 
ly by restricting welfare reimbursement in particular. In the 
case of the Hospital, the RSC realized that if the Hospital's 
charges are at a lesser amount rather than a greater amount, then 
there are third party payer monies that the Commonwealth will not 
receive. Before the Hospital opened the RSC urged that the pro- 
posed rates be almost doubled. Mrs. Bluestone said this had hap- 
pened before all of last year's activities and the passing of the 
new bill. 



Mr. Fellner stressed that the RSC was aware of the costs 
of opening a new facility and of operating it at less than optima] 
level. The RSC has assumed its responsibility to insure that the 
Commonwealth receive funds properly due it and therefore opposes 
increasing the state's total deficit due to the operation of the 
Teaching Hospital. He agreed that any increase in the amount of 
health dollars would eventually increase costs for everyone, but 
it was prudent management for the Hospital to shift costs from the: 
tax base of the Commonwealth to the federal government and private; 
insurers when possible. 

Trustee Croce said that if the Hospital's deficit is 
increased due to operating costs, this would necessitate going to 
the Legislature with a request for increasing the budget. He 
stressed that the Hospital needed a trust fund, noting that the 
closer the Hospital comes to breaking even, the better its public 
image will be. 

Mrs. Bluestone felt it placed a burden on the state to 
ask that the Teaching Hospital be allowed to come in at 140 or 14-> 
percent while holding private sector facilities to 95 percent. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

She felt that the Teaching Hospital was in effect asking that the 
law be amended or broken. She asked that the problem be looked 
at in its totality. Mr. Fellner responded that the 145 percent 
represented a cost-to-charge ratio and that an institution is in 
better fiscal shape the lower that percentage is. If the request- 
ed rate increases are granted, the RSC will not be treating the 
Hospital more favorably than other institutions. He said the in- 
crease of 30 percent would bring the Hospital's cost/charge ratio 
down from its present cost-to-charge ratio of 200 percent to 140 
percent. If rates are increased again by an additional 40 percent 
the Hospital's cost-to-charge ratio would be about 95 percent. Thje 
Hospital's charges would then be greater than its costs. Under 
these circumstances the RSC would not be willing to approve any 
additional rate increase requests. 

Mrs. Bluestone said she had received phone calls that 
would indicate that this might not be the case. There has been 
much talk about "total health care dollars," and everyone is enor- 
mously sensitive about letting state facilities do something that 
private facilities cannot do. In her opinion, if this issue is 
not raised by the RSC, it will be raised by the Massachusetts 
Hospital Association and other private provider groups. 

Chancellor Bulger said that what was really needed was 
to increase the Hospital's capacity to 200 beds. If a subsidy to 
achieve this goal were forthcoming, there would be no need for ratje 
increases. The Hospital cannot remain at eighty beds and become 
cost effective. 

In response to Mrs. Bluestone's question, Mr. Fellner 
said he did not foresee a negative response from Blue Cross. The 
increased rates would be at the level of the Boston teaching hos- 
pitals, further, given the RSC's partial jurisdiction over Blue 
Cross through the contract approval mechanism, he felt that the 
RSC would be concerned with any adverse reactions that Blue Cross 
might have. 



Chancellor Bulger asked Mrs. Bluestone if, in her view, 
asking for the increases was merely politically unwise, or did she 
think it was in some way detrimental to UM/Worcester ' s interests. 
Mrs. Bluestone said that the Department of Public Health, of late 
found it virtually impossible to do anything without being seen as 
treating state facilities more favorably than the private ones. 
She felt the rate increases would be seen by some in this light. 



Trustee Croce pointed out that positions and salaries fqr 
nurses in the Teaching Hospital had undergone changes and been im-j 
proved because of the number of and service requirements for terti- 
ary patients in such hospitals. He found it odd to say that this 
argument did not apply with equal force, when the Hospital itself 
applied for the rate increases due to increasing costs. 



*"oJL3S 



Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



-7- 



-5136 

Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



Group Practice 
Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Bluestone said inconsistencies were rife in the 
budgetary process. She cited the case of a state hospital that 
had run a deficit of $15,000 in fiscal '77. The Public Health 
Department had planned to upgrade the hospital so that, at a con- 
servative estimate, it would show a surplus of $508,000 in fiscal 
'78. Instead, budget cuts were imposed and the hospital under 
these circumstances is expected to show a deficit of $287,000. 

Mr. Fellner said the Hospital was not seeking favored 
treatment, it simply wanted the law applied equally in all cases. 
Chairman Robertson noted that the Trustees, the University Admin- 
istration, and UM/Worcester were all charged with the responsible 
management of the facility and all must move forward. 

Secretary Hardy asked Mrs. Bluestone for clarification 
on the possibility of the RSC violating provisions of the new bill 
if it granted the proposed increases. Mrs. Bluestone said she 
didn't know and that the RSC could handle the matter in a variety 
of ways . 

There being no further questions the motion was moved, 
seconded and it was 

VOTED : To concur in the need for rate increases as outlined 
in Document T77-037 for the University of Massachu- 
setts Teaching Hospital and to recommend to the Com- 
mittee on Budget and Finance that it recommend to the 
Board of Trustees its approval that said rate increasjes 
be requested from the Rate Setting Commission. 

Mrs. Bluestone voted against the motion. 

Chancellor Bulger, at the request of Chairman Robertson, 
continued the orientation discussion on the Group Practice Plan 
which had begun at the previous meeting of the Committee. He saic 
that such plans took a variety of forms and the one at UM/Worcester 
was based on the general principle of setting up a group practice 
which is based on the entire group, rather than on departmental 
segments. Under the present plan all monies received go into the 
Group Practice Trust Fund, which is controlled by the Dean of the 
Medical School. Salaries are paid by the trust fund, then dis- 
bursements are made by the Dean to a variety of recipients accord- 
ing to priorities he would establish, and overages might then be 
given to the clinical departments. Speaking as a Dean, he said that 
controlling the funds had a surface attraction; however, this sys- 
tem meant there was little or no incentive for the high earning 
departments to earn more than just the amount needed to pay their 
members in the group practice. When group practice plans are based 
on revenues going to the clinical departments, with each department 
determining the disbursement of any overages after the compensaticn 
commitments have been met, then it forces the chairmen and the de- 
partments to take a more active management role. In such plans a 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

certain portion of the overage goes to the dean for support of 
general needs. The portions range from 10 to 90 percent. Under 
such a system, the Dean can exercise some control over the depart- 
ments through the allocation of income from other sources; for 
example, departments with a high income from the plan might receivje 
less state money. 

Dr. Wheeler stressed that the goal of a departmental 
based plan was to benefit the whole institution, not the individual 
departments. He said it would give each Chairman more of a sense 
of responsibility, more motivation to work for the department and 
the institution. There would be less tendency to confront the 
Dean with demands. He noted that practice in many schools has 
shown that the policy of departmental return has been the most 
productive. The plan that was originally proposed at UM/Worcester 
included the concept of identifiable departmental contributions 
and returns. The proposal never reached the Board of Trustees be- 
cause of concern that the fund should be schoolwide and fear that 
otherwise there would be departmental empire building. 

Dr. Wheeler said that under the present plan there is 
provision for departmental return after other commitments are met, 
but no guarantee that it will be forthcoming. Problems caused by 
the present plan include: difficulty in recruiting faculty becaus 
high-earning clinicians who have been in situations where they havje 
had discretionary use of some of the monies they have generated 
don't like to change; there has been difficulty in getting present 
high earning faculty into the plan, the specialty that earns the 
most money is not in the group practice plan; there are potentially 
high earning departments which haven't developed, partly because 
of lack of confidence as to what their role and responsibility 
will be in developing their professional programs, due to the lack 
of guarantees that any of the monies their programs generated woul 
be used for purposes that are their main interest; and finally, as 
non-earners load up the plan, the plan will go broke. The projec- 
tion for this year at UM/Worcester is that the plan will go broke 
because of too many non-earners. 

Dr. Wheeler said he felt that the school was going to 
have to follow the route that is now the conventional one, some 
sort of compromise. The situation is comparable to that of indi- 
vidual salaries. The practice of full-time salaries has resulted 
in some people not working to full capacity. A system where peop] 
put everything in their own pockets has resulted in abuses and in 
people not doing their best for the school. Therefore, he said, 
compromise was necessary. The biggest benefit of the revisions oi 
the plan under consideration is not money, it is that it puts re- 
sponsibility for programmatic development squarely in the laps of 
departmental chairmen. 



Chairman Robertson asked if it was correct that the high 
earners are those with less than two-thirds appointments, as those 






Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



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Health Affairs 
11/22/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with two thirds or more appointments were by mandate included in 
the plan. Chancellor Bulger said that under the provision of the 
plan an associate membership goes to those people who do more thai" 
half of their clinical practice outside of the Teaching Hospital. 
At present there are two people in this category and will likely 
remain there because the stipulations of the present plan permit 
this. Dr. Wheeler said there were other high earners who can 
operate in other places but do most of their work at the teaching 
hospital and are therefore members of the group practice, but they 
want to see the ground rules changed or not be considered members 
of the group if the situation is not changed. He said there was 
a pernicious set of circumstances whereby people could choose to 
do less than 50 percent of their work at the Teaching Hospital in 
order to achieve financial gain and not be bound by the rules and 
regulations of the present Group Practice Plan. 

Mrs. Bluestone said she presumed changes in the group 
practice plan had to ultimately be approved by the Board but she 
wasn't sure what the preliminary steps were. Chancellor Bulger 
said the Group Practice Plan document is to be reviewed by the 
Board in May of 1977. In preparation for the review, the School 
has been looking at what has happened and examining possible 
changes. The Board review will be the first supra-campus examina- 
tion of the plan and for this reason the Health Affairs Committee 
was being apprised of the School's deliberations. Secretary 
Hardy said the matter would ultimately go to the Executive Commit- 
tee for its action, but the hope was that the Health Affairs Com- 
mittee would become so familiar with the various problems, ramifi- 
cations, etc., that when the time comes for specific recommendations 
amending the group plan, the committee can be the body that famil- 
iarizes the rest of the Board with the issues. 

Mrs. Bluestone asked what internal review is presently 
going on and if a structure was emerging. Chancellor Bulger said 
there had been a great deal of discussion and thinking about the 
matter among the faculty, and there had been many reactions forth- 
coming. During the next six weeks he will meet with appropriate 
people and try to come to some position. He did not foresee any 
problem in coming up with a proposal that would represent the con- 
sensus of almost the entire faculty. Dr. Wheeler added that the 
Finance Committee of the Group Practice has been asked to make a 
recommendation to the Group Practice Advisory Board. Independently 
of that there have been discussions in the Chancellor's Office and 
the President's Office. The Group Practice members have a clear 
idea of the way they want things to go. However, since no vote 
has been taken, it is not known yet if there is unanimity of con- 
cern. Most want to go to a departmental structure and to establish 
a situation where the Group Practice doesn't get so overloaded with 
non-earners that it never breaks even. Many of those who could 
help balance the books will not join unless they are guaranteed 
the latter will not happen. He noted that one of the original 
ideas was that the Group Practice Advisory Board would advise the 



-10- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor on commitments for disbursements, realizing there will 
be debits in low-earning departments, such as Family Practice and 
Pediatrics. Personnel commitments had been made in such a fashior. 
that the Advisory Board has not been able to perform its review 
function properly, and there are commitments of $1.6 million with 
nowhere near that amount of income. 



In response to a question about the issue of full-time 
vs. less-than-half-time participation, Dr. wheeler said members of 
the group feel strongly that there should not be a double standarc , 
everybody should play by the same rules. Chancellor Bulger clari- 
fied by adding that everyone was playing by the present rules, but 
in order not to have different standards it would be necessary to 
change a few rules and regulations. Dr. Wheeler stressed that 
everyone had been conforming to the rules and regulations; howevei 
the current system has allowed, in effect, two classes of citizens 
to develop. This wasn't originally contemplated. 

Chancellor Bulger said that one of the reasons it had 
not been an optimum time to say to department chairmen that they 
were free agents is that the resources to correct problems have 
not been available. Though the plan has been overloaded with non- 
earners, there has been the potential for breaking even in terms c 
services rendered, but the billing and collection system is not 
functioning well enough. The system has now been computerized anc 
due bills will be collected. 

Mr. Eller said it was important to remember that the re- 
view of the Group Practice, and particularly the rules and regula- 
tions established by the Board, has to take place under the con- 
straints of the statute which originally established the Group 
Practice Trust Fund. Since the statute lays down specific priori 
ties and operating procedures, the review has to be done within 
the parameters of the statute. While recommendation for statutory 
change is appropriate, alterations prior to a statutory change 
must occur within the existing law. 



In answer to a question, Dr. Wheeler said that he was nc 
certain if the lack of flexible funding was the central reason 
some potential clinicians did not join the faculty; however it was 
a dominant topic of discussion. It has been a major consideratior 
of three or four people the School was interested in. He also 
pointed out that the statute governing the Group Practice had beer 
submitted without, in his view, full review by the Medical School 

Chairman Robertson urged that any change considered 
should give priority to making the plan work and should not exac- 
erbate any tension between the Clinical Sciences departments and 
those of the Basic Sciences. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee, and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 

Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 

-11- 






Health Affairs 
11/22/76 




"5140 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



\ 



NOT USED 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

November 22, 1976; 3:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



ATTENDANCE: Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Shaler; President Wood; 
Trustees Conti and Cronin; Mrs. Kaplan representing Commissioner 
Okin; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Anrig, Eddy, Gordon, McNeil 
and Morgenthau 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Bench, Associate Counsel to the University; Mrs. Sim- 
mons, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs; Ms. Taylor, 
Assistant to the Director, Office of the Budget 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs; Mr. James, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Af- 
fairs; Ms. Furman, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Fineblatt, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs: 
Mr. Topulos, UM/Worcester student 

Guests : Mr. Morgan, Executive Director, MassPIRG; Ms. Michaelson 
MassPIRG 

The meeting was called to order at 3:40 p.m. Chairman 
Shaler said that the first item on the agenda was a report on 
MassPIRG and there would be a vote on the matter after discussion 



Report on 
MassPIRG 
(Doc. T77-044) 



He felt constrained to say that as a Trustee, and as Chairman 
of the Committee, he had been dismayed by some of the rhetoric 
that has been generated as a result of the review of MassPIRG by 
the Board. The Trustees had a right and responsibility to examine 
MassPIRG, as well as any other program at the University. He noted 
that he had received letters, as had the Secretary's Office, and 
articles had appeared in the Collegian , all supporting MassPIRG. 
He said that if he had been "on the fence" on this issue, the ir- 
responsible accusations in some of the letters and articles would 
have made it difficult for him to support the continuance of Mass- 
PIRG at the University. He asked Mr. Lynton to discuss the report 
at hand . 

Mr. Lynton began by introducing Mrs. Simmons, the new 
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, particularly on 
student matters. He said that he shared Chairman Shaler' s dismay 



"5142 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at the tone of the writing of some of MassPIRG's supporters. He 
then briefly summarized the University's relationship with Mass- 
PIRG. The organization first came to the Board's attention in 
1972, when a petition based on a student referendum, showing that 
more than 50 percent of the students at Amherst were interested ifr 
affiliating with the Western Massachusetts Public Interest Research 
Group (WMPIRG) , was presented to the Board for consideration. Th^ 
Board approved the affiliation and on advice from Counsel it acted 
to permit the collection of a fee from students to support WMPIRG 
on a voluntary basis, with a negative check-off procedure, simila: 
to the collection of the health insurance fee. Additionally, the 
University was to be reimbursed for any costs incurred in the col- 
lection of the fee. He said it was appropriate that the Board re- 
view and examine such activities periodically. The suggestion 
that MassPIRG be reviewed came several months ago and the Executive 
Committee, at its October meeting, recommended the review. 

The report at hand, he continued, dealt with four key 
questions - 

1. Are the activities of MassPIRG qualitatively or 
quantitatively different from those originally 
anticipated? 

2. Is MassPIRG providing an educational experience 
which can continue to be considered incidental to 
the educational purpose of the University? 

3. Have any new legal issues arisen since the 1972 
vote? 

4. Is the fee collecting mechanism still appropriate? 

He said the report, which Mrs. Simmons compiled, with help from 
the campuses and information from MassPIRG, revealed that Mass- 
PIRG's activities are essentially what they always have been, a 
combination of research and advocacy. In its pursuit of any one 
issue, MassPIRG's pattern of operation typically progressed from 
research to action and advocacy. Its method of advocacy generally 
involved public education and lobbying. MassPIRG's first action 
was to sponsor legislation regarding a particular utility company 
and legislative action continues to be part of MassPIRG's activi- 
ties . 

Mr. Lynton said that although detailed data on the num- 
ber of students actively participating in MassPIRG activities is 
not available, a reasonable number of students have been involved 
in MassPIRG and that involvement, on the whole, has been a posit it 
and educational one. In a few cases students have received aca- 
demic credit by working under the supervision of faculty members, 

He said that General Counsel of the University had re- 



I 



I 



I 



-2- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

cently reviewed the relationship of the University to MassPIRG 
and has advised that the legal situation has not changed. Because 
of a law passed in 1973, most members of the central staff of 
MassPIRG are registered lobbyists, an activity they carried on at 
the outset . 

Continuing his summary of the report's findings, Mr. 
Lynton said that in the opinion of those who examined a variety 
of fee collection methods, the present method of a negative check- 
off is preferred, because it insures the voluntary, non-coercive 
character of student support for the organization. Other methods 
all had drawbacks. University Counsel had advised that the Board 
was not authorized to impose a "mandatory" or "mandatory-refund- 
able" fee; experience has shown that the use of the "positive check- 
off" or "direct solicitation" systems forced organizations to de- 
vote much of their efforts to fund raising. 



Mr. Lynton concluded his report with the recommendation 
that the Committee recommend to the Board continuation of the 
present relationship and, by so doing, formalize the relationship 
with MassPIRG, formerly two entities known as Western Massachuset 
Public Interest Research Group (WMPIRG) and Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group East (MassPIRG East) at the time of the 
Board's previous actions in 1972 and 1973. 



In response to Mrs. Kaplan's question Mr. Morgan, Execu- 
tive Director of MassPIRG, said that, with the exception of a few 
law students, MassPIRG was almost exclusively an undergraduate 
organization, although the voluntary fee appeared on the bills of 
both undergraduate and graduate students. Noting the report's 
statement that MassPIRG requires at least fifty percent of the 
students to support its activities through voluntary payment of 
its fee, Chairman Shaler asked each campus to report its situatioji. 
Mr. Woodbury said 65 percent of the student body paid the MassPIRfc 
fee in the fall of 1972, subsequently 50 to 55 percent had done so 
Mr. Tubbs said about 55 percent of the UM/Boston student body paid 
the fee. Trustee Conti added that most of the students on the 
Boston campus she had talked with supported MassPIRG and wanted i 
to continue. A small minority of the students did not approve of 
it for one reason or another. 

President Wood stressed that periodic reviewing of on- 
going programs was an obligatory function of the Board and the 
present review was part of this process. He said that the timing 
of the review might have been affected by letters to him and to 
Trustees from parents of students and members of the Massachusetts 
Taxpayers Foundation. Many of the parents had stands on certain 
referenda on the November 1976 election ballot that were diametri- 
cally opposed to the stand of MassPIRG; and the parents, examining 
the tuition bills and seeing the fee supporting MassPIRG, took pen 
in hand. It was clear, he said, that MassPIRG will be a matter of 
continuing debate. 



"Sf 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



-3- 



"5144 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



Report on 

Tuition 

Waivers 

(Doc. T75-075B, 

Doc. T77-038) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Lynton said the basic issue is advocacy. MassPIRG 
is an advocacy group that takes positions on issues rather than 
personalities. It is legitimate to ask if the University can or 
should have any relationships with an organization that takes 
positions on issues and thereby takes a political stance. The 
Board addressed this question in 1972, and acted affirmatively. 
In reviewing MassPIRG' s current activities, it appears that the 
ratio of research and advocacy has not changed significantly and, 
on balance, its educational role and issue orientation makes con- 
tinuation at the University consistent with the Board's previous 
actions. 



I 



and 






There being no further discussion, it was moved, seconded 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees reaffirm 

its votes of May 26, 1972, and May 2, 1973 pertaining 
respectively, to the Western Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group (WMPIRG) and the Massachu- 
setts Public Interest Research Group East (MassPIRG 
East), which organizations are now merged and known 
as the Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group 
(MassPIRG): further, that the Amherst and Boston 
campuses be authorized to continue to collect volun- 
tary student fees of $2.00 per semester on the basis 
of a negative check-off procedure as heretofore used 
provided , that if in any semester less than fifty 
percent of the students at either campus elect to 
make such payments, such authorization will cease 
for that campus, and provided further , that MassPIRG 
shall reimburse the Commonwealth for any expenses 
incurred by the University in collecting such pay- 
ments . 



I 



Chairman Shaler noted with pride that for the first time 
a medical student was attending a Student Affairs Committee meet- 
ing and it gave him particular pleasure to welcome Mr. Topulos 
because he had been his former student at Williston Academy. Mr. 
Woodbury then asked if MassPIRG could function at the Medical 
School, to which Mr. Lynton replied that the option for students 
at UM/Worcester to affiliate with MassPIRG would depend on a stu- 
dent referendum and an enabling vote by the Board. 

The meeting then turned to the second item on the agenda, 
Report on Tuition Waivers (Doc. T77-038) . Mr. Lynton said the Report 
reflected the first full year of operation of the tuition waiver policy 
laid down by the Board in document T75-075B, which was approved in 
February, 1975. The policy tightened the criteria under which 
discretionary tuition waivers were to be applied. Between 1974-7 
and 1975-76 the dollar value of discretionary tuition waivers at 
UM/Amherst and UM/Boston was reduced from $2 million to $1.5 mil- 
lion, a reduction of 25 percent. Parenthetically he noted that 



-4- 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



statutory tuition waivers, which are not subject to Board control, 
declined about 15 percent. The abolition of the category, "Disser- 
tation and Thesis Credit," resulted in the largest reduction of 
waived tuition and had a significant effect on the total number of 
discretionary tuition waivers awarded in 1975-76. In the category, 
"Assistants and Associates," the more stringent eligibility criteria 
did not immediately have the effect of reducing the number and 
dollar amount of tuition waivers at UM/Amherst. Apparently, he 
said, departments realizing that a $l,800/year stipend was now 
necessary to insure a tuition waiver for their Graduate Assistant^/ 
Associates, maximized their ability to award such waivers by grant- 
ing fewer such stipends either above or below the $1,800 level than 
had been the practice in previous years. This resulted in a small- 
increase in the number and dollar amount of waivers in this cate- 
gory. In the spring of 1976, however, the more stringent eligi- 
bility criteria began to have the intended effect of reducing the 
dollar amount of waivers. 

In other areas of tuition waivers there had been little 
change except in the case of foreign students. The tuition waivejr 
policy does provide for waivers for foreign students at UM/Boston 
and UM/Amherst. Last year the Legislature passed a statute which 
required the University to charge undergraduate, out-of-state stu- 
dents at least 95 percent of instructional cost. This statute 
removed the University's right to waive tuition for all undergrad- 
uate out-of-state students, including foreign students, and has 
caused great hardships at both UM/Amherst and UM/Boston. UM/Bostbn 
was particularly hard hit, as its students are mainly undergraduates 

One of the votes before the meeting, Mr. Lynton continued 
was to bring policy into accord with the statute by amending the 
policy with regard to foreign students to benefit only graduate 
students. The other was to remove all inequity. The 50 percent 
floor on waivers does not take into account that the pay scales 
at the two campuses are not the same and pegs the scale to that 
of UM/Amherst, thus creating hardships at UM/Boston. 

The report on the general status of the first full year 
of operation of the revised tuition waiver policy prompted Chair- 
man Shaler to ask whether the removal of dormitory counselors from 
eligibility for tuition waivers had damaged the quality of dormitory 
life. There ensued a discussion of the burdens and responsibilities 
placed on dormitory counselors and the financial hardship placed on 
some by the loss of this benefit and the low salaries paid to thejn. 

Chairman Shaler concluded the discussion on the tuition 
waiver policy by urging that there be continuing review of the 
policy and its effect on different student constituencies and the 
quality of programs at the campuses. 

It was moved, seconded and 



-5- 



— ' t. 



5146 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



UM/Worcester — 
Report on Stu- 
dent Affairs 



VOTED 



and further 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Section 
2.2(b) of Trustee Document T75-075B, Tuition Waiver 
Policies be amended to read, 

"2.2(b) a minimum of one-half of the campus' 

full stipend." 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Section 
3.2 of Trustee Document T75-075B, Tuition Waiver 
Policies, be amended to read, 

"3.2 Foreign Students . A tuition waiver for 
foreign students is an appropriate method of 
encouraging and enabling foreign students to 
attend the University in order to encourage 
cross-cultural academic interchange. These 
tuition waivers are to be awarded on the basis 
of financial need and are authorized up to a 
maximum of ten percent of the total number of 
foreign graduate students attending the granting 
campus. " 



Chairman Shaler asked Mr. Fineblatt to report on studenp 
affairs at UM/Worcester . Mr. Fineblatt noted that this was the 
first report on student affairs at UM/Worcester to be made to the 
Committee. He said the Accreditation Committee in its recommenda- 
tions to the Medical School had pointed out several areas in stu- 
dent affairs where deficiencies existed. The first of these defi- 
ciencies to be remedied was the lack of a person responsible for 
student affairs; as of July 1, 1976 Mr. Fineblatt became that per- 
son as Associate Dean for Student Affairs. The Student Affairs 
staff consisted of the Associate Dean on a half-time basis and a 
full-time administrative secretary. Student Affairs' two main con- 
cerns are personal and vocational counseling. Vocational counseling 
includes directing students to residency programs; career advice 
concerning specializations; and choice of area of primary care. 
Mr. Southworth from the Amherst campus had been advising the school 
in establishing a student counseling service, and a career coun- 
seling service with representatives from the clinical departments 
was being set up. 

Mr. Fineblatt said the financial aid problems at Worcester 
stemmed from students who, because of their financial status, did 
not qualify for low interest federal loans. Attempts are being 
made to develop a "Worcester Health Program," with the help of lo :al 
banks. Each bank will be asked to provide ten to fifteen student 
loans. Housing, he continued, was an acute problem. The school 
has facilities for about fifty students. As the school now has 
305 students and will eventually have about 400 each year, there 
is a mad scramble for housing. Mr. Fineblatt said the Trustees 
had previously expressed interest in housing at UM/Worcester and 



-6- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



he hoped this interest would continue. 

Chairman Shaler asked if UM/Worcester owned any housing 
Mr. Fineblatt said that there were three sites at present. One, a 
former administrative building of the school, and two houses, with 
a total capacity of 35 students. Chairman Shaler noted that this 
at least set a precedent. 

Chairman Shaler asked if anything was being done about 
affirmative action and the future of the newly established Student 
Affairs Office. Mr. Fineblatt said a full-time affirmative action 
officer had been hired. The Student Affairs Office so far had be^n 
reacting to acute situations that had cropped up. He said they 
now have to begin planning an operation which would have programs 
in place before the onset of problems. 



a 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



UM/Amherst- 
Report on 
Student 



Mr. Woodbury at Chairman Shaler 's request spoke on stu- 
dent affairs at UM/Amherst. He passed out a chart showing the 
scope and area of the offices falling under the umbrella of the 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. He said that concerns of th^ Affairs 
operation fell into two kinds - persistent management problems 
and those in the speculative area. Persistent management problems 
included the cost and financing of the residence halls; difficulties 
in staffing in all areas; the Campus Center and the Garage; diffi- 
culties in terms of basic services, such as financial aid and coun- 
seling. The speculative area consisted of challenges not unique 
to UM/Amherst - the job market and the persistence of unemploymen 
of young people; demographic projections; and questions about who 
are college bound students. He noted that UM/Amherst was now having 
to cope with non- traditional students and this raised special coum- 
seling problems and resulted in the need for day care centers and 
housing. 

President Wood felt there was a natural bridge between 
the Alumni and employment. Also, he said the Alumni were ready t<b 
help and should be used. Mr. Woodbury said efforts were being mad 
in this area. Alumni in New York City and Washington, D. C, had 
been helpful in finding jobs and internships in private industry and 
government in both cities. He noted there were 40,000 alumni in 
Massachusetts and 60,000 in New England, and present efforts to u|e 
them would be increased. 



The meeting then turned to student affairs at UM/Boston 



, UM/Boston — 



Chancellor Golino said three committees at UM/Boston had been work-Report on 
ing on the problems of student affairs at UM/Boston and the Trus- Student 
tees would soon be made fully aware of the considerable activity Affairs 
in this area by a forthcoming report. He felt that UM/Boston 
considering the problems it faced and its efforts to solve these 
problems, might well be the model for urban universities of the 
future. He asked Mr. James to describe the work of his committee 
Mr. James said his committee was concerned with the totality of stu- 
dent services. He distributed a chart showing the many ways students 



-7- 



"5148 



Student Affairs 
11/22/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

entered the UM/Boston system or got onto the college-bound track. 
Included were: 1) Another Course to College (ACC), under which 
the Institute for Learning and Teaching selects 100 people and 
prepares them for college. While ACC is supported by the UM/Bost0n 
campus, the preparation is not solely geared to entering UM/Boston; 
students can go on to other colleges ; and 2) Higher Education Prep- 
aration in Prison (HEPP) , in which program incarcerated individuals 
can begin studying for college. In addition to identifying the 
many areas of activity, the committee had also found areas that 
need strengthening; for example, career placement, psychological 
counseling, and child care. In the case of child care it will be 
necessary to stabilize funding. At present, funds come from four 
sources and there is a structured deficit of $15,000 per year caused 
by a sliding fee scale. Chancellor Golino noted that there were 
up to seven possible ways a student could enter UM/Boston. 

Trustee Conti asked about the veterans program. Chan- 
cellor Golino said that no efforts were being made at present due 
to lack of funding. Unless a grant is forthcoming the situation 
will remain as it is. He also said that articles appearing in thJB 
Mass Media indicated student perception of increased support for 
student services and of a functioning counseling operation. Chair- 
man Shaler noted that the Chancellor seemed more optimistic. Chan- 
cellor Golino agreed that this was so. The Committee had found a 
measure of activity that was high where seen in the light of the 
resources available. 



There being no farther business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. 



I 



I 




Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-8- 



I 



ATTENDANCE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE 

November 30, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff: Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 



Trustees Croce, Dennis, Gordon, Rowland, Troy; Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Absent Committee Member: Trustee Shearer 



Other Trustees: Trustee Cronin 



Office of the President: Vice President Janis ; Vice President 



Lynton; Ms. Hanson, Director, Office of the Budget and Assistant 
Vice President; Mr. O'Leary, Associate Counsel for the University; 
Miss Taylor, Assistant to the Director, Budget Office 

UM/ Amherst ; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 



UM/Boston : Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and Control 



UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Dr. Caper, Vice Chancellor for 
Health Affairs; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Mr. Ference, Group Practice Administrator; Mr. Turek, 
Budget Analyst 

Guests: Mr. Arthur Parker and Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer anc 



*-/ f 



5143 



Wood, Investment Counselors; Mrs. Shukri of the Executive Office 
of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 2:10 p.m. by Chairman 
Carlson, who called first for the Report of Investment Counsel . 
Mr. John Wood introduced Mr. Arthur Parker, who reported for Stan-] 
dish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Counsel. Mr. Parker briefed the Con- 
mittee on the current status of the stocks and bonds in the endow- 
ment portfolio. He said that the recommendation contained in the 
Portfolio Analysis of October 1, 1976 had been amended and copies 
of the amended recommendation were circulated to the Committee. 

After Mr. Parker's report, he and Mr. Wood answered spe- 
cific questions from members of the Committee. Mr. Carlson then 
thanked them for their report and Messrs . Parker and Wood withdrew 
from the meeting. (See addendum on pages 7 and 8.) 

At the request of the Chairman, President Wood spoke 
briefly on the status of the FY 1978 Maintenance Budget Request . 
He said that the budget request will be affected by the recent 
agreement between the Alliance and the Commonwealth. The budget 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



Status of FY 
1978 Main- 
tenance Budget 
Request 



-5150 



B&F Comm. 
11/30/76 



UM/Worcester — 
Group Practice 
FY 77 Expendi- 
ture Plan and 
FY 78 Revenue 
Projections 
(Doc. T77-050) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

request did not allow for salary adjustments, and it will be nec- 
essary to review the request if University salaries are to be kept 
in line with salaries of other state employees. Also, he said, 
the upcoming collective bargaining elections may further impact 
on the budget request; therefore, it may be necessary for the Com- 
mittee to take another look at the budget request at some future 
date . 

Chairman Carlson turned next to the matter of the Group 
Practice Expenditure Plan FY 1977 and Group Practice Revenue Pro- 
jections FY 1978— UM/Worcester (Doc. T77-050) . This was a rather 
complex subject, he said, and he asked Chancellor Bulger to begin 
the discussion. Chancellor Bulger said he would defer to Daniel 
Ference, Group Practice Administrator, who had developed the sta- 
tistical report. Mr. Ference said there would be a cash shortfal 
at the end of June, which the Medical Center anticipates meeting 
either through a short-term commercial loan or by the deferment 
of compensation to physicians, repayment to be made from FY 1978 
clinical revenues. 

At Chairman Carlson's request, Mr. Ference explained 
the three components of the income of physicians who participate 
in the Group Practice Plan: The first component, he said, is the 
state base portion; the second is the guaranteed income from the 
Group Practice Plan. These two portions are determined by negoti 
ation. The third component is an incentive overage amount from 
clinical revenues. 

Chairman Carlson informed the Committee that through FY 
1976 up to and including October of FY 1977 there had been a cumu- 
lative shortfall of some $270,000, which explains the anticipated 
need to borrow money or defer compensation. In March, when the 
projected shortfall can be more accurately predicted, a determina 
tion will have to be made as to just how it will be covered. 

Mr. Ference added that the projected write-offs at Pond- 
ville Hospital shown in Table II were the result of regulations 
for third party reimbursement which the University must adhere to 
in its first year of operation. As the tables were reviewed and 
specific questions answered, it was noted that additional billing 
personnel would be necessary in order to fulfill this function as 
additional clinical staff were hired until such time as the bill- 
ing could be computerized. 

Chairman Carlson asked the status of the intra-Universitjy 
loan to the Group Practice Plan. Mr. Janis replied that the loan 
of up to $250,000 which had been approved by the Trustees in 
June covered a period of two years. He said that Table V assumed 
forgiveness of this loan for one year, which would require the 
approval of the Trustees at the appropriate time. 

Chairman Carlson introduced the next agenda item, the 



I 



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-2- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University Teaching Hospital Rate Increases — UM/Worcester (Doc. 
T77-037) , asking Dr. Caper to explain the need for the increases 
Dr. Caper said that the increases being requested were as follows 






3-LufJL 



Acute semi-private rooms 
Acute private rooms 
Intensive care 
Ancillary charges 



from $125 to $155 daily 
from $150 to $185 daily 
from $315 to $440 daily 
a 30% across the board increase 



B&F Comm. 
11/30/76 

UM/ Worcester — 
University 
Teaching 
Hospital Rate 
Increases 
(Doc. T77-037) 



These proposed increases, he said, would bring the University 
Hospital rates in line with rates of other teaching hospitals in 
the Boston area. He said the direct impact on patients would be 
negligible since nearly all the patients are covered by third- 
party payers. The proposed increases would increase projected 
revenues at the hospital by about $615,000 in FY 1977 and by $1. 8?5 
million in FY 1978. He said that this proposal was approved by 
the Hospital Management Board and that these increases reflect 
not so much an increase in the cost of patient care as a reallo- 
cation of expenses among reimbursement sources. 

Trustee Croce, at the request of Chairman Carlson, in- 
formed the Committee that when this matter had been discussed at 
the meeting of the Committee on Health Affairs, Mrs. Bluestone, 
representing Commissioner Fielding, expressed her belief that a 
rate increase would be received with displeasure since public 
attention had been drawn to the increasing cost of health care. 
Dr. Caper said the charges, even if increased, would still be 
below the actual cost of services rendered. He said that the 
cost of health care at the University Hospital should be compara- 
ble to national norms and that this should be the governing factot, 
not the cost of the service. He said that the University Hospitajl 
is still carrying a large overhead and would probably not reach 
a break-even level for at least five years; since the Hospital is 
subsidized by the state, the Hospital rates, he said, are not 
really related to the cost of health care and had been set arbi- 
trarily. In addition, he said, the University is providing a 
level of service that has not been available previously in the 
Worcester area. It was noted that the proposed rate increase 
would have to be approved by the Rate Setting Commission of the 
Commonwealth. Chancellor Bulger said that even if the Hospital 
was at its full complement of 400 beds, the increased rates would 
not cover the actual cost. 

Discussion of this item was then concluded and on motiofr 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the need for rate increases for the University of 
Massachusetts Teaching Hospital as outlined in 
Document T77-037 and to request that the Rate Set- 
ting Commission approve said increases. 



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Establishment 
of W. Roy 
Elliot Endow- 
ment Fund 
(Doc. T77-035) 



Lotta Crabtree 

Endowment 
Fund 



Listing of 
Ohio Land 
for Sale 
(Doc. T77-045) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next matter for consideration, said Chairman Carl- 
son, was the proposed establishment of the W. Roy Elliot Endow- 
ment Fund (Doc. T77-035). Treasurer Johnson explained that this 
endowment to the University came as a result of the interest of 
an older (nontraditional) student in the forestry program. After 
his retirement from business, Mr. Elliot had taken some graduate 
courses in Forestry at the University and had later left money to 
the University for an annual award to a resident registered in 
the Forestry Department. On motion made and seconded, it was theh. 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the W. 
Roy Elliot Memorial Fund be established as an 
Endowment Fund for the purpose of making an annual 
award of $300.00 from income earned during the pre- 
ceding fiscal year to a Massachusetts resident reg- 
istered in the Forestry Department as a full-time 
student at the University of Massachusetts - Amherst 
Campus; to be eligible a student must be in good 
academic standing, demonstrate financial need and 
be of good character. The recipient shall be se- 
lected by a committee consisting of faculty from 
the Forestry Department who will review applications 
filed prior to June 1 each year. Excess income re- 
maining after annual awards have been made shall be 
returned to the principal of the fund on the last 
day of the fiscal year. 

Trustee Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson what activity 
was presently underway related to the Lotta Crabtree endowment 
fund. Treasurer Johnson replied that the University received 
each year the amount of $100,000 for scholarships to be divided 
among the campuses. Trustee Gordon asked if the administration 
would look into the possibility of obtaining more money from this 
fund. 

Chairman Carlson then asked Treasurer Johnson to intro- 
duce the next item of agenda, the Listing of the Ohio Land for 
Sale (Doc. T77-045) . Mr. Johnson said that the firm which had 
been selected to appraise the land last year had asked for permis 
sion to list it at the highest appraised value ($1,015,000). Dis 
cussion ensued with regard to the timing of this matter. It was 
the conclusion that the private housing market was on an upsurge 
and that it would be an appropriate time to list the land. On 
motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
enter into a listing agreement with the firm of 
Donald G. Culp, Realtor, of Columbus, Ohio, to 
offer for sale the property described in Trustee 
Document T7 7-045; provided, however, that the 
terms of any sale agreement shall be subject to 



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[ 



* - ' fr* 



5153 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

approval by the Treasurer, the President and 
the Board of Trustees. 

The next item of agenda, the State Auditor's Repo rts, 
was introduced by Mr. Janis at the request of Chairman Carlson. 
Mr. Janis said that these reports had been mailed to the Trustees 
directly by the State Auditor's Office. He described the proce- 
dure of review and response. The Management Bureau of the Com- 
mission on Administration and Finance, he said, reviews the audits 
and sends the University a list of questions to which they would 
like answers by a given date. The campuses are in the process 
of responding to the questions and Mr. Janis said that these re- 
sponses would be shared with the Committee at a later date. 

The Committee on Budget and Finance concluded this 
portion of its agenda at 3:30 p.m., at which time it recessed 
until 3:55 p.m., when it convened to meet jointly with the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds, to discuss the last agenda item, 
the Capital Outlay Request for FY 1978 (Doc. T77-048) . 

Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on Budget 
and Finance, yielded the chair to Trustee Spiller, Chairman of 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Chairman Spiller said 
that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds had just completed 
an examination of the proposed Five Year Capital Outlay Budget 
(Doc. T77-048) . The budget, if approved, is to be submitted to 
the State with the understanding that only the first year (FY 
1978) of the request is "locked up." The requests for the subse- 
quent four years will be subject to review and alteration on a 
year by year basis. He noted that part of the Capital Outlay 
Budget review process had been occurring over the last 90 days 
and in the course of meetings held by the President's Office with 
each of the three campuses, "bare bone" campus requests totalling 
$114 million had been reduced to $70.6 million. 



Chairman Spiller then said that the document at hand 
listed capital outlay requests for the fiscal years 1978-1982. 
At the Buildings and Grounds meeting, campus representatives had 
discussed each item. Chairman Spiller said he would review, for 
the benefit of the members of the Committee on Budget and Finance 
the major requests from each campus in the context of the five 
year capital outlay. He then proceeded to summarize the major 
items in each of the campuses' five year plans (totalling $70.6 
million) and the specific items and amounts requested for FY 1978 
by each campus (totalling $12,425 million) as contained in Doc. 
T77-048. 

As there were no questions following his review of the 
Amherst request, Chairman Spiller went on with his review of the 
Boston request. Following his summary, he noted that concern 
had been expressed at the meeting of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds over the impact of the sum of $29 million for Buildin 



-5- 



B&F Comm, 
11/30/76 



State Auditor's 
Reports FY 75 



Capital Outlay 
Request for 
FY 1978 
(Doc. T77-048) 



~5154 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

080/2 (arts and science building) and there had been discussion 
of formatting the request so that it would be apparent that the 
entire amount was not to be expended in one year. Trustee Carlson 
said doing this could result in getting an appropriation for "one 
half a horse," and never getting approval for the other half; he 
said that laying out an expenditure schedule, if carefully done, 
would probably lessen the impact without endangering completion 
of the project. 

Trustee Dennis asked if funds for library acquisitions 
were to be included in capital outlay or in the operating budget. 
President Wood said the question of which was the better strategy 
was still unanswered. Amherst and Boston had each received "one 
time" capital outlay appropriations some years ago but recent re- 
quests for books in capital outlay budgets had been either deleter 
by the Governor or disapproved by the Legislature. Consideration 
has been given, he said, to making a separate justification for 
library needs and including requests for these needs in both the 
capital outlay and operating budget requests. Trustee Dennis 
said he would welcome such an action. On a recent visit to the 
Boston campus he had found that the one thing faculty and students 
agreed on was the need for books for the library. Chancellor 
Bromery said that library acquisitions were more useful if allo- 
cated on a yearly basis rather than in large sums appropriated 
sporadically. He said that at the recent budget hearing held by 
Secretary Parks on the Amherst FY 1978 Maintenance Budget request 
there were a number of questions about the level of library acqui- 
sitions but past experience would caution that this apparent inter 
est in library books does not necessarily mean funds would be 
forthcoming. 



Following the Chairman's summary of the Worcester re- 
quest, Trustee Carlson asked if the FY 1978 $3 million request 
for hospital furnishings and equipment was a step towards the 
Hospital's being fully equipped and up to full bed capacity well 
before 1981. Chancellor Bulger said that 1981 was a more realis- 
tic figure for the Hospital's reaching its design capacity. The 
requests are for equipment and expansion of services for existing 
beds and the total five-year request is consistent with the orig- 
inal plans for the Hospital. 

Trustee Gordon asked if the items listed in, for exam- 
ple, the Amherst budget were in order of priority. Mrs. Robinson 
said they were. Trustee Cronin asked why the renovation of aca- 
demic buildings was given second priority, while the renovation 
of residence halls was given third priority. Mrs. Robinson said 
two considerations were involved, the academic buildings are old- 
er than the residence halls and in greater need of repair, and 
consideration was given to the question of state investment and 
interest in the renovation and maintenance of residence halls, 
since these older dormitories are now the property of the Common- 
wealth with the maturation of the bonds. The latter she said was 
an untested issue. Trustee Gordon said he felt it was time to 
test it. Chancellor Bromery said the priority assigned to the 
residence halls was part of the testing. It is very difficult, 
he said, to predict where the Governor or the Legislature will 



-6- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

draw the line in considering a list of capital outlay request 
items , but because there was a great deal of pressure to renovate 
the residences, it was felt that there might be a chance that both 
the second item, academic buildings, and the third, residence 
halls, might be approved. Further, there could conceivably be 
alternative funds for renovating the residence halls; there were 
none for academic buildings. 

Chairman Spiller said the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds had also discussed the problems centered on the Southwest 
Towers and intended to ask Chancellor Bromery to provide a report 
complete with recommendations. Chancellor Bromery said such a 
report was in preparation, the necessary study having been started 
some six months earlier. The report would include recommendations 
for the Towers as well as a long-range plan for the entire resi- 
dence hall system. 

There being no further discussion, the two Committees 
meeting in joint session moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

approve the FY 1978 Capital Outlay Budget Request 
in the context of the five-year Capital Outlay 
Budget as set forth in Trustee Document T77-048; 
further, that at the appropriate time the capital 
outlay budget request for each subsequent year with- 
in said five-year budget plan shall be subject to 
review and approval of the Board of Trustees. 

President Wood said he wished to thank the Committees 
for their considered review and approval of the request and wanted 
to thank Chairman Spiller and the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds for goading the University into developing a rational 
capital outlay process, particularly the five-year concept. He 
said that each year an additional year's request would be added 
to the process, so that the University would always have capital 
outlay plans dealing with a period of five years. He cautioned 
that even though the maintenance budget was reasonable in terms 
of order of magnitude, and the capital outlay budget was a sensible 
one, there would be "heavy water" ahead, with people accusing the 
University of making unreasonable demands. He did not think this 
was true and was prepared to defend the budget since it was a 
realistic estimate of the obligations and commitments the Common- 
wealth had undertaken over the last fifteen years. He reiterate 
his gratitude to the Committees. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tees, and the meeting was adjourned at 4.30 p.m. 

ADDENDUM 

A formal vote was not taken at the November 30, 1976, 



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"5156 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



meeting of the Committee on Budget and Finance with regard to the 
recommended change in the investment portfolio. However, a major 
ity of the members present at that meeting were polled by tele- 
phone on December 3, and voted as follows: 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to effectuate the stock 
transaction recommended by Standish, Ayer and 
Wood, Investment Counsel to the University of 
Massachusetts, at the meeting of the Committee 
on Budget and Finance on November 30, 1976, 
and as outlined in Trustee Document T77-052. 

Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 




I 



i 



• 



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ATTENDANCE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 30, 1976; 2:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

Twelfth Floor Conference Room 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Spiller; President Wood; 
Trustees Burack, Clark; Mr. Colby representing Trustee Winthrop; 
Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Abrams , Dennis, Eddy and 
Shearer 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 
ning; Mr. Brigham, Senior University Planner; Ms. Hanson, Directo 
Office of the Budget and Assistant Vice President 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Planning Director 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger, Mr. Turek, Budget Analyst 



The meeting was called to order at 2:15 p.m. It was 
agreed to deal with the second item of business, Requests for 
Naming of Facilities , first. Chairman Spiller noted that during 
his tenure as a Trustee the naming of buildings had been a topic 
of on-going and varied discussion. Occasionally, he said, a sug- 
gested name triggered an immediate positive response because it 
seemed apt to everyone involved. He felt this was a better way t^> 
approach the problem than to go through the campus and name every 
unnamed building. 



3157 



Mrs. Robinson said she felt the situation at UM/Boston 
was reaching the point of considerable confusion because of the 
consolidation of the Colleges and the awkward numbering of some 
buildings. Chairman Spiller said these were needed for general 
purposes of identification. Chancellor Golino admitted that 
"Administration Building," "Science Building," and "Building One, 
weren't inspirational, but he felt nothing should be done until 
the consolidation of the Colleges had been accomplished. He noted 
that suggestions had been received from people with very extreme 
ideological views, and from those with a deep sense of the history 
of New England, and of Boston in particular. He stressed that it 
should be made clear that buildings were named by the Trustees 
operating within Trustee imposed guidelines. 

Chairman Spiller asked if temporary names rather than 
numbers would be worthwhile, if only for ease of management. He 
said if names other than the names of persons were used they coulti 



Requests for 
Naming of 
Facilities 



"5158 



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11/30/76 



Five-Year 
Capital 
Outlay Budget 
(Doc. T77-048) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

easily be changed at the proper time. Chancellor Golino felt the 
present system was adequate because there were only four buildings 
to be named and this could be resolved within the year. Trustee 
Burack said that a recent book about the pumphouse at Columbia 
Point contained many references that could provide appropriate 
names . 

Chairman Spiller said that two suggestions for naming 
parts of university buildings had been received and asked for dis- 
cussion on the suggestions. After considerable discussion it was 
decided that more information was needed about both suggestions 
before deciding. Mrs. Robinson was asked to provide the informa- 
tion on one of the individuals and Secretary Hardy would be asked 
to provide information on the other. 

The meeting then turned to the other item of business, 
Five-Year Capital Outlay Budget (Doc. T77-048) . President Wood 
spoke first, he reminded the Committee that at the last meeting 
he had reported the submission of a preliminary FY 1978 capital 
outlay request to the Executive Office of Administration and Fi- 
nance. This request had been put in the context of a five-year 
capital outlay projection. Because of the time limits imposed by 
A. and F. , the request and the projection had been submitted with 
the understanding that both were subject to review. Since that 
time, he said, the review had been completed. Meetings had been 
held with all three campuses to determine priorities and needs, 
and the five-year projection had been reduced from $114 million 
to approximately $70.6 million. President Wood said he felt the 
dollar amount projections, because of their inherent impreciseness 
were not the most important result of the review. The University 
had been aware of what was needed to renovate and remodel parts 
of the Amherst campus, and to complete certain developments at 
Boston and Worcester. This, along with the development of more 
effective and meaningful standards of utilization and economy of 
use of the physical plant, were the important points of the review, 
he said. 

Chairman Spiller said it was important that the Commit- 
tee understand the objectives of the meeting, firstly to recommend 
a five-year capital outlay projection, the items and amounts of 
which would be subject to annual review and revision; secondly, to 
recommend a specific FY 1978 capital outlay request. Mrs. Robinson 
noted that the proposed vote had been construed accordingly; that; 
the committee was being asked to approve a one-year specific re- 
quest in the content of a five-year projection, with the under- 
standing that the Trustees will, in each subsequent year, have an 
opportunity to review and decide on the submissions for each fiscal 
year. The vote did not ask the Trustees to approve dollar amounts 
three or four years in advance. She said her office and the Cam- 
pus Planning Offices had found viewing the capital outlay requests 
in this context a most useful way to review long-range issues. 

Trustee Burack asked why there was no money in the ca'pi-- 



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*-» f— 



5159 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tal outlay request for the purpose of buying library books. Mrs. 
Robinson explained that although in the past book funds had been 
requested in both the operating and capital outlay budgets, this 
year it had been decided to include these only in the operating 
budget request. Ms. Hanson said there had been problems in the 
past in requesting capital outlay funds for library books. One 
year the item got only partial legislative approval, in another 
year the executive branch cut the item out of the budget. The cam- 
puses accepted the approach of smaller yearly requests for library 
acquisitions in the operating budget, rather than larger amounts 
in the capital outlay request. 

If the University could get clear guidelines from State 
officials that they would prefer to find the item in the capital 
outlay budget, Ms. Hanson continued, the University would be happy 
to oblige. Trustee Burack said a survey should be made to deter- 
mine how close all the libraries come to the standards set by the 
American Library Association. She said there was need for a larg^ 
sum, spread over five years if necessary, and this was worth fight- 
ing for. The University could not operate without it. Ms. Hanson 
added that, in addition to seeking funds by any appropriate means, 
the University libraries were attempting to broaden their resources 
by cooperating with other libraries. 

Chairman Spiller asked for discussion of the UM/Amherst 
FY 1978 request and five-year capital outlay budget. Mr. Little- 
field said the UM/Amherst Capital Outlay Program, FY 1978-1982, w^s 
an attempt to indicate that renovation, remodelling, and campus 
maintenance were on-going activities that had an on-going need foijr 
funds. He pointed out that if renovation and remodelling of the 
Amherst campus took place at the rate suggested in the capital 
outlay program, that is, at a yearly rate of about one percent of 
the total academic square footage, completion of the process woul<jl 
take 100 years. Some of the buildings to be renovated had been 
built in the late nineteenth century, others in the early to midd^ 
twentieth century. He said it was time to bring them up to current- 
ly acceptable standards in terms of facilities for the handicapped, 
plumbing, mechanical and safety codes. Also, he said, in remodel- 
ling a building, attempts were made to bring the interior of the 
building into conformity with the academic programs of the occupants 
of the building. 

The Capital Outlay Program, Mr. Littlefield continued, 
attempts to establish a cycle, so that in any one year UM/Amherst 
would only be seeking funds for building renovation and one of th£ 
following: campus improvement, utilities, or equipment. This cy- 
cle would enable UM/Amherst to have only two priorities instead oi 
four or five as in previous years. He noted that equipment did n<|>t 
last as long as buildings and a depreciation rationale was being 
used to justify the expenditure of at least $2 million every thre( 
years to purchase equipment and keep laboratories up-to-date. In! 
response to Chairman Spiller' s question, Mr. Littlefield said UM/ 



B&G Comm. 
11/30/76 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst had last received funds for renovations in 1964. However, 
he said it was important to realize that, in the period 1964-1972 
the Commonwealth had appropriated some $10 to $15 million a year 
for major new buildings. 

Chairman Spiller asked if the $1.5 million requested 
for FY 1978 was to correct problems of the Tillson Power Plant. 
Mr. Littlefield said the money to correct defects in the steam 
lines was in the FY 1977 appropriation. He noted that the FY 1978 
and FY 1980 requests reflected the need for ongoing renovations o:: 
the utility system. He said an infra-red scan of the steam lines 
had shown large heat losses and one of the items included in the 
FY 1978 request was to pay for a probe of the steam lines to verify 
the conditions indicated by the infra-red scan. Goodell and the 
Graduate Research Center appear to be in serious trouble and should 
be repaired immediately. 

Trustee Burack asked if the requests were realistic in 
terms of probable support from State officials. President Wood 
said the support was there, but that complications might develop 
due to the state of the bond market. Chairman Spiller said he 
did not think the bond market problems faced by the State in the 
recent past would recur. Mr. Littlefield said the cigarette tax 
revenues had bearing on the matter. Since a certain portion of 
the tax was dedicated to paying off capital outlay debt, it re- 
lated directly to the State's borrowing capability. 

Chairman Spiller asked for discussion on the renovation 
and remodelling of the residence halls. Mr. Littlefield said the 
residence halls were supposed to be self-sustaining; that is, ren 
al income was to cover the costs of maintenance, debt services 
and renovations. Because of inflation the rental income was barely 
sufficient to cover the costs of maintenance and debt services, 
and funds for renovating the buildings to meet the code on acces- 
sibility for the handicapped would have to be found elsewhere. 
The Capital Outlay Program sought to have the State consider fund- 
ing the handicapped requirements and the renovation of at least 
some of the dormitories now owned by the State. 

President Wood said that the Southwest Towers were cen- 
tral to the problems of the residence halls. Unless a new image 
could be created for the Towers he feared the Towers would have 
the image of high rise, public housing and this was a matter of 
real concern. He noted that Channel 57 had produced a documentary 
about the Towers. The documentary's inaccuracies did not detract 
from its devastating impact. He stressed the importance of some 
action being taken. Chairman Spiller suggested that the Commit- 
tee ask Chancellor Bromery for a report and recommendations on 
the Towers, the report to go into specifics of such matters as 
population density and bond issues. 

Trustee Burack asked if the students participated in 



-4- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

efforts to keep the Towers from further deterioration. Mr. Lit- 
tlefield reluctantly agreed to speak to the issue. He said he 
was not with UM/Amherst when the dorms were planned but he felt 
he knew what had happened. In the early sixties, when enrollment 
was expanding at a rate of 1,500 students per year, there was 
tremendous overcrowding in existing residences. The University 
went to the Bureau of Building Construction and, in effect, asked 
that new dormitories be built as quickly and as cheaply as possi- 
ble, and specified that they be built close to the campus. The 
BBC complied with the University's request and designed residences 
with a population density which, in order to be habitable, required 
a disciplined life style. The result was that the University now 
has residences that do not meet current life styles and are en- 
cumbered with thirty-year debts which require maximum occupancy 
to service. He said that solving the density problem would creatfe 
problems of subsidy. Trustee Burack asked if it would be possible 
to pay off the debts and alter the buildings to conform to currenjt 
life styles. Chairman Spiller said the solution would be to re- 
tire the debt through capital outlays, but the Commonwealth had 
only rarely financed dormitory construction. He said the problems 
could not be resolved at this meeting and asked Mr. Littlefield 
to continue the discussion on the Capital Outlay Program. 

During a period of rapid expansion in the midst of infla- 
tion, Mr. Littlefield said, the first budgetary casualty was 
landscaping, and the second equipment. UM/Amherst now hoped to 
remedy these. An internal group made up of Planning Office and 
Physical Plant staff, and Landscape Architecture faculty and 
graduate students, is working on an analysis and inventory of the 
campus. The group will identify the areas most in need of improve- 
ment and these areas will be given priority. Trustee Burack laud- 
ed this use of internal staff rather than hiring outside consult- 
ants. 



The meeting then turned to the Capital Outlay Program 
of UM/ Bos ton. Chairman Spiller noted that the first item for 
FY 1978 was for the seawater cooling system. Basically, he said, 
the problem was one created by the BBC. Chancellor Golino agreed 
but said the problem would not be solved unless it was funded in 
the University's capital outlay budget. Mr. Meehan said that UM/ 
Boston had received the results of a preliminary study of the sea 
water cooling system made by consultants. The study made recom- 
mendations for renovations which will cost about $2 million. He 
said that efforts were being made to schedule the repairs so that 
the job would be completed in the spring of 1978 and that the 
system could last through one more summer by replacing pumps and 
sections of pipe as necessary. Chancellor Golino said he was 
relying on the judgment of people who said it would last one more 
year. Costs of replacing pumps and sections of pipe were taken 
from the operating budget. Trustee Clark asked what the costs 
had been to date. Mr. Meehan said about $110,000 had been spent 
in FY 1977. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the matter of space adaptations, Mr. Meehan said the 
science library was being shifted to the main library in order to 
convert some 18,000 square feet of space into classrooms seating 
from 90 to 100 students. He said that the revised building pro- 
gram at the Harbor campus had necessitated a complete rescheduling 
of classroom seating. President Wood said $100 million had been 
cut from the original master plan. Mr. Meehan said the facilities 
available were being used very intensively and that other spaces 
were also scheduled for conversion to classrooms and offices. 
Trustee Burack asked if consideration had been given to making 
the classrooms flexible in terms of seating capacity by means of 
folding walls. Mr. Meehan said this was being done. 

In response to Chairman Spiller's question, Mr. Meehan 
said the $300,000 request for the bus terminal would enable UM/ 
Boston to acquire the land, at a probable cost of $100,000, to 
build an enclosed waiting platform and stairway, and to resurface 
the paved area. Trustee Clark asked why the MBTA was not provid- 
ing these facilities. Mr. Meehan said the MBTA's position was 
that they would provide the facilities only if they serviced the 
terminal. Chancellor Golino said that if UM/Boston had waited 
for the MBTA to provide bus service, students would still be walk- 
ing to the campus. President Wood said he felt he knew his way 
through the MBTA bureaucracy and his six-month effort had been to 
no avail. Mrs. Robinson said such attempts would continue, in- 
cluding one to have the MBTA make Columbia Point a stop on the 
Quincy line. If this happened then the MBTA probably would as- 
sume the cost of building the bus terminal. Trustee Clark asked 
if this meant the University's investment would go "down the 
tube." Mr. Meehan said no firm decision would be made until late 
in 1977, at which time the MBTA's intentions should be clear. 



The meeting turned its attention to the request for 
equipment. Mr. Meehan said that about $1 million earmarked for 
equipment and furniture in the original Phase I allotment had 
been diverted to other purposes, mainly building change-orders. 
The campus was now seeking catch-up funds and had a revised list 
of priorities. Trustee Burack asked what would happen if the 
State authorities asked for a list of items absolutely necessary 
to the functioning of the University. Chairman Spiller said he 
assumed the President's Office and the campuses would have to 
respond. President Wood said that if he were asked, his prioritiie 
would be, 1) keeping things operative; 2) renewal and renovation; 
3) new things. 



Chairman Spiller asked for discussion of the proposed 
$1.2 million to renovate 100 Arlington Street. Mrs. Robinson 
said that while this was a matter of less urgency than some other 
it was something that should be done. The general plan was to 
renovate about half the building at a modest rate of $20 per 
square foot. If the recommendation is approved more detailed 
plans will be worked out, she said. 



-6- 



P 



k 



k 



"5163 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Spiller asked Mr. Meehan to discuss the construction 
funds of $29 million for Building 080/2. Mr. Meehan said the pro- 
posal represented a substantial cutback from the original Phase I.'. 
program which involved two buildings, each to cost $30 million in 
1973 dollars. The proposal, he said, involved a re-programming, 
in which a proposed science building will be an arts and science 
building. Chairman Spiller asked how many additional students 
could be accommodated in the proposed building. Mr. Meehan said 
it would enable College IV to build up to a level of 1,500 studenis , 
an increase of approximately 1,000. Chancellor Golino said the 
Harbor Campus currently had 7,000 FTE students; by the time of thi 
proposed building's completion in 1934 or 1985 the enrollment should 
be 9,000. He noted this was within the Trustees' enrollment guide- 
lines. Mrs. Robinson said the building would complete the campus 
and efficiently carry enrollments to the 1982 level. Trustee 
Burack said the requested amount ($29 million) was so large that 
it seemed too vulnerable. She asked if it could be "staged out," 
so that it would not appear that the entire amount was to be spen : 
in one year. Mrs. Robinson said that construction funds were usu- 
ally voted in a single bloc, although not spent that way. She said 
that a time line of expenditure to 1982 could be appended to the 
request . 

There being no further discussion of UM/Boston's Capital- 
Outlay Program the meeting turned to that of UM/Worcester. Chan- 
cellor Bulger said the $3 million requested for furnishings and 
equipment had been part of the original projections for the Teach- 
ing Hospital. He said that the material was needed to provide nec- 
essary services to already funded beds, increased ambulatory care 
and emergency visits, and increased medical student classes. Mrs 
Robinson said that a review of previous requests had shown that 
the request is devoted to the expansion of medical services for 
the existing bed count. She said the request for $3 million did 
not relate to opening new floors. President Wood said the $3 mil- 
lion was for new medical technology. Chancellor Bulger said ap- 
proval of the request would allow services not now in place to 
begin; for example, urology and neurology. Mrs. Robinson said 
when the Hospital was constructed it was understood that there 
would be additonal investment in equipment, at an expected cost 
of $16 million, expended over a number of years. She said the re- 
quests in UM/Worcester ' s Capital Outlay Program were within that 
expectation. 

At 3:50 p.m., there being no further discussion, it was 
agreed to recess and reconvene in joint session with the Committe 
on Budget and Finance in order to act on the Five Year Capital Ou 
Lay Budget. 

Trustee Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on Budget an 1 
Finance, yielded the chair to Trustee Spiller, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds. Chairman Spiller said that the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds had just completed an examina- 
tion of the proposed Five Year Capital Outlay Budget (Doc. T77-048) . 



B&G Comm. 
11/30/76 



-7- 



5164 



B&G Comm. 
11/30/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The budget, if approved, is to be submitted to the State with the 
understanding that only the first year (FY 1978) of the request 
is "locked up." The requests for the subsequent four years will 
be subject to review and alteration on a year by year basis. He 
noted that part of the Capital Outlay Budget review process had 
been occurring over the last 90 days and in the course of meetings 
held by the President's Office with each of the three campuses, 
"bare bone" campus requests totalling $114 million had been re- 
duced to $70.6 million. 

Chairman Spiller then said that the document at hand 
listed capital outlay requests for the fiscal years 1978-1982. 
At the Buildings and Grounds meeting, campus representatives had 
discussed each item. Chairman Spiller said he would review, for 
the benefit of the members of the Committee on Budget and Finance 
the major requests from each campus in the context of the five 
year capital outlay. He then proceeded to summarize the major 
items in each of the campuses' five year plans (totalling $70.6 
million) and the specific items and amounts requested for FY 1978 
by each campus (totalling $12,425 million) as contained in Doc. 
T77-048. 

As there were no questions following his review of the 
Amherst request, Chairman Spiller went on with his review of the 
Boston request. Following his summary, he noted that concern 
had been expressed at the meeting of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds over the impact of the sum of $29 million for Building 
080/2 (arts and science building) and there had been discussion 
of formatting the request so that it would be apparent that the 
entire amount was not to be expended in one year. Trustee Carlson 
said doing this could result in getting an appropriation for "one 
half a horse," and never getting approval for the other half; he 
said that laying out an expenditure schedule, if carefully done, 
would probably lessen the impact without endangering completion 
of the project. 

Trustee Dennis asked if funds for library acquisitions 
were to be included in capital outlay or in the operating budget. 
President Wood said the question of which was the better strategy 
was still unanswered. Amherst and Boston had each received "one 
time" capital outlay appropriations some years ago but recent re- 
quests for books in capital outlay budgets had been either deletejd 
by the Governor or disapproved by the Legislature. Consideration 
has been given, he said, to making a separate justification for 
library needs and including requests for these needs in both the 
capital outlay and operating budget requests. Trustee Dennis 
said he would welcome such an action. On a recent visit to the 
Boston campus he had found that the one thing faculty and student 
agreed on was the need for books for the library. Chancellor 
Bromery said that library acquisitions were more useful if allo- 
cated on a yearly basis rather than in large sums appropriated 
sporadically. He said that at the recent budget hearing held by 
Secretary Parks on the Amherst FY 1978 Maintenance Budget request 



-8- 



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5165 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



there were a number of questions about the level of library acquis 
sitions but past experience would caution that this apparent intejr 
est in library books does not necessarily mean funds would be 
forthcoming. 

Following the Chairman's summary of the Worcester re- 
quest, Trustee Carlson asked if the FY 1978 $3 million request 
for hospital furnishings and equipment was a step towards the 
Hospital's being fully equipped and up to full bed capacity well 
before 1981. Chancellor Bulger said that 1981 was a more realis- 
tic figure for the Hospital's reaching its design capacity. The 
requests are for equipment and expansion of services for existing 
beds and the total five-year request is consistent with the orig- 
inal plans for the Hospital. 

Trustee Gordon asked if the items listed in, for exam- 
ple, the Amherst budget were in order of priority. Mrs. Robinson 
said they were. Trustee Cronin asked why the renovation of aca- 
demic buildings was given second priority, while the renovation 
of residence halls was given third priority. Mrs. Robinson said 
two considerations were involved, the academic buildings are old- 
er than the residence halls and in greater need of repair, and 
consideration was given to the question of state investment and 
interest in the renovation and maintenance of residence halls, 
since these older dormitories are now the property of the Common- 
wealth with the maturation of the bonds. The latter she said was 
an untested issue. Trustee Gordon said he felt it was time to 
test it. Chancellor Bromery said the priority assigned to the 
residence halls was part of the testing. It is very difficult, 
he said, to predict where the Governor or the Legislature will 
draw the line in considering a list of capital outlay request 
items , but because there was a great deal of pressure to renovate; 
the residences, it was felt that there might be a chance that bot 
the second item, academic buildings, and the third, residence 
halls, might be approved. Further, there could conceivably be 
alternative funds for renovating the residence halls; there were 
none for academic buildings. 

Chairman Spiller said the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds had also discussed the problems centered on the Southwest 
Towers and intended to ask Chancellor Bromery to provide a report 
complete with recommendations. Chancellor Bromery said such a 
report was in preparation, the necessary study having been started 
some six months earlier. The report would include recommendations 
for the Towers as well as a long-range plan for the entire resi- 
dence hall system. 

There being no further discussion, the two Committees 
meeting in joint session moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

approve the FY 1978 Capital Outlay Budget Request 
in the context of the five-year Capital Outlay 



-9- 



B&G Comm. 
11/30/76 



"5166 



B&G Comm. 
11/30/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Budget as set forth in Trustee Document T77-048; 
further, that at the appropriate time the capital 
outlay budget request for each subsequent year with- 
in said five-year budget plan shall be subject to 
review and approval of the Board of Trustees. 

President Wood said he wished to thank the Committees 
for their considered review and approval of the request and wanted 
to thank Chairman Spiller and the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds for goading the University into developing a rational 
capital outlay process, particularly the five-year concept. He 
said that each year an additional year's request would be added 
to the process, so that the University would always have capital 
outlay plans dealing with a period of five years. He cautioned 
that even though the maintenance budget was reasonable in terms 
of order of magnitude, and the capital outlay budget was a sensible 
one, there would be "heavy water" ahead, with people accusing the 
University of making unreasonable demands. He did not think this 
was true and was prepared to defend the budget since it was a 
realistic estimate of the obligations and commitments the Common- 
wealth had undertaken over the last fifteen years. He reiterated 
his gratitude to the Committees. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tees, and the meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 



»y^'*. * 




Assistant Secretary 
for Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



i 



-10- 



I 



ATTENDANCE: 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

December 1, 1976; 10:00 a.m. 
Room 308, Administration Building 

Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Breyer, Burack, Cronin, Shaler; Mrs. Bluestone repre- 
senting Trustee Fielding; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members: Trustees Morgenthau and Winthrop 



Other Trustees : Trustees Carlson, Conti, Croce, Gordon and 
Shearer; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mrs. Weiner and Mrs. Simmons, Assistant Vice Presidents 
for Academic Affairs; Ms. Taylor, Assistant to the Director, 
Office of the Budget 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Woodbury, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino 



UM/Worcester : Mr. Smith, Provost and Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs, Medical School 

Guests : Ms. Perlman, UM/Boston student; Mrs. Shukri , Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs 



xj 



5167 






UM/Amherst — 
Transfer of 



Department of 
Leisure Studies 



The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. The first 
item was a proposed Transfer of the Department of Leisure Studies j 
and Services to the Department of Landscape Architecture and Re- 
gional Planning — UM/Amherst (Doc. T77-046) . Chancellor Bromery 
spoke first, reporting that the proposal was one of the results (Doc. T77-046) 
of a year long self-study by the School of Physical Education. 
The study showed that the Department of Leisure Studies and Serv- 
ices and the Park Administration Program in the Department of 
Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the College of 
Food and Natural Resources had shared many interests, both in the 
philosophical aspects of leisure study and the practical applica- 
tions thereof. Also it was felt that a merger of the two programs 
would provide the faculty association with a larger group of col- 
leagues sharing common interests, and it would offer students an 
improved professional training program and enhanced job prospects 
particularly in cities and towns concerned with recreation and 
parks. The faculty of the merged programs are working out detail^ 



"5168 



F&EP Comm. 
12/1/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of a new curriculum. Chancellor Bromery said he felt the new 
curriculum would be an improvement and he felt the merger would 
lead to other creative achievements. 

Chairman Troy noted that in an earlier incarnation, the 
Department of Leisure Studies had been called the Department of 
Recreational Leadership. It was his recollection that the change 
in title was due to its putatively greater "glamour" and because 
it was more in line with the nomenclature now in vogue in univer- 
sities across the country. He said that 'leisure' was once a very 
noble word — Aristotle's man of leisure was man acting as man, and 
his highest activity was to engage in contemplation. Chancellor 
Bromery said leisure was a very serious, and very much neglected, 
concern of society. 

Trustee Burack said she was disturbed by the fact that 
nothing in the title of the program suggested that the training 
being offered led to careers in the field of recreation. She saia 
that all levels of government and most private organizations in- 
terested in the field used the word "recreation" rather than "lei-* 
sure." She wondered if this would affect the job prospects of 
graduates of the program. Chairman Troy said he felt that people 
in the field of recreation who make employment decisions would 
understand the department's use of the word. He asked Chancellor 
Bromery -if there would be jobs for graduates of the program. 

Chancellor Bromery said there was a current demand for 
graduates and this demand would grow as leisure time increased 
and as the public became more aware of the need to utilize recrea- 
tional resources more rationally. He cited the negative environ- 
mental impact of motorized campers and their increased use as an 
example of leisure activities directed, in effect, by industry 
rather than by rational planning. He said the new program was 
the beginning of the effort to introduce leadership into the fielc. 

Mr. Lynton said he wished to emphasize that the Board 
was being asked to merge the Department of Leisure Studies with 
the Park Administration Program, and said he felt that when the 
enlarged department had a revised program, the title would be 
examined . 

Trustee Burack urged that interdisciplinary courses be 
encouraged in the new curriculum, particularly courses in inter- 
personal relations. Chancellor Bromery said the faculty realized 
the need to consider the sociology and psychology of leisure time, 
: noting that Professor Rossi's most recent grant was for a study 
of the sociology of leisure. 

Chairman Troy said he felt the merger was a move in the 
direction of strength. There being no further discussion, it was 
moved and seconded, and 



I 



I 



-2- 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

the transfer of the Department of Leisure Studies 
and Services from the School of Physical Education 
to the Department of Landscape Architecture and 
Regional Planning in the College of Food and Natural 
Resources, as contained in Trustee Document T77-046. 

Following this vote a motion was made and seconded at 
10:30 a.m., and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss personnel 
matters. 

At 10:50 a.m., it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED: To end the executive session. 



After the executive session it was moved and seconded 



and 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the appointment of Dr. Mario D. Fantini by the 
President as Professor of Education with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst as 
set forth in Doc. T77-047. 



and also 



VOTED 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
along with the President in the appointment by 
the Chancellor of Dr. Mario D. Fantini as Dean 
of the School of Education at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst as set forth in Doc. 
T77-047. 



and further 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the appointment of Dr. Israel Abroms by the Presi- 
dent as Associate Professor of Pediatrics with 
tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Worcester as set forth in Doc. T77-049. 



There was no further business to come before the Commit 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 11:10 a.m. 




arm7 " 



ladygj Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-3- 



3169 



F&EP Coram. 
12/1/76 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Mario D. 
Fantini to 
Professor of 
Education with 
Tenure and 
Dean of the 
School of 
Education 
(Doc. T77-047) 



UM/ Worcester — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Israel 
Abroms to 
Associate 
Professor with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T77-049) 



5170 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



NOT USED 



I 



i 



ATTENDANCE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 1, 1976; 11:00 a.m. 
Room 308 
Administration Building 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts /Boston 

Committee and Committee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Shaler, Troy: Secretary Hardy; 
Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Miller, recorder 

Absent Committee Members : Trustees Robertson, Rowland, Spiller 

Other Trustees : Trustees Breyer, Burack, Conti, Cronin, Eddy, 
Shearer; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Mrs. Bluestone 
representing Trustee Fielding 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Janis , Vice President for Management and Business 
Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. O'Leary, 
Associate Counsel; Mrs. Hanson, Director, Office of the Budget 
and Assistant Vice President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Puryear, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Sulzner, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Boelcskevy, Faculty Rep- 
resentative 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Bulger; Mr. Smith, Provost and Associate 
Dean for Academic Affairs, Medical School 

Guests : Mr. Menard, Labor Counsel; Ms. Perlman, Student, UM/ 
Boston; Mrs. Shukri, Executive Office of Educational Affairs 



The meeting was called to order at 11:20 a.m. The firsl: 
item of business was the Cost of Living Adjustment for University ; 
Employees (Doc. T77-043) . Chairman Healey began by introducing 
Mr. Menard, a labor relations specialist from Morgan, Brown, 
Kearns and Joy, the most distinguished firm in this field. The 
Chairman then noted that the collective bargaining election at 
Amherst and Boston was now taking place and the University had to 
move with extreme caution to ensure full compliance with all the 
provisions of the collective bargaining statutes and the general 
laws of the Commonwealth. He mentioned that Mr. Menard reviewed 
the vote soon to come before the meeting and had been asked to 
come and help explain the ramifications of the process. He stress- 
ed that the Board, in delegating authority in these matters, had 
to examine fully every aspect of the situation. 



~S171 



Cost of Living 
Adjustment for 
University 
Employees 
(Doc. T77-043) 



-5172 



Exec. Comm. 
12/1/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood said that when the appropriations act 
for fiscal year 1976 was being considered by the Legislature, and 
while the Commonwealth and the Alliance were involved in collec- 
tive bargaining, the administration had decided that the respon- 
sible position to take would be to wait until some conclusions 
had emerged from the preliminary negotiations and then, as far as 
possible within available appropriations, secure union agreements 
which conform to the patterns set by the Commonwealth and the 
Alliance agreements. 

When the State and the Alliance had reached a final 
agreement, he said, meetings were held with the Chancellors to 
determine the availability of resources and with the labor counse" 
to decide what an appropriate compensation policy would be. The 
net result was the vote sent in a private communication to the 
Trustees, which has been revised slightly, but it represented the 
best judgment at the time. He noted that the timing of this 
proposed Board action was not one chosen by the University but 
it was a calendar dictated by the settlement between the Common- 
wealth and the Alliance. The proposed action was in terms of 
provisions for possible actions, if authorized in December by the 
Board. 

Mr. Menard stressed that the Committee should fully 
understand the import of the proposed vote. Because the State 
and the Alliance have come to a final agreement, the University 
must now complete the contracts being negotiated with the classi- 
fied personnel. The administration is requesting this authoriza 
tion, he said, in order that these negotiations can be concluded. 

The vote, he continued, also speaks to faculty and staf 
not included in the classified agreements, some of whom will soon 
have voted in the collective bargaining election. If approved, 
the vote would authorize the President to take such action as is 
legally appropriate in regard to such faculty and staff. The 
President will not be required to grant any increases nor will 
increases necessarily follow Committee approval of the vote. In 
essence it is an internal administrative matter whereby the Board 
grants the President's Office authorization to take whatever ac- 
tion is legally appropriate. 

No public promise of benefit, Mr. Menard continued, can 
be made to those voting in the collective bargaining election. 
If a bargaining unit is formed as a result of the election and if 
the requisite authorization is granted, the President's Office in 
conjunction with labor counsel will carefully scrutinize past 
practices and the legal situation subsequent to the vote, and 
determine whether or not salary increases are appropriate. Such 
increases will not be mandated by Committee or Board approval of 
the proposed authorization. 

Trustee Burack expressed her concern at the timing of 



-2- 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the proposal. Mr. Menard said that classified agreements were 
currently being negotiated and authorization to negotiate some 
increases were necessary. Further, it was his understanding 
that the Board did not meet in January, thus delaying a final 
agreement for two months, and it would be unwise to defer such 
an action for that length of time. The same strictures applied 
to negotiating with personnel outside the bargaining unit. 

Trustee Burack said that any agreements reached would 
presumably reflect decisions made by the Board. She asked if the 
Board had met and decided on what increases would be offered to 
the bargaining units, either classified or professional. She 
felt these were Board decisions, not administrative ones. Truste 
Carlson asked the Chairman if these decisions were in fact Board 
matters, rather than administrative ones. Chairman Healey said 
that the Board should be involved at some stage of the ratification 
of an overall plan but felt that the Board should not decide on 
the compensation of individuals within the plan. Trustee Burack 
agreed that the Board should not be concerned with individual 
salaries, however, if there were a proposal to change the salary 
schedule, then the Board should decide on the levels for classi- 
fications within the schedule. President Wood said the Board 
had been informed some months ago that his office had taken a 
policy position to move in conformity to general state policy. 
The proposed vote authorizes increases comparable to, but not ex- 
ceeding those, of fered by the State. 



Trustee Eddy said she understood that an agreement with 
either a union or other eligible faculty and staff was being dis- 
cussed, but she was unsure if an across-the-board cost of living 
adjustment was involved, or a merit increase, which might not be 
granted to everyone. Mr. Lynton said it was a cost of living 
adjustment to be applied to all eligible individuals. President 
Wood said the issue of merit increases was moot for this fiscal 
year. 

Trustee Cronin asked for information as to who would 
not be eligible for increases. Trustee Breyer said that people 
on grants or contracts might be ineligible in the event that fund$ 
were not provided in the grant or contract. Trustee Eddy asked 
about employees whose salaries derive from trust funds or student 
fees. Chairman Healey said it was established practice to treat 
them equally where funds permit. 

After a brief discussion there was general agreement 
that the Board should maintain some sort of control over the 
authorization sought. The proposed vote was amended by adding 
the following clauses: "provided that no action may be taken 
which is inconsistent with the collective bargaining law or any 
other laws of the Commonwealth, and such action shall be subject 
to ratification by the Board of Trustees." 



xJJL 9 O 



Exec. Comm, 
12/1/76 



-3- 



"5174 



Exec. Comm. 
12/1/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood said there were time constraints imposed 
on administrative actions. Chancellor Bromery said that negoti- 
ating was fruitless unless the negotiators were acting with au- 
thority. Chairman Healey said the University negotiators would 
have authority subject to ratification. Also, he said, the Board 
could meet when the contracts are ready for final approval and 
not wait until the February meeting. 

Professor Boelcskevy said he wished to voice a faculty 
concern not related to the somewhat technical issue being dis- 
cussed. He noted that the so-called bonus of five percent was to he 
taken from the operating budget. In the case of UM/Boston this 
will amount to some $180,000, thus there will certainly be no 
equity adjustments; part-time hiring in the spring for over-en- 
rolled classes will be jeopardized; and hiring plans for the next 
academic year will be made in a climate of uncertainty. Also, he 
noted, consultation with the faculty as regards the $180,000, 
should have been on the highest level; instead, it was at a junior 
level. He said it appeared to the faculty that this was a decree 
from the President's Office. He found it ironic that in this 
instance the principle of faculty consultation was ignored, partic- 
ularly when viewed in the light of statements and arguments by 
top administrators emphasizing the benefits of the present govern- 
ance system. 

Trustee Breyer pointed out that the $180,000 was an 
estimate of the maximum amount that would be taken from the UM/ 
Boston operating budget. Chancellor Bromery said the Faculty 
Representative seemed to be assuming that a number of administra- 
tive decisions had been made when, in fact, they had not. The 
proposed vote enables the President's Office to act, and when the 
decisions are to be made consultations will be held with the ap- 
propriate people. Mr. Lynton re-emphasized the point that the 
proposed vote does not mandate any steps to be taken. 

Trustee Cronin noted that President Wood, in his memo, 
had mentioned reintroducing some austerity measures. He asked 
for clarification. President Wood said that a high level of 
vacancies would be maintained, wherever possible equipment pur- 
chases would be delayed and all available resources in the current 
operating budget will be committed; the contingency funds normal- 
ly maintained will not be retained. He said the situation meant 
a new set of budget considerations for FY 1978. In answer to 
Professor Sulzner's question President Wood said the phased salary 
increment would total $850 over a full fiscal year, in the remain 
der of FY 1977 the total would be $500. This, he noted, was con 
sistent with State policy. 

Chancellor Bromery said that $850 was the maximum amount 
under the authorization. It could be much less. He said a con- 
tract was now being negotiated with the classified employees and 
he felt the Board should be aware that some action may be require 



t 



P 



-4- 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

by the Board as early as December 20, 1976. Chairman Healey said 
he would be willing to meet if all of the agreements were ready 
for final approval. He also reminded the meeting of Mr. Menard's 
cautions about either the Board or the administration doing or 
saying anything that could be construed as promising something of 
value to those eligible to vote in the collective bargaining elec 
tion. 

Trustee Eddy said she was concerned about a possible 
agreement repeatedly coming to the Board's attention. She then 
asked if it would be possible for the President to complete an 
agreement which would give the employees a "one shot" bonus, that 
is, one which would not be given in the following year. She felt 
this would be disastrous for employee morale. Chairman Healey 
said the chief executive officer had to be given some discretion- 
ary powers. President Wood said the Board's 1971 delegation of 
authority authorized the President to negotiate with the classi- 
fied employees and to redelegate this authority if he chose to do 
so. He felt that at a time when only classified employees and a 
relatively few unions were being dealt with, the arrangement was 
appropriate, and he had, in fact, delegated this authority to the 
Chancellors. He wished to emphasize that the University was now 
at the point of forming a general compensation policy. He said 
that in formulating this policy the Board should be involved in 
laying down salary schedules for professionals and in terms of 
competitive compensation nationally. He then asked Trustee Burack 
if the ratification she had talked about was comparable to that 
which was used after negotiations with the Alliance. 

Trustee Burack said this was the case. She said the 
material supplied to the Trustees concerning collective bargaining 
was quite clear on the point that the current collective bargain- 
ing law absolutely forbad policy making by administrators. Also, 
the Association of Governing Boards held that administrators should 
not be negotiators. Labor counselors have the necessary competency 
and knowledge and should do the negotiation, under direction from 
the policy making body of the institution. She said negotiation 
was just that, with on-going discussions and ratifications, and 
not a decision made in advance. She also stressed that the Board 
should not do anything which could be construed as an unfair labor 
practice. 

Chairman Healey said guidelines were necessary to ensur^ 
that all employees of the University are treated equally. The 
vote attempts to speak to that point and at the same time give 
the flexibility for negotiations which the University has had in 
the past. The Board had influence on the current negotiations by 
virtue of the capacities of the University negotiators and of weli. 
laid out guidelines. He said if the faculty were to vote for a 
collective bargaining unit the situation would be so altered as 
to require new guidelines of the Board's devising. 



-5- 






Exec. Comm. 
12/1/76 



-5176 



Exec. Comm. 
12/1/76 



UM/Amherst — 
Amendment to 
Faculty Senate 
Constitution, 



Doc. T73- 
(T77-051) 



196 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Sulzner asked for clarification. He said it 
appeared that the Legislature and the Governor decided to defer 
cost of living increases until a settlement was reached with the 
Alliance. They then decided to tie the cost of living increases 
into the Alliance settlement to the point where they were willing 
to offer people not covered by the settlement $500. He regarded 
this as a cost of living adjustment and not a negotiated wage in- 
crease. He thought faculty were being penalized by not getting 
a cost of living adjustment because they have been thinking about 
going into collective bargaining. President Wood said that the 
meeting had repeatedly been told such a thing was not the functio^i 
of the proposed vote. The vote was precise and did not address 
the matters Professor Sulzner had raised. Chairman Healey said 
that extreme precaution had been exercised in not intervening in 
any way in the electoral process. 

There being no further discussion it was moved and sec- 
onded, and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in 

accordance with Trustee Document T77-043 and past 
University policy and practice, the President of 
the University be authorized to take appropriate 
steps to complete collective bargaining agreements 
with unions representing classified staff at a cost 
comparable to but not exceeding the cost of the 
Commonwealth's agreement with the Alliance; further, 
that the President be authorized to take appropriate 
steps to provide compensation adjustments for all 
other eligible University faculty and staff at a 
cost comparable to but not exceeding said Alliance 
agreement, provided that no action may be taken which 
is inconsistent with the collective bargaining law 
or any other laws of the Commonwealth, and such 
action shall be subject to ratification by the 
Board of Trustees. 



The meeting then turned to the second item of business, 
Amendment to Faculty Senate Constitution — UM/Amherst, Doc. T73- 
196 (T77-051). Chancellor Bromery said experience had shown that 
it was impossible for one faculty delegate to the Board to attend 
all of the meetings of the Board and its committees. Therefore, 
the Faculty Senate was seeking approval for an amendment to its 
constitution to make provision for Associate Delegates, who would 
have the same rights and privileges as the Delegate. In response 
to Trustee Troy's question Chancellor Bromery said there would be 
one Associate Delegate at first, with more to be appointed if 
necessary. He assured Trustee Cronin that the matter had gone 
through Campus Governance. 



* 



t 



There being no further discussion it was moved and sec- 



onded, and 



-6- 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the following amendment to the Faculty Senate 
Constitution which amendment was adopted by the 
Faculty Senate on October 7, 1976 and ratified 
by the general faculty: 

"That Section 7(d) of the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate Constitution be amended by replacing 
the term 'an Alternate Delegate' with the term 
'Associate Delegates' so that the entire section 
shall read as follows: 

"(d) the Senate shall choose a Secretary, a 

Presiding Officer, a Delegate and Associate 
Delegates to the Board of Trustees." 

Following this vote, a motion was made and seconded at 
11:40 p.m. and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss honorary 
degrees . 

At 12:10 p.m., it was moved and seconded, and 

VOTED: To end the executive session. 



After the executive session it was moved and seconded, 



and 



VOTED : That the Board of Trustees consider an additional 
candidate for an Honorary Degree to be awarded at 
the UM/Amherst 1977 Commencement as agreed upon in 
executive session of the Executive Committee of this 
date. 

There was no further business to come before the Commit- 
tee, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:25 p.m. 




&ac 




517*? 



Exec. Comm. 
12/1/76 



Executive 
Session 



Hadyy Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



-7- 



"5178 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



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